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Archive for the ‘Anderson’ Category

About two years ago I posted my top 10 problems and that post actually led to the solution of one of those problems.  So I am trying here, again, and my list today is somewhat different, due to progress made in several areas.

1. Catherine Young (Bennett) (Baldwin) Ross (1832? – 1907).  The first “gap” in my mother’s family tree is for the parents of my gg-grandmother, Catherine Young (Bennett) (Baldwin) Ross, known as “Grandma Ross” to my grandfather.  Grandma Ross took my grandfather in for a while after his mother died and his father was busy with other things.  He knew about her three marriages because he scrawled all the names on the back of this picture – he was descended from her second husband, Edward Baldwin.

Catherine was born in Surrey, England, possibly 04 Jun 1832.  The borders of Surrey were altered around that time, making this extra-difficult.  Her father’s name may be William B and her mother, Catherine (from her death record).  In the 1900 census she gave her immigration year as 1843; the 1905 census says 1840.  Searching English census records, ship passenger lists and American records has turned up a few speculative possibilities but nothing that seems to fit together.  My earliest record for her is an 1860 census record with her second husband at Belmont in western New York; eventually she had four children, William Blackstone Bennett, Anna Jean Bennett, Harriet Elizabeth Baldwin and Miles Edward Baldwin.  I have found no trace of any member of her original family.

My latest research track:

  • try and pin down her elusive first husband, William Bennett, who was born in Massachusetts.  I suspect she was divorced rather than widowed.
  • Keep investigating the idea that her first marriage might have taken place in Massachusetts, and even the divorce could have happened there.  It did not happen in Allegany County, New York.
  • Keep pursuing possible clues from DNA.
Catherine Baldwin, circa 1900 in Providence, RI, in her 60's.

Catherine Baldwin, circa 1900 on Marshall Street, Providence, R.I. around 1900.

2. Sarah Arnold (1776? – 1861?).  Having confirmed my relationship to Sarah’s husband, Jesse Andrews, I now need to move on to determine which part of the large Arnold family in Warwick Sarah’s father, Joseph Arnold, is from.  That name is pulled from Sarah’s 1795 marriage record in Warwick, Rhode Island.  Sarah is, as far as I can tell, not mentioned in The Arnold Memorial or other books published about the Pawtuxet/Warwick Arnolds, which probably means that she was not mentioned in any local birth or probate records (although I continue to check).  A Joseph Arnold is sometimes noted nearby Jesse and Sarah in census records. 

This would be an ideal common-name problem for me to tackle because I have good access to many records. No excuses!

My latest research track:

  • make my own documentation of all possible Joseph Arnolds, using vital, probate and land records in Warwick and East Greenwich.
  • try to pin down any further details of the neighbor Joseph Arnold, including nearby possible grown children.
  • Explore Joseph Arnold more widely in court, military and cemetery records.
  • I do not know the names of most of Sarah’s children, but continue to try and find those names, possibly in Norwich, Connecticut, as hints to her family.
One of several pages of Joseph Arnold deeds indexed at Warwick City Hall.  Note the "S.D." and "S.W." indicating "Son of D" and "Son of W".  Not every deed has that, of course.

One of several pages of Joseph Arnold deeds indexed at Warwick City Hall. Note the “S.D.” and “S.W.” indicating “Son of D” and “Son of W”. Not every deed has that, of course. That would be too easy.

3. James Lawrence (1807-1882).  My 4x-great grandfather James Lawrence was born in England in 1807, and his father’s name may have been James.  In 1835, he married Ann Shortridge (Shortriggs) in Dorchester, Massachusetts.  The next twenty years found them in North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Connecticut before ending up in Providence by 1860 with several of their almost-grown children.  According to the 1865 census, he was a machinist.  If I could learn more about James’ origins, it might help me to verify my complicated relationship to the Lawrences through DNA testing.

My latest research track:

  • Keep looking for ship passenger records and court naturalization records for James.
  • Other than birthplaces listed by his children years later, I am having trouble pursuing him across the eastern U.S. through the 1830’s – 1850’s, although I do have an 1850 census record for them in Virginia.  Try finding clues from that for further research.
  • Learn more about Dorchester resources such as directories, businesses, and immigrant populations there.
Places fo birth:  England, South Carolina, North Carolina, Connecticut, Rhode Island.  My father was right.  My mother DOES descend from a long line of gypsies.

Places of birth for James’ children, from the 1865 census: England, South Carolina, North Carolina, Connecticut, Rhode Island.

4. Jessie Ruth MacLeod Murdock (1861-1936).  Thanks to a helpful cousin who saw my blog post, I learned about a 1954 local genealogy book written by the nephew of my brick-wall gg-grandmother back in Pictou, Nova Scotia. That was a great moment, but imagine my surprise as I obtained the book and saw her listed as “adopted” – a sentiment I do not believe she shared.  Although I now know more about my gg-grandmother Jessie’s early life in Pictou, Nova Scotia, I continue to know nothing about her mother, Rachel, and her relationship to the people who may have adopted her, William and Mary MacLeod.  Jessie came to the U.S. around 1881, according to the 1900 and 1905 census.  I can find no evidence of her journey or any relatives coming with her.  She married Louis Murdock in 1883, making me wonder if she was related to Louis’ adopted father, William Murdock, also from Pictou.  There are some Rachel’s in the Murdock family.

My latest research track:

  • investigate land and probate records of the Murdocks in Pictou through microfilm at the New England Historic and Genealogical Society library in Boston.
  • see if the name of her third daughter – Jessie Ellen – can be matched with any people from Pictou.
  • naturalization records
The MacLean farm which became the home of William and Mary (MacLean) Murdock, from page 192

The farm in Lorne, Pictou, where Jessie MacLeod spent her teen years, from page 192, The Pioneers and Churches.

5. Lydia Minor (1787-1849). Now that I have solved the Andrews problem, I plan to move one generation back to the Lydia Minor problem.  She married Russell Lamphere in Norwich, Connecticut in May, 1807 “At Preston”, as reported by the announcement in the Norwich Courier. Lydia and Russell had seven boys and seven girls in Norwich Falls, Connecticut.  No vital records for the marriage, the children, or Lydia’s death has been found.  A Norwich Courier notice indicates she died 18 January 1849.

Russell was from Westerly, Rhode Island, and at age 32 in 1808 his father’s probate papers said he was “late of Westerly now residing in Norwich”, however census and town records show him moving between Westerly and Norwich several times.  So the marriage at Preston could be because she was from Preston, or perhaps they were both originally Westerly residents.

Lydia’s 1849 death notice gives her age as 62, making her birth (if true) around 1787.  There was a Lydia Minor born to Jerusha Peabody and Ludowick Minor in nearby Stonington, Connecticut in 1787, however, I am pursuing another person that may be THAT Lydia.

My latest research track:

  • Examine deeds and probate for a potential “Minor” family in Westerly and Preston
  • Look for probate for Lodowick Minor at Stonington.
  • Keep pursuing the possible sister for Lydia, Eliza.
A quote from Lydia's 80 year old son, William, from the Norwich Bulletin, 12 Sep 1898, reminiscing with a friend about his mother.  Sent to me by a kind researcher in Norwich.

A quote from Lydia’s 80 year old son, William, from the Norwich Bulletin, 12 Sep 1898, reminiscing with a friend about his mother. The article later makes it clear both families had 14 children each, in Lydia’s case, 7 boys and 7 girls.  Sent to me by a kind researcher in Norwich.

 6. Maria Shipley Martin (1848? – ?).  Maria or Mariah Shipley Martin, my gg-grandmother, has a fascinating family tree that includes immigrants from Scotland and England who came to Nova Scotia in the 1700’s.  So she is one of those mystery ancestors whose origins are well known, but she disappears from records after 1892, when her daughter got married at her home in Milton, Massachusetts.  I suspect, by that time, she was separated from her husband, but I have never found any further record of her.  Massachusetts was pretty strict about death records so perhaps she had gone with a relative to another state before her death, or perhaps she did, indeed, divorce and remarry.  My family had no knowledge of this branch, so I have found the stories of her children Bessie (my great grandmother), Clara, Hazel and Daisy, but I have found very little about Minnie, May, and John Anderson Martin.

My latest research track:

  • keep looking for a divorce record in several counties.  Look further for a second marriage in Massachusetts.
  • Look for her death record at the NEHGS library in Boston.
  • Try Milton, Mass. city directories.
  • Try naturalization records.
A book of her grandson's sayings and some fabric scraps, put together by Maria's daughters in 1898 after the death of daughter Bessie.

A book of her grandson’s Teddy’s sayings and some fabric scraps, put together by Maria’s daughters in 1898 after the death of daughter Bessie.

7.  Nancy (——-) Lamphere (1752?-1833). Nancy may be a Tefft, but I have no confidence in that so I am open to all names.  She married Daniel Lamphere around 1774 and had six children.  The only records I have for her are her husband’s probate in 1808 (and later), a number of Westerly deeds that she is mentioned in, and the birth records of her children in Westerly. She may have died around 1833.  If she was living next to her son Russell Lamphere in 1810 (perhaps in her third of the house), then apparently she was sometimes called Anne, an obvious variant that I haven’t been using very much.  

My latest research track:

  • Explore middle names that were used by Nancy’s children for their own offspring.
  • Do a thorough review of all the neighbors from early census records, and also those mentioned in the deeds.
  • Look at the spouses of her children for possible connections.
Transcription of Nancy's mark on the 1817 deed to Nathan F. Dixon.  So, Nancy was not able to write her name.

Transcription of Nancy’s mark on the 1817 deed to Nathan F. Dixon. So, Nancy was not able to write her name.

8. Rachel Smith (1734? – ?).   I estimate that my 7th great grandmother Rachel was born around 1735 (based on first child born mid-1750’s), and signed a deed in 1768.  She may have been a Smith.  She married Thomas Arnold around 1754 and they had 5 children that I know of: Lucy, Asa, Catherine, Aaron, and Philadelphia. My most recent clue is that Thomas Arnold purchased some property from John and Mary Smith very early on in Smithfield.  The children ended up in Cumberland, but the story of Thomas and Rachel seems to end around 1775 and although the children stayed in Cumberland, I can find no further trace of Thomas and Rachel – perhaps they died young.  Truly, this one may never be solved which, of course, just seems like a fun challenge.

My latest research track:

  • Pursue the early, local Smiths
  • Keep looking for the exact John and Mary Smith that sold land to Thomas Arnold, following clues in the deed, which I now have.
  • Try looking at town council records for Smithfield.

 

Smithfield records, held in Central Falls, will probably be the best source of Rachel's family.

Smithfield records, held in Central Falls, will probably be the best source of Rachel’s family.

9. James Anderson (1748?-1796).  With the help of some fellow researchers I know so much about my 5x-great grandfather James Anderson of Fells Point, Baltimore, later Chester, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia.  Usually, knowing this much should have led, long ago, to knowing about his origins, but not so in this case.  His original family and place of birth remain a mystery.

My latest research track:

  • My cousins and I are focusing on DNA at this point.
  • Of the latest clues uncovered here and there, the ones that seem the most realistic are for other, earlier Anderson privateers off the coast of Maryland.  I may be able to explore those clues further in Maryland court records online, or at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.
  • Think about how to acquire further records which may be held in England.

New York No 759. These are to Certify that Capt James Anderson was by a Majority of Votes regualrly admitted a Member of the New York Marine Society at a Meeting held the 11th day of June A.D. 1781 Given under my hand and the Seal of the Society this 11th day of June - Annoque Domini 1781.  Geo. Fowler Sec. [illegible] President.

New York No 759. These are to Certify that Capt James Anderson was by a Majority of Votes regualrly admitted a Member of the New York Marine Society at a Meeting held the 11th day of June A.D. 1781 Given under my hand and the Seal of the Society this 11th day of June – Annoque Domini 1781. Geo. Fowler Sec. [illegible] President.

10. Nathaniel Brown (1741? – 1798).  The last one is from my neglected line of Haydens/Parmenters, a closely intermarried family in Sudbury, Massachusetts that has not been that difficult to trace.  Nathaniel Brown married Elinor Hayden in 1761 in Sudbury and was “of Framingham” but I know the neighborhood where my ancestors lived was right on the border between Sudbury and Framingham, so he may have been very close by.  Nathaniel and Elinor had 11 children, and he died rather young in 1798.  There is a strong theory that he is the son of Thomas Brown and Abigail Cheney, originally of Cambridge, but no real proof.  And Brown was a common name in early Sudbury so anything is possible.  Deeds and probate have not solved this yet.

My latest research track:

  • Keep looking through probate records for local possible fathers of Nathaniel, to see if they mention him
  • Go through Nathaniel’s earliest land transactions more carefully.  He took over the farm of Elinor’s father, so the transactions are not that revealing.  Could he have been a cousin?  How did he have money for a purchase?
  • Learn more about the early history of Sudbury and the place of the Browns in it.
An early Sudbury house built by the Parmenters, in a line more closely related to Midge's husband than to mine.  Photo by Diane Boumenot.

An early Sudbury house built by the Parmenters.  Photo by Diane Boumenot.

In closing

It’s possible I wrote this so I could choose my next project.  Still not sure which it will be.

The post you are reading is located at:  http://onerhodeislandfamily.com/2014/10/17/my-top-ten-genea-mysteries/

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My search for the origins of my Loyalist ancestor, James Anderson, originally of Baltimore, has brought me some new information, mostly in the form of pictures.  My previous posts on James Anderson cover his timeline and Loyalist claim, including sources, and his privateer activities.

My grandfather Miles Baldwin is a descendant of James Anderson

My grandfather Miles Baldwin is a descendant of James Anderson

Fells Point

Recently, I was able to visit Baltimore and see the spot where, we believe, James Anderson built a brick house, on Thames Street by the water in Fells Point.  I was surprised to learn that Fells Point has a long history of privateers, and privateers of the War of 1812 era are celebrated in an annual Privateer Festival.  So whatever attracted James to Baltimore (I don’t believe he was born there, but we don’t know where he was born) may have included the kind of marine activities he was interested in.  I believe the 1770’s were early days for Fells Point privateers, so he was part of that.

James Anderson purchased the property from John Bond in 1772 as Lot #22 on Thames Street, Fell’s Point.  My cousin who has been searching for James Anderson’s roots much longer than me, Pat Hagan, had advised me that the spot was roughly at the intersection of Bond and Thames.  We knew it was on the water side because of a 1777 ad in the Maryland Journal describing the auction of the Brigantine Mary-Ann and contents in James’ backyard.  While we are still trying to locate a copy of the map of those original Fells Point lots, he had been told on his own visit to Baltimore that this was the spot, and so that is where I visited.

Corner of Thames and Bond Streets, Fell's Point.  This 1792 map by A.P. Folie is a from the Library of Congress, g3844b ct000792 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3844b.ct000792

Corner of Thames and Bond Streets, Fell’s Point. This 1792 map by A.P. Folie is from the Library of Congress, http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3844b.ct000792

From home, I prepared many maps and visited all the streets in advance on Google maps.

The intersection of Thames and Bond Street, Fells Point, looking out on the water.

The intersection of Thames and Bond Street, Fells Point, looking out on the water.

A visit to Baltimore

During a recent visit to Baltimore I took a cab over to Bond and Thames and the cab driver obligingly waited while I wandered around snapping photos.  The spot I was there to visit actually consisted of a long, wide dock, with a very old brick warehouse running along one side, now in use as shops and restaurants.

Looking towards downtown from Fells Point.

Looking towards downtown from Fells Point.

My first impression was that 235 years had not completely changed the setting.  There were wharves and ships, brick buildings, shops and restaurants and, just inland, old two- and three-story buildings obviously still used as homes.  The water itself was timeless and beautiful.  Baltimore, then and now, could be seen across the way.

A house across Thames Street, also serving as a shop.

A house across Thames Street, also serving as a shop.

I noticed the cobblestone streets and charming brick buildings.  One across the way was serving as a shop.

The cobblestone streets and old houses and shops lined Bond Street.

The cobblestone streets … old houses and shops lined Bond Street on a cold January day.

I was charmed by the setting and found myself picturing sloops anchored offshore and the busy streets filled with sailors, ship owners, and their families.

Bond Street Wharf Building at the corner of Bond and Thames.

Bond Street Wharf Building at the corner of Bond and Thames.

I’m always afraid, when I visit somewhere, that my ancestor’s stomping ground will now be a convenience store.  But in this case, I did get a sense of the sailors and captains walking through cobbled streets (legend has it the streets are made from ship’s ballast) amidst homes, gardens, taverns, children, women running shops, and every kind of sea-craft along shore.

A picture of James Anderson’s son

Prior to my visit to Baltimore this winter, my wonderful cousin Pat Hagan also managed to send me something I have long heard about, and never seen, the photographs of James’ Anderson’s son (my 4th great grandfather) John Secomb Anderson and his wife (my fourth great grandmother) Elizabeth Hardacker Anderson.  They are property of the Nova Scotia descendants, and those kind folks have given permission for these copies to be placed here.

John Secomb Anderson, 1790-1869

John Secomb Anderson, 1790-1869

These are the first pictures I have seen of direct ancestors born in the 1700’s.  Exciting!  The picture of John Secomb Anderson (named, I believe, for a popular local minister in Nova Scotia) is the only idea we have of James’ appearance.  I can’t help but imagine that  the adventurous James Anderson’s expression was never so severe. But John lost his father early in life, and perhaps was not greatly influenced by him.

Elizabeth Hardacker Anderson, 1789-1871

Elizabeth Hardacker Anderson, 1789-1871

Naval history

In addition to sources I’ve mentioned in my first and second posts on James Anderson, I am trying to learn more about his dealings with the American and British navies.  The series “Naval Documents of the American Revolution” is what I am exploring right now.  Each of the 11 volumes can be downloaded from the website of the American Naval Records Society and contains an index.  The stories in the books are descriptive and fascinating, although it is challenging to know which refer to this James Anderson.

In closing

Did seeing Thames Street help my research?  I actually think it did.  Being in Fells Point alerted me to the early days of Fells Point privateers.  Since there is no evidence yet that James came from an early Baltimore family, the privateering gives me an idea of what might have drawn him to Fells Point from somewhere else.  All in all, it helps to picture what I’m researching.

Lately, my cousins and I have been learning more about other Andersons in the counties surrounding Baltimore. There is another cousin, Bonnie, also working on this, and other relatives cheering us on.  A 1729 deed was sent to me by Pat Hagan for 100 acres of  “Sunken Islands” property sold to a James Anderson of Anne Arundell County, Maryland by Philip Jones, Junr.  Could that James be a father or grandfather? A historian that I mentioned in my second post, Richard D. Pougher, sent us a story from the 1750’s about Captain John Anderson and the Brigantine Betsey.  Other sources also refer to various early seafaring Andersons.  Somehow, I feel like we are compiling so many clues, that we will manage someday to put them together to tell the story of where James Anderson came from.

Last but not least, a direct male descendant of James Anderson in Canada has agreed to supply DNA for a Y-DNA test.  This is our first foray into DNA testing, and we will see if it helps at all.

The post you are reading is located at:  http://onerhodeislandfamily.com/2014/05/08/picturing-james-anderson

IMG_1081

 

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My ggggg-grandfather James Anderson was a Loyalist who moved to Chester, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia around 1783.  The Chester records indicate that he was from Baltimore, Maryland, as well as the names, birth dates, and birth places of his four children (born in Baltimore, New York, and Chester).  I am descended from James Anderson in the following way:  his son John Secomb Anderson, John’s daughter Margaret (Anderson) Martin, her son Marston Martin, his daughter Bessie Blanche (Martin) Baldwin, and her son Miles E. Baldwin, who was my grandfather, born in Massachusetts.

I reviewed what was known about James Anderson of Baltimore, in a blog post called “A Question of Loyalty.”  We know the James Anderson in Chester who filed a Loyalist claim (detailed in that post) owned a house in the Fells Point section of Baltimore.   Since then, a lot of interesting information has surfaced, thanks to collaboration with some smart and hardworking fourth cousins who are also tracing James’ story.  What we have uncovered makes his story far more complex than any of us thought.

082A Privateer

Towards the beginning of the conflict, James was some sort of privateer and took the Patriot’s oath.  We found an example of an auction of a ship and its contents, right at James’ house on the Baltimore waterfront, in Maryland Journal, Tuesday, February 11, 1777 [from the book Naval Documents of the American Revolution, vol. 7, Part 8, p. 1173  (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, 1976)].

Baltimore, February 11, 1777

By Virtue of a Decree of the Honourable Court of Admiralty for the State of Maryland, on Tuesday the 18th Instant, at 10 o’Clock in the Forenoon, at the House of James Anderson, Fell’s Point, will be Sold, by Public Vendue, for Ready Money,

The Brigantine Mary-Ann, with her Tackle, Apparel and Furniture, as she came from Sea; a fine Vessel, Burthen 200 Tons, well found and fitted.  An Inventory will be produced at the Place of Sale — Same Day will be Sold a Quantity of Mahogany and Logwood, the Cargo on board said Brigantine.

– David Stewart, Marshall

Evidence of the Patriot turned Tory

Some new information found by my cousin Bonnie Anderson Lord was from a doctoral thesis written by Richard D. Pougher, University of Maine: “Averse … to Remaining Idle Spectators:” the Emergence of Loyalist Privateering During the American Revolution, 1775-1778, Vol. 1, p.110.   James Anderson of Fells Point, Baltimore “willingly [took] the rebel oath, he willingly joined their forces and was made a lieutenant on a galley.” He was “given his own command” but ultimately “proceeded to sail his vessel to New York and deliver her to the British. When next heard from, he commanded a loyalist privateer.”  One of the cousins, Pat Hagan,  discussed our research with Dr. Pougher and received some further advice about sources.

Using the Footnotes

Following the leads in footnote 85 of Chapter 3, “Averse … to Remaining Idle Spectators:”, I found further information.

From the Pennsylvania Gazette, September 6, 1780 page 3 [Accessible-Archives.com:  accessed 1 Nov 2013]

Several of the enemy’s small privateers and whaleboats have lately infested Chesapeak-bay, and captured a number of small craft, some of them richly laden; but by late letters from Virginia we learn, that a sloop of ten guns decoyed and took one of their whale boats rowing 36 oars; after taking out the prisoners they manned the boat from the sloop, and proceeded down the Bay to the place where these picaroons [pirates] rendezvoused, and took six more boats, with a sloop of ten guns; among them is a barge with 25 men, commanded by the noted Jemmy Anderson, late of Fell’s-point.

the noted Jemmy Anderson

a barge with 25 men, commanded by the noted Jemmy Anderson, late of Fell’s Point

Charged with high treason

The second footnote led us to the story of James’ capture and imprisonment in Virginia.  This is recorded in a letter from the state of Maryland to Thomas Jefferson, Governor of Virginia.  Since this will probably be the only time I find a letter about a direct ancestor written to a future American President, I’m going to enjoy that.  High treason and all.

From volume 43 of the Journal and Correspondence of the State Council of Maryland, October 27, 1779 – November 13, 1780.  [section dated Sept 13, 1780; p 289-290]:

Council to His Excy Govr. Jefferson.  [Thomas Jefferson, Governor of Virginia in 1780 – James Anderson had been sent to a prison in Richmond]

Sir We have received Information that a certain James Anderson, a Subject of this State, was captured in one of the Barges or Gallies which have, for some Time past, infested our Bay and interrupted our Trade, by Capt Yellott & Folger and carried into the the State of Virginia, and is now confined at Richmond. Anderson, before and since our Governmt was formed, lived on Fell’s Point in Baltimore Town, took the Oath of Allegiance and Fidelity to the State prescribed by Law, was appointed and commissioned a Lieutenant in one of our Gallies, and from his Activity and apparent Zeal, was always reputed a Friend to America and entrusted with the Command of a Vessel owned by some Gentlemen in Baltimore which he carried to New York; he is well acquainted with our Bay and has committed great Depredations on the Property of our Inhabitants.

The above Recapitulation of Facts renders it unnecessary to suggest to your Excellency that the said Anderson cannot be deemed a Prisoner of War and exchangeable, though he may hold a Commission from the Enemy and was taken in one of their Vessels, because he was a Subject of this State, took the Oath of Allegiance as such, and no subsequent Act by him can dissolve the Obligation he was under to the State, and therefore was, at the Time he received his Commission and must now be considered a Subject of this State and amenable to its Laws for any Offence committed against the Peace and Government thereof. We do charge the said Anderson with High Treason against the State and solicit you to cause him to be sent to us, under a Sufficient Guard in Order to take his Trial at our General Court, which will be held on the second Tuesday in October next and to transmit what Testimony you may have against him. We shall take Care that every Expence incurred thereby shall be reimbursed, as soon as it is ascertained.      [Council Colo. George Dashiell]

Thomas Jefferson, by Rembrandt Peale [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Thomas Jefferson, by Rembrandt Peale [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

From volume 43 of the Journal and Correspondence of the State Council of Maryland, October 27, 1779 – November 13, 1780.  [section dated Sept 19, 1780; p. 295-296]:

[Council to John Sterrett Esqr]

Sir Commander Barron from the State of Virginia, is just arrived here, … The Commodore has brought up the Barge in which Anderson was taken, and thinks, if she was properly fitted, she would be very serviceable and, in Conjunction with the State Boats, be sufficient to attack the Enemy’s Barges & Whale Boats, and that the Barge would be particularly useful in expelling them from the Creeks & other Places of Concealment …

Finding court records

Maryland has a significant quantity of historical records online, but I was unable to find any collection that might contain “his Trial at our General Court” mentioned in the letter to Jefferson. So I turned to:

  • The Red Book: American State, County and Town Sources, Third Edition, ed. by Alice Eichholz.
  • Genealogical Encyclopedia of the Colonial Americas by Christina K. Schaefer (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co, 1998).  If you can find the record set you want, it actually gives you FamilySearch microfilm numbers.  For the states, it covers the period before the United States government was in place.

I learned a lot about Maryland records, and in the end I decided that the large set of digitized volumes, online, may hold a lot of the “court” records I am looking for.

“Both a Pirate & a spie”

This week cousin Bonnie made a discovery that was pretty startling.  On the Maryland State Archives site, there were affidavits taken in 1781 from several individuals about an “Anderson” that ring very true for our James.

First of all, below, I repeat the first paragraph of the record, in which the writer laments the easy distribution of certificates that allow “Traitors” to travel freely.  Apparently James impressed the magistrate so favorably that he was actually asked to carry a letter to the governor!

But the real clue in this paragraph is the mention of Capt. Yellot as the one who caught James.  This matches the name in the 1780 record about James’ extradition to Maryland (see above), where Fell’s Point is mentioned.  I’m quite sure this is our James Anderson.

Mr John Mackall a Majestrate of St Marys I think Deserves Censure. His administring the Oath of Allegiance, & Granting a Certificate to Anderson, Gave Colour for His application to Colo Barnes, whom I am willing to suppose, was Influenc’d only, by that Plausable Appearance of His being a Good Subject, to Grant Him a Pass & Give Him the Letter which He carried to your Excellency. These several Circumstances together, Occasion’d His Passing thro this County without Interruption — & had He not spoke freely to Heathman & Ogg, in Confidence of security, having restor’d to them their Vessell, wth a Complement of Salt, & they afterwards Devulg’d it, so that it came to Capt. Yellot, who was going Immediately to Annapolis, He Anderson, might probably have PasStd unmolested to the Enemys Lines at New York. Magistrates & Officers Ought to be Extreamly Caution to whom they administer Oaths, or Grant Passes; otherwise, whatever Laws may be Enacted, it will be very Difficult, Nay almost Impossible, to Detect Traitors & Spies when Passing thro: the Country, as I believe they frequently have Done without the least Notice.

Apparently Anderson encountered several men that, six months earlier, he had stolen a barge of tobacco from, offering them a share if they swore allegiance to the British and accompanied him to New York. He may, later, have returned the barge to them.   Each appeared in court and made a statement about the encounter.

[Willm Fitzhugh, Calvert County, to Gov. Lee.] July 18, 1781.

… It appears Clearly that Anderson is both a Pirate & a spie.  He was acting in the Enemys Barges when they murder’d Burn’d & Plunder’d Particularly at Lower Marlbro the 8th Day of Apl last, He was also a Principal man, at the taking of several Vessels Loaded with Tobo in the mouth of Patuxt in December last besides what is mention’d in Your Excellency’s Letter to me on that Subject. He Has also traveled through the Country under two Names, & Different pretences & told various falsehoods & shew’d a Commission from the Enemy &c &c.

… The Deposition of Thomas Heathman aged about thirty six years being duly sworn … saidth That on Friday 29th June last he fell in Company with a Man at Hunting Town who called himself Anderson dressed in a country Cotten kersey coat light sandy hair grey eyes and being asked by Col Joseph Wilkinson if he ever saw this person before & where. The deponents answers he believes him to be same person that captured him in Patuxent River a few days before Christmas last as one of Ridley’s Crew in a Barge, That he told this deponent that he was one of the persons in the Barge with Robinson at Lower Marlbro, That if this deponant had gone with them to N. York he would have been considered as Owner & had the Vessell & half the Cargoe given to him, … That he said he had a Brother arrived in Phila. who commanded a Ship or vessell called the Holker & that he want’d to go there to see what his brother would do for him as he had now deserted from the English the cause of which was his killing a Man in a duel, That he told this deponent he was chased in a Vessell from Bilboa into St. Mary’s River …

I've been fascinated for a while with The Pirates Own Book by Charles Ellms, 1837.  I guess now I know why.

Lately, I am very drawn to the book The Pirates Own Book by Charles Ellms, 1837.  Now, I guess I know why.

… The Deposition of Alexander Ogg aged about thirty six years … deposeth & saith That on Friday the 29th June last a Man who called himself Anderson carrying his hand a white wintry made kersey Coat striped trowsers a handsome bristol Stone freemason Broach in the breast of shirt a black silk barcelona handkerchief about his neck and asked this deponent if he kept Tavern who answered in the Affirmative & the Man called for Grog he told this deponant he had brought in from Bilboa a fine parcell of Arms Viz. 2800 Stand and the vessell was chased by two English Frigates from point look out up the River Potowmack & that he had run into Britons Bay where he had delivd them safe to Col. Richard Barnes whose pass he said he had This deponent then went about his business and after sometime on his return into the house he saw Mr Thomas Heathman & the above Anderson siting near together Heathman reading a printed paper which he is satisfied was an English Commission & that Anderson had a letter directed to his Exy Thos Sim Lee. Mr Heathman adressed this deponent this is the Man that took our Tobacco in Patuxt a few days before Christmas, this deponent demanded of Heathman if he did not know this Man who answered yes he now recollected him but did not know him at first Anderson then said to Heathman it was the best Tobo ever carried to N. York and had you staid with the vessell & gone to N. York you would have shared sixty pounds hard money for that was each man share

Journal and Correspondence of the Council of Maryland, 1781, vol. 47, p. 355-359.

In Nova Scotia

Whatever the trial and subsequent activities in the Revolutionary War may have been, ultimately James Anderson and family settled in Chester, Nova Scotia by the mid-1780’s.  They had four children, including a son, John Secomb Anderson, my gggg-grandfather.  John Secomb Anderson has several descendants who are pursuing the history of this family today.

Early poll tax records in Chester:

list at least one James Anderson, occupation Seaman, but it’s not possible yet to be sure this is him.  When son John Secomb Anderson died in 1869, his death record stated that his father was James Anderson, Sailor.  John’s death record can be found at   https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/  by searching for this:  John A Anderson, died 1869 in Kentville, Kings County.

The treasure chest

OK it’s not exactly a treasure chest, but this chest IS full of family treasures, and according to the family in Nova Scotia, had once belonged to James Anderson and was his “sea chest”.  A few documents belonging to James have actually been preserved in this chest, and the rest are various family documents from later periods, safely stored away.  It’s a amazing that the family managed to save this.

James Anderson's sea chest, which contains a few of his documents and many later family papers. Photo by Pat Hagan.

James Anderson’s sea chest, which contains a few of his documents and many later family papers. Photo by Pat Hagan.

One document from the chest is James’ certificate from the New York Marine Society, 1781.

New York No 759. These are to Certify that Capt James Anderson was by a Majority of Votes regualrly admitted a Member of the New York Marine Society at a Meeting held the 11th day of June A.D. 1781 Given under my hand and the Seal of the Society this 11th day of June - Annoque Domini 1781.  Geo. Fowler Sec. [illegible] President.

New York No 759. These are to Certify that Capt James Anderson was by a Majority of Votes regularly admitted a Member of the New York Marine Society at a Meeting held the 11th day of June A.D. 1781 Given under my hand and the Seal of the Society this 11th day of June – Annoque Domini 1781. Geo. Fowler Sec. [illegible] President.

The most important seems to be the certification from Masonic Lodge No. 9, Nova Scotia.  The wording on this certificate appears to be standard for the fraternal organization, and is dated 24 June 1791.

James Anderson Mason document

James Anderson Masonic document, 24 June, 1791. Photo by Pat Hagan.

What’s on the reverse of the certificate makes it so valuable.

The Masonic document, with writing on the back

The Masonic document, with writing on the back “Died in the West Indies, July, 1796.”  Photo by Pat Hagan.

This note – “Died in the West Indies July 1796″ –  is the only death information we have for James.  There is a marriage record for a “Mary Anderson, widow”  and Josiah Marvin in Chester in 1797.  Recently, cousin Pat found a death record for a “Captain Anderson” in St. James, Jamaica, September 11, 1796.  We are looking into that.

In conclusion

Many of James’ descendants are curious about his origins.  I can find no records from early Baltimore that make it appear likely that James Anderson was born there.  Where was he from, and who were his parents?  Were any of the possible brothers named so far in various documents really his brother?  I wonder if I can find an origin for one of them?

What caused James Anderson to turn to the Tories, after taking the Patriot oath in Baltimore?  If he broke with the British during the war, why/how did he submit a Loyalist claim later in Nova Scotia?  Did he see any actual service, or was he a privateer during most of the war?  Did he continue a seafaring life after relocating to Nova Scotia?  Does the 1796 death record refer to him, and what caused his death?

The post you are reading is located at:  onerhodeislandfamily.com/2013/11/21/james-anderson-both-a-pirate/

Ship illustration, and chest illustration, below, from Dover.  Pirate’s Own Book (illustration of Captain Avery, page 29) available on Google books.

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A Question of Loyalty

There are certain things you never imagine you’ll found in your family tree.  I do have Minute Men present at the Battle of Lexington. I have someone who may have served in the Rhode Island militia.  But the FIRST participant in the Revolutionary War that I found among my direct ancestors was James Anderson, Loyalist.

That was a complete surprise.  My mother never knew that her grandmother, Bessie Blanche Martin who died at age 27, was born in Nova Scotia, Canada.  As I uncovered Bessie Blanche Martin’s story (part onetwothreefour - five) I found that Bessie had a gg-grandfather, James Anderson, who arrived in the Loyalist settlement at Chester, Nova Scotia in the mid-1780’s, settled there with his wife and children, and never lived again in the United States.  It was his great grandson, Marston Martin, that chose to move to Newton, Massachusetts around 1885, with some other relatives from his wife’ family.  Bessie married in Massachusetts, had two sons, and died very young.

Relationship Chart

Chester, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia

Chester in Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia lies a couple dozen miles east from Halifax, along the southern coast.  It was sparsely settled by the English as early as 1760, and there were vacant properties given to Loyalists after the American Revolution in the 1780’s.   James Anderson seems not to have been part of the initial group of Loyalists to receive land in the early 1780’s, so his arrival date is uncertain.

Thinking about Loyalists

I’ve had a couple of years to think about my ancestors’ roles in the Revolutionary War.  The first concept I had to grasp was that it was really a civil war.  The colonies were loyal to the king because England was (in many cases) their home country.  They were English. As recently as the French and Indian War in 1759, the colonial militia and the Redcoats fought (hypothetically at least) side by side.  It took 150 years of political turmoil in England, and a troubled relationship between the mother country and the colonies, to motivate the colonies to believe they might be better off fending for themselves.  But it was like any political opinion, NOT EVERYONE SHARED IT.

As I began to research Loyalists and their experiences, a second surprise was in store for me.  THERE ARE STILL LOYALISTS, in a way.  There are still people who greatly admire those that fought NOT to divide the U.S. off from Great Britain.  Some groups that help researchers learn more about Loyalists do so because they still admire the cause.  For someone who grows up in the U.S., this comes as a shock.  What a great lesson this has been in historical thought.  The winner gets to write the story, and write out the people who don’t fit the new reality.  It’s always important to think about all sides of a question and to NEVER assume that everyone feels the way we do, just because everyone we’ve met so far does.

What I know about James Anderson

The story of James Anderson must be a fascinating one, but I don’t really know it yet.  There are interesting clues, and at least several descendants trying to figure out his story.  I have learned a lot by consulting with my mom’s fourth cousin, Pat Hagan, who had left a lot of inquiries online.  He has a cousin connection in Nova Scotia, and has shared information with me. Let me present the details that are known.  Of course I approached this problem from the most recent events back to more distant events, but let me present a timeline here in chronological order.

First, a warning: there are clearly at least two other Loyalist James Andersons in the Chester area at that time: a father and son from the Boston area who had origins in Scotland (but I am not setting out to prove that today).  The facts below are the ones that I believe belong to MY James Anderson.  I present this here to allow others to add to or refute this information.

  • 1748  James may have been born around 1748.  Parents and place unknown to me. (8)
  • 1772  James leases Lot #22 on Thames Street, Baltimore, from John Bond. Thames Street is in the Fell’s Point section.  Following an index page pdf sent to me by Pat Hagan (good going, Pat!), I tracked down this page of land records on the Maryland State Archives.  I registered for an account, and am waiting to gain access to the books, but here is the index entry (1):
1772   Grantee: Anderson James   Grantor: John Bond   Instrument: Lease  Location of Property:  Lot #22 on Thames Street.No: E  Folio:  336.

1772 Grantee: Anderson James Grantor: John Bond Instrument: Lease Location of Property: Lot #22 on Thames Street.No: E Folio: 336.

  • 1770’s?  James married Mary, date and place unknown.  There is a marriage recorded at the First Presbyterian Church, Baltimore, 03 Jan 1775 for James Anderson and Mary Clark (12).  But this may or may not be them, and other than the birth of the first child in Baltimore in 1776 (recorded much later in Nova Scotia) there is no evidence of where the marriage took place.  Some cousins think her name may be Brimmer, because of the name of the fourth child, Ann Brimmer Anderson. The source for the name Mary is the Chester Records of their “Heirs”. (6)
  • 1774  John French, of Fell’s Point, has a probate record in Baltimore 12 Oct 1774 – 14 Nov 1774. Since many factors are leading me to think James was from the Fell’s Point area, I believe this may indeed be my James Anderson.  Just like the Claim papers, the bequests here suggest a fairly affluent lifestyle.  The gilt-framed picture suggests they may be of the same religion, but whether this is Catholic or Episcopal, or something else, I’m not sure.  (3)
    • “Bequeaths to James Anderson – friend
      • to have 1 pair of cast iron hand irons and 1 looking glass, and 1 gilt-framed picture (“of our Saviour on the Cross”), 1/2 dozen silver tea spoons, and tongs and strainer.
      • named guardian to testator’s daughter and her estate and to keep it in his possession until she comes of age and should she die them to keep estate for the benefit of testator’s relations in Ireland until such time as they call on him.
      • named executor of will.
      • Others mentioned: daughter Ellinor French and witn. William Asquith, Thomas Elliott, Micajah James.
  • 1776 Daughter Mary born in Baltimore, Maryland, 19 Nov 1776. (6)
  • 1770‘s/1780‘s  During this period James acquired two properties: (7)
  1. A Farm containing 320 Acres, seventy of which cleared and well fenced and a Dwelling House and Barn thereon, the growth of Wood Black Walnut … Being situated on the North Branch of Potomack near Fort Cumberland
  2. Also a two Story Brick House well finished with five fire places in it, a two Story framed House on the back of the above well finished with Two Fire Rooms in it, A Stable and Kitchen both framed, Situated on Follys point on the East part of Baltimore Town in Maryland  [note:  I expect this is meant to be FELLS POINT on the east part of Baltimore …]
Map of Maryland, showing first arrow to the farm location, and second arrow to Fells Point, Baltimore.

Map of Maryland circa 1775, showing first arrow to the farm location “on the North Branch of the Potomack near Fort Cumberland”, and second arrow to Fells Point, Baltimore.

  • 1776  James “was among the first that opposed the Association at the Beginning of the Rebellion and at many times was under the necessity of leaving his Estate and family at their Discretion, and Screen himself in the Woods.” (7)
  • 1778 (April)  James “joined His Majesty’s Forces at Philadelphia and had a [Permit?] from General Howe to procure Provisions for the Garrison which he did in a Vessel of his own; in consequence thereof the Rebels Confiscated his Estate, and every individual Article he was Possessed of.” (7)  This shows that James owned a vessel.  I assume the claim was denied (see full transcript, below) because there is only supplying going on here, no real military service.  But I don’t know much about this subject.
  • 1778 – 178?   James “rendered every Essential Service in his power during the War, serving often as a Pilot” (7)
  • 1781  James was admitted as a member of the New York Marine Society.   (certificate, below, provided by Pat Hagan, from an original passed down in the family).
New York No 759. These are to Certify that Capt James Anderson was by a Majority of Votes regualrly admitted a Member of the New York Marine Society at a Meeting held the 11th day of June A.D. 1781 Given under my hand and the Seal of the Society this 11th day of June - Annoque Domini 1781.  Geo. Fowler Sec. [illegible] President.

New York No 759. These are to Certify that Capt James Anderson was by a Majority of Votes regularly admitted a Member of the New York Marine Society at a Meeting held the 11th day of June A.D. 1781 Given under my hand and the Seal of the Society this 11th day of June – Annoque Domini 1781. Geo. Fowler Sec. [illegible] President.

  • 1782  Daughter Eunice born in New York. (6)
  • 1785  Arrival in Chester by this date.  In Chester birth record for his children, recorded 1785, James and Mary Anderson said to be “Late of Baltimore, in Mary Land.” (6)
  • 1785  Grant of 150 acres in Chester, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia to James Anderson. (11)
  • 1786  James “between the 15th of July, 1783, and the 25th of May, 1784, lived or resided at Halifax” (7)
  • 1788  Grant of two Town Lots to James Anderson in Chester, Nova Scotia. (11)
  • 1788  Robert Anderson, tanner, of Fell’s Point, Baltimore Town, has a probate record in Baltimore 8 Sep 1787 / 5 Sep 1789.  He mentions a married daughter, Milley McDade, and a wife, Mary Anderson, and “testator desires that something be left for his relations in Pennsylvania.”  He mentions his property near Bank and Bond streets, and Swan Alley.  I have no idea if Robert is related to James Anderson.  But if he is, this provides an interesting clue to other family members being in Pennsylvania.  (2)
  • 1790 (Feb 6)  Son John Secomb Anderson born in Chester. He is likely named for the elderly Chester Congregational minister, John Seccombe, who passed away in 1793 (a graduate of Harvard University with a controversial career in the clergy, John Seccombe lived a long and fascinating life).  Whether there is more to the connection, I do not know.  Rev Seccombe has a diary online from a much earlier period in Chester. (6)
  • 1791 (Jun 24) Lodge No. 9, Masons, certify that Brother James Anderson is a Regular Registered Master Mason on the Registry in Nova Scotia.   Certificate, below, provided by Pat Hagan, from an original which has been passed down in the family.
To all whom it may concern:  we do hereby certify the Brother James Anderson is a Regular Registered Master Mason in the Lodge No. 9 on the Registry of Nova Scotia and has During his stay amongst us Behaved himself as Becomes an honest Brother.       and as such we recommend him to all worthy Brethren wheresoever Providence may Order his Lott. Given under our hand and seal of our Lodge this 24 June 1791 and of Masonry 3791 By order of the Master Tho Thomson Secy, Roger English Master, James Bruhan T:W, Daniel W. Harron T:W

To all whom it may Concern: we do hereby certify the Brother James Anderson is a Regular Registered Master Mason in the Lodge No. 9 on the Registry of Nova Scotia and has During his Stay amongst us Behaved himself as Becomes an honest Brother.
and as such we Recommend him to all worthy Brethren wheresoever Providence may Order his Lott. Given under our hand and Seal of our Lodge this 24 June 1791 and of Masonry 3791
By order of the Master Tho Thomson Secy, Roger English Master, James Bruhan T:W, Daniel W. Harron T:W

  • 1793  James Anderson listed on the 1793 Poll Tax record for Chester, as a “Seaman” with 1 cattle and 3 sheep. (5)
  • 1796 (Sep 22)  daughter Ann Brimmer Anderson is born in Halifax.  (6)
  • 1826 (Mar 9)  James Anderson died in Chester, Nova Scotia.  Source:  Abstract of “Lunenburg County Birth, Marriages and Deaths” on Rootsweb.  Note there are three James Andersons in Chester; the other two are a father and son from Scotland, I need to keep checking the vital records. (8)  There is also evidence James Anderson may have died in 1796.  More on that in the future.

In conclusion

The certificates for the Masons and the Maritime Society definitely belong to James Anderson since they were passed down in the family and the images reached me from my mother’s fourth cousin. They are probably the most certain information.  I believe that the Chester Town Book record naming my 4x-great grandfather John Secomb Anderson as the son of James Anderson “late of Baltimore, in Mary Land” definitely refers to my ancestor James Anderson.  From that I feel quite sure that the Loyalist claim entered here is also referring to my exact ancestor.  I believe that the “Folly’s Point” in the Loyalist claim might easily be a poor recording of Fell’s Point.  So I believe the John French bequest refers to my ancestor.  Also, according to the Loyalist claim there was a farm near Fort Cumberland, Maryland.   After that, any remaining details in Maryland and Chester seem unproven, and I will continue to try and sort them out.

Next Steps

  1. Find the full record for the lease on Thames Street, Baltimore from 1772, and any other Baltimore land records for James Anderson.
  2. Figure out whether the Poll Tax list of 1793 , refers to this James Anderson.
  3. The best prospect for further information may be the farm in or near Cumberland, Maryland which was evidently lost during the Revolutionary War. There could be records of the original purchase, or the surrender of it.  The spot was in various counties over the 1700’s:  Prince George’s, Frederick, Washington, and Allegany.   One would have to disentangle that first, and allow for some confusion in the record holdings.
  4. See if the Audit Office records of these Loyalist Claims contain any other records for James Anderson – a more complete record of the decision, for instance.
  5. Completely document the facts for the OTHER James Andersons, Jr and Sr., so as to make clear whether any of these records belong to them.
  6. Explore more fully the footnotes for Chapter 5 “New England Moves North: the South Shore of Nova Scotia” in People of the Wachusett, p. 273-280.  There are some manuscripts and journal articles mentioned in there.
  7. Investigate land/probate records in Chester, Nova Scotia.

Full text: The Loyalist Claim (A.O. 13 / 24, p. 7-9)

Here is the full text of the Loyalist Claim Files number 1453 and 1562. (7)

No. 1453 – an envelope or outside of folded paper, indecipherable except for “Rejected May 27″

[p. 7] To the Honorable the Commissioners appointed by Act of Parliament, for Enquiring into the Losses and Services of the American Loyalists —– The Memorial of James Anderson.

Sheweth      That your Memorialist from Principle of Loyalty and attachment to the British Government was among the first that opposed the Association at the Beginning of the Rebellion and at many times was under the necessity of leaving his Estate and family at their Discretion, and Screen himself in the Woods.

That your Memorialist in April 1778 joined His Majesty’s Forces at Philadelphia and had a [Permit?] from General Howe to procure Provisions for the Garrison which he did in a Vessel of his own; in consequence thereof the Rebels Confiscated his Estate, and every individual Article he was Possessed of.

The your Memorialist rendered every Essential Service in his power during the War, serving often as a Pilot as is well known by Commissioner Duncan of His Majesty’s Dockyard, and John Quin now in the Honble [?] Commission as [?].  That your Memorialist from the heavy Losses he sustained and his indigent Circumstances, was thereby rendered uncapable of going to Great Britain when others did, to give in his claim.

Your Memorialist therefore prays and Hopes that his Case may be taken into Consideration in order that your Memorialist may receive such aid as his Losses and Services may be found to deserve.

And your Memorialist as in Duty Bound

Will Ever Pray

[?]

[p. 8] Estimate of the Losses sustained by James Anderson, Loyalist, for his Attachment and Loyalty to the British Government during the late War in America.

—————————–    L. [?] D.

A Farm containing 320 Acres, seventy of which cleared and well fenced and a Dwelling House and Barn thereon, the growth of Wood Black Walnut ……………….   560 —

Being situated on the North Branch of Potomack near Fort Cumberland ———

Also a two Story Brick House well finished with five fire places in it, a two Story framed House on the back of the above well finished with Two Fire Rooms in it, A Stable and Kitchen both framed, Situated on Follys point on the East part of Baltimore Town in Maryland …………….200 —-

  • Also two Horses ………. @ £10.each …….20 —-
  • One fourteen day Clock Mohogany Cased  …….  10 —-
  • Two cows @ £5.10.0 each …….. 11—-
  • Two Beds and Bed Steads and Furn  ……. 20 —-
  • One New Mohogany Desk ——- 6 —-
  • Seven New Mohogany Chairs ……………………. 7 —-
  • Two Mohogany Tables    ………….7 . 10 . 0
  • Two Large Looking Glasses ………. 3 . 10 . 0
  • One Chair and Harness ……………  5 —-

The above Acct in Maryland Currency      £1452

Dollars at 7/6 each

[larger title or signature illegible at bottom]

[envelope or front of folded papers] No 1562

The Memorial of James Anderson

New Claim

d’d 24 April 1786

Rejected 29th May 1786

[p.9]   James Anderson late of Maryland but now of Chester, County of Lunenburg maketh oath and faith, that he resided at Halifax from the 15th of July 1783 and to the 25th of March, 1784, and this Deponent further saith, That he was utterly incapable of preserving or delivering to the Commissioners appointed by Act of Parliament, passed in the 23d Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, entitled, “An Act for appointing Commissioners, to enquire into Losses and Services of all such Persons who have Suffered in their Rights, Properties, and Professions, during the late unhappy Dissentions in America in Consequence of their Loyalty to his Majesty and Attachment to the British Government, or at their Office, any Memorial, Claim, or Request, for Aid or Relief, on Account of this Deponent’s Losses, during the late unhappy Dissentions in America, within the Time allowed by the said Act, or receiving such claims, by Reason that this Deponent, during all such time, viz, between the 15th of July, 1783, and the 25th of May, 1784, lived or resided at Halifax aforesaid And this Deponent further saith that by Reason of his Poverty he was unable to go to England in person, which at that time he thought was necessary if he desired a Claim

James Anderson

Sworn before the [?]claims at Halifax the 22 April 1786

[illegible signature]

Sources

  1. Baltimore County Court (Land Records, Grantee Index) [MSA CE 32-2] A-Z, p. 0011. Printed 08/19/2013. Online 06/16/2008.
  2. Baltimore County, Maryland, Wills.  Liber 4, i.  1787-1789.  Abstracted by Leslie & Neil Keddie, The Family Tree Bookshop.  P. 63.  Folio 372:  Robert Anderson (abstract).  I examined this book at the Allen County Public Library.
  3. Baltimore County, Maryland, Wills, 1774-1779.  Abstracted by Leslie & Neil Keddie, The Family Tree Bookshop.  p. 8.  Folio 289:  John French (abstract).  I examined this book at the Allen County Public Library.
  4. Brumbaugh, Gaius Marcus. Maryland Records: Colonial, Revolutionary, County and Church from Original Sources. Vol. 1.  Baltimore: Waverly Press, 1915.  Frontispiece: Map Showing the Counties of Maryland 1773-1776 by Edward Bennett Mathews.
  5. Chester, Lunenburg County — 1793.  Commissioner of Public Records Nova Scotia Archives RG 1 vol. no. 444 — Poll Tax 1791-1794 Sheet 062
  6. Chester Township Book (Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia).  In particular:
    • Births / Family Records, 1762-1820.  “Heirs of James and Mary Anderson”
  7. Claims, American Loyalists, Series II, A. O. 13, number 24, New Claims, Nova Scotia.  Public Records Office, London.  FHL microfilm 366717 American Loyalist Claims, 1730-1835.  Great Britain, Exchequer and Audit Department.  A.O. 13   Nova Scotia Bundle, 24.,  p. 7 – 9, “James Anderson”.
  8. Deaths, Burials and Probate of Nova Scotians, 1800-1850, from Primary Sources.  Vol. 1 (A-E) by Allan Everett Marble. Halifax: Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia, Pub. No. 22, 1999.  Page 16, “James Anderson d. 29 Mar 1826 age 78″ cites MG4 Vol. 13(B) which is the Chester Township Records and various Chester church records.
  9. Henderson, T. Stephen and Wendy G. Robichaud.  The Nova Scotia Planters in the Atlantic World 1759-1830.  Fredericton, N.B.: Acadiensis Press, 2012.
  10. Jaffee, David.  People of the Wachusett, Great New England in History and Memory 1630-1860.  Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999.  See in particular Chapter 5, New England Moves North: the South Shore of Nova Scotia.
  11. Loyalists and Land Settlement in Nova Scotia, A List compiled by Marion Gilroy, under the direction of D.C. Harvey, Archivist.  Halifax: Public Archives of Nova Scotia, Pub. no. 4, 1937.  Reprinted for Clearfield, Baltimore, 1990, 1995.  This book may be browsed at Ancestry.com. Page 67, “James Anderson”.
  12. “Maryland, Marriages, 1666-1970,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F4JQ-84V : accessed 29 Sep 2013), James Anderson and Mary Clark, 03 Jan 1775.

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In the last two posts we learned that my great grandmother Bessie was from Nova Scotia and that she married and passed away in Newton, Mass.

My grandfather saw little or nothing of the Martins after Bessie’s death.  When I began researching them I figured out a bit about Bessie’s mother’s family, the Shipleys.  I was stuck on Bessie’s father Marston Martin and getting nowhere.

Then an Ancestry.com thing happened

Marston has been in my Ancestry.com tree for a couple years.  One day, I noticed that someone had saved Bessie and Clara’s pictures to another family tree.  Although I’ve had some false alarms in the past, of thinking there might be a connection only to find something was wrong, I looked through the other tree carefully.  What I found astonished me.  Marston’s parents were there, James and Margaret Martin, just as advertised in the Nova Scotia marriage license.  Margaret was an Anderson.  As I clicked way back through the Martin tree I was amazed to see the birthplace of  “Lebanon, Connecticut” and, even earlier, “Edgartown” (that’s on Martha’s Vinyard, Massachusetts).

I wrote to the tree owner and we began a correspondence.  He’s very nice and a good genealogist.  Years ago, his wife’s mother told him some family stories and, in consultation with her, he began to research her family and document the tree.  His mother in law knew of Marston, who “had gone down to the states”.  The family called him Mars. The tree owner actually lives in Wolfville, which he said was a pleasant college town. I was looking for Marston’s life before leaving Nova Scotia.  He was looking for Marston’s life after leaving Nova Scotia. We met on Ancestry.

Meet the Martins, Andersons, Coldwells and Bartletts

He told me that the original Anderson settlers, James and Mary Anderson, were Loyalists from Baltimore.  I have since learned that a number of other descendants have tried to trace him further, with no success.  It’s been fun connecting with those distant cousins, though.

Then he explained that the Martins were New England Planters.  They were recruited in southern New England in the 1750’s to come to Nova Scotia and take over the Acadian land that had belonged to the French before they were expelled by the British in 1755.  Marston’s gg-grandparents Brotherton and Betty Martin were among those that settled in Horton Township.  They are buried in the Old Burying Ground in Wolfville.  The original grant of land stayed in the family for over 200 years although it has now been sold.

My ancestor Brotherton Martin was born to a family of early settlers on Martha's Vinyard

Brotherton Martin was born in Edgartown, Martha’s Vinyard in 1719 but moved as an adult with his brother to Lebanon, Connecticut.  He married Elizabeth Bartlett in Lebanon and they moved to Horton Township around 1761.  My research is preliminary but the Bartletts are part of a group that moved from Duxbury in Plymouth County, Mass. to Lebanon, Connecticut.

So far, I suspect that Betty Bartlett is a Mayflower descendant many times over; her great great grandparents include John Alden and Priscilla Mullins, and her ggg-grandparents include Mayflower passengers William Brewster and Richard Warren.

In closing I can only imagine that Grampa would have been very, very interested in this story.  I can easily imagine him researching these places, people and events.  He knew more about the Baldwins than I have yet found, however I am sure I know more about the Martins.  There was a distinct lack of history and roots in Miles’ life; little did he know his own history was all around him in southern New England.

–Diane

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