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Archive for the ‘Emery’ Category

I visited Townsend, the home of the Baldwins, Spauldings, Emerys and Gassets for the first time last week.

Since most of my mother’s ancestors lived within about 50 miles of Rhode Island, I will have an opportunity to visit each place they lived in many times.  This visit was just to familiarize myself with the town and visit the historical society and cemeteries.

It’s a Small Town

My first stop was a roadside antiques consignment shop on the way into town.  There I met a woman who was related to Richard N. Smith (said she was his cousin, but as genealogists know, that could mean anything), the author of the 1978 history of Townsend called “Divinity and Dust – A History of Townsend, Massachusetts.”  I told her if she got a chance to let him know how much I enjoyed the book.

While driving around, I had the wonderful experience of spotting streets named for many of my ancestors:  Spaulding Street, Emery Road, Jefts Street, Blood Road.

Townsend Historical Society

Townsend Historical Society located on Main Street in the Townsend Harbor section.

I next approached the Townsend Historical Society.  I didn’t have an appointment but was greeted cheerfully and shown into an office where I discussed what I was researching.  I was able to photograph some membership roles of the Congregational Church from 1847 and 1851.  My direct ancestors were out of Townsend by that time, but some aunts, uncles and cousins remained.  I recognized many of them in the lists.  I was asked not to reproduce those photographs here.

The Historical Society had some files, ephemera and other records but nothing that seemed to fit well with the family names and times I mentioned. But I was able to inquire about old Townsend newspapers and the nearest city newspapers.  I purchased a few small items which complete my set of written works on Townsend history (see bibliography below.) I purchased a black and white reproduction of this 1856 Townsend map.  I was invited to send in any queries that I might have in the future, and perhaps I will, since I have only just started with this group.

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Next I visited Hillside Cemetery.  This cemetery is very big but for some reason I drove right up to the memorial I was looking for.  It carries the names of many of the siblings of my ggg-grandmother, Polly (Spaulding) Baldwin, 1806-1839.  It is a memorial to Miles Spaulding (1819-1896), who was a physician in nearby Groton, and is buried in Groton. It was placed by his widow; they had no children.  I wonder if this turn of the century marker replaced some older ones?  The earliest death on this memorial is 1834.

Capt. Isaac Spaulding, 1779-1834, Lucy Emery His Wife, 1788-1862, Ruth Spaulding, 1816-1899, Harriet N. Spaulding, 1822-1907, MILES SPAULDING

I never found the graves of my grandfather’s great grandparents, Eli and Polly (Spaulding) Baldwin.  But I knew the cemetery was recorded, section by section, in the Vital Records of Townsend Massachusetts book which I had on order, so I knew I could return with that another time and find everything.  My grandfather’s grandfather, Edward Baldwin, and his sister Catherine were left orphans when Eli and Polly died.  Polly’s siblings, particularly those mentioned on the marker above, did a lot for Catherine and Edward.  So I was touched to see that Catherine (Baldwin) Hunt (1834-1904) was buried in the same plot.  She and her husband, William Hunt, did not have any children.  I suspect Edward Baldwin died alone, and is not buried here.  But there is a lot still to learn about him.

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground, Earliest Known Burial – 1735

My last stop was the Old Burying Ground on Highland Street.  A more manageable size than Hillside, I examined every marker, and also referred to a list I had brought.  Even with that, I will need to refer to the Vital Records list and make a trip back.  Meanwhile, here is what I found.

Old Burying Ground, Townsend

My ggggg-grandfather John Emery (1754-1828):

In memory of Mr. John Emery, who died March 13, 1828 in the 75th year of his age

John’s father, my gggggg-grandfather Zachariah Emery, 1716-1804

In memory of Mr. Zachariah Emery who died 3 May 1804 aged 87 years.

My gggggg-grandfather Deacon Isaac Spaulding, 1710-1776

In memory of Dea. Isaac Spaulding who departed this life March 4, 1776 in the 66 year of his age. “Beneath this stone death’s prisoner lies, The stone shall move the prisoner rise; When Jesus with almighty word, Calls the dead saints to meet the Lord.”

My gggggg-grandmother, Sarah (Barrett) Spaulding (1714-1806), wife of Deacon Isaac:

In memory of Mrs. Sarah Spaulding widow of Dea. Isaac Spaulding who died 11 Feb 1806. In the 92 year of her age.

My ggggg-grandfather Lieut. Benjamin Spaulding, 1743-1832

In memory of Lieut. Benjamin Spaulding who died May 27, 1832. Aged 89.

My ggggg-grandfather Reuben Gassett, 1754-1822:

Erected in Memory of Reuben Gassett who died Dec. 18, 1822 AEt. 69. “Come! said Jesus’ sacred voice, Come, and make my paths your choice, I will guide you to your home, Worthy Pilgrim, heither come!”

Next Steps

  • Go through the cemeteries again with a better list in hand
  • Send some questions to the Historical Society
  • Explore newspaper resources
  • Locate several ancestral homes through the various books and maps available
  • Find military records for more of these ancestors

A Bibliography of Townsend Resources:

  • Hallowell, Henry C., (“transcribed and edited by”).  Vital Records of Townsend, Massachusetts, Town Records to 1850 with Marriage Intentions to 1873 and Cemetery Inscriptions.  Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1992.
  • The History of the Churches of Townsend, Mass.  Townsend: Townsend Historical Society, 1973. (44 pages)
  • Sawtelle, Ithamar B. History of the Town of Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, from the Grant of Hathorn’s Farm, 1676-1878.  Fitchburg, Mass.: Published by the Author, Press of Blanchard & Brown, 1878.
  • Smith, Richard N. Divinity and Dust, A History of Townsend, Massachusetts.  Lancaster, Mass: Richard N. Smith and the Townsend Historical Society, Printed at the College Press, 1978.
  • Town of Townsend, Incorporated June 29, 1732, 250th Anniversary.  Townsend Historical Society, 1982. (88 pages, mostly pictures)
  • Wornham, William.  The Last Muster: A Survey of the Civil War Veterans Buried in Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.  Second Ed., 1998. (36 pages)

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Since my recent trip to the Sons of the American Revolution Library, I am following up by searching for more evidence of the service of various ancestors.

My ggggg-great grandfather John Emery of Townsend, Massachusetts is, so far, the best-documented soldier.  I am related in this way: my grandfather Miles Edward Baldwin – his father M.E. Baldwin Sr – his father Edward Baldwin – his mother Polly Spaulding – her mother Lucy Emery – her father John Emery.  Knowing from an index that John’s widow, Ruth Sanderson Emery, received a pension, I was able to find that in Fold3. She received the pension from 1839 until her death in 1851.

There are 32 pages in her widow’s pension file.  I am transcribing most of that here. Gray text is included for completeness; brown text represents more relevant portions.

Service:  Mass.
Emery, John  W.      Number: 14686     Ruth

sample from page 1

I Jedidiah Jewett of Pepperell in the County of Middlesex in the State Massachusetts depose and say that I am eighty four years of age and that I am a pensioner of the United States for services rendered in the War of the Revolution.  That I formerly lived in Townsend in said county of Middlesex that I was well acquainted with John Emery who former lived in said Townsend.  Said Emery and myself enlisted in a company of Minutemen about the first day of September one thousand seven hundred and seventy four under Capt. James Hosley.  We were called upon to march at the alarm of the Concord fight and did march the nineteenth of April one thousand seven hundred and seventy five to Cambridge Massachusetts.  Said Emery and myself staid in the service a short time under said Capt. Hosley.  We then enlisted for eight months in the Regiment commanded by Col. William Prescott.  Said Emery enlisted said eight months under a Capt. Farwell and I enlisted under Capt. John Nutting. And said Emery and myself served said eight months out, which time expired the first of January one thousand seven hundred and seventy six.

Scenes at Bemis’s Heights, near Stillwater and Saratoga, NY and map of the engagement from The Pictorial Field Book of the Revolution by Benson J. Lossing, New York: Harper & Bros, 1851, v.1, p. 46.

I further depose and say that I was with said John Emery in said war in the year one thousand seven hundred seventy seven about three months and a half a month.  We marched from Townsend sometime in September under Capt. James Hosley to a place called Battenskill in the State of New York, from there we marched to a place called Trulls Mills.  From said Trulls Mills a part of the company went to Fort Edward and a part to Stillwater.  Said Emery and myself were both in the Battle at the taking of General Burgoyne, we then marched down toward Boston as a guard to Burgoyne’s Army.  We won made up pay for the said last term of service  to the first day of January one thousand seven hundred and seventy eight.  While Emery and myself were in the aforesaid eight months service we were both in the Battle of Bunker Hill, and further I say not.

Attest Paul Gerrish          Jedidiah Jewett

Joel Emery

State of Massachusetts, Middlesex County.  Then personally appeared the above named Jedidiah Jewett and made oath that the foregoing affidavit by him subscribed is true.
Before me Paul Gerrish Justice of the Peace I certify the above named Jedidiah Jewett is a credible person.
Paul Gerrish Justice of the Peace

I Jonathan Bailey of Townsend in the County of Middlesex in the State of Massachusetts depose and say that I am now eighty years of age and that I am a pensioner of the United States for services rendered during the War of the Revolution and that I am well acquainted with John Emery who formerly lived in said Townsend and who is now dead.  Said John Emery and myself enlisted to go to the State of Rhode Island for the term of two months in Capt. John Minot’s Company in Colonel Whitney’s Regiment.  We marched from said Townsend the tenth day of May of the same year that Burgoyne’s Army was taken.  We first went to Providence, from Providence to East Greenwich, from there to East Kingston after which we were stationed in different places in Rhode Island until our two months had expired when we returned home.  I lived a near neighbor to said Emery in the time of said war and I knew that he started to go to Cambridge at the time of the Alarm of the Concord fight and was gone eight or nine months and I knew he marched off with other soldiers at the time Burgoyne’s Army was taken he was gone some time from home but how long I cannot now recollect.  I was not in the service with said Emery the two last mentioned times he was out.  And further I say not.

Attest Paul Gerrish        Jonathan Bailey
Benjamin Robinson
State of Massachusetts
Middlesex County  August 27th 1838
 
Then personally appeared before me the above named Jonathan Bailey and made oath that the foregoing affidavit by him subscribed is true.
Before me Paul Gerrish Justice of the Peace I certify the above named Jonathan Bailey is a credible person.
Paul Gerrish Justice of the Peace

The Minute Man from The Pictorial History of the United States by James D. McCabe, Philadelphia: 1898.

I Joel Emery of Townsend in the County of Middlesex in the State of Massachusetts depose and say that I am a son of John Emery who formerly lived in said Townsend and who is now dead. He died the night of the twelfth or the morning of the thirteenth of March one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight and left a widow who is my mother and who has never since been married since the death of my said father John Emery and that I am now forty six years of age.

Joel Emery

State of Massachusetts

Middlesex County  August 28th 1838

Then personally appeared the above named Joel Emery and made oath that the foregoing affidavit by him subscribed is true.
Before me Paul Gerrish Justice of the Peace I certify the above named Jonathan Bailey is a credible person.
Paul Gerrish Justice of the Peace
 
Declaration
In order to obtain the benefits of the Act of Congress of the 7th of July 1838 entitled “An Act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows.”
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Middlesex, County of
On this twenty-eighth day of August eighteen hundred and thirty-eight personally appeared before me Solomon Strong one of the judges of the Court of Common Pleas of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts the same being a court of record Ruth Emery a resident of Townsend in said County of Middlesex, widow, aged seventy-nine years.  Who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the Act of Congress passed July 7 1838 entitled “An Act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows.” 

That she is the widow of John Emery late of said Townsend who served as a private soldier in the Revolutionary War.  The said John Emery served at three different times.  The first [occurred?] about the first day of September seventeen hundred and seventy four, that is he enlisted at that time as a minute man and marched at the time of the Concord fight April 19, 1775 under Capt. James Hosley and remained a short time in service under him and then enlisted for eight monthsin the regiment commanded by Col. William Prescott.  He enlisted under a Capt. Farwell and said John Emery served out said eight months which expired the first day of January seventeen hundred and seventy six.  The second time of service was in the year seventeen hundred and seventy seven about three months and one half.  He marched from Townsend sometime in September under Capt. James Hosley to a place called Battenskill in the state of New York from there to a place called Trulls Mills and from said Trulls Mills a part of the company went to Fort Edward and a part to Stillwater.  He was in the battle at the taking of Burgoyne and then marched down towards Boston as a guard to Burgoyne’s army and his pay was made up to January 1, 1778. 

John Trumbull’s The Surrender of General Burgoyne. Image by the office of the Architect of the Capital, U.S. federal government. According to Wikipedia, Col. Prescott is in brown just behind Col. Morgan, in white.

He was in the Battle of Bunker Hill.  The third time of service was, the said John Emery served in Rhode Island two months in Capt. John Minot’s company and Col. Whitney’s Regiment.  He marched from said Townsend on the tenth day of May of the same year that Burgoyne’s army was taken.  He went to Providence, from Providence to East Greenwich from there to East Kingston after which he was stationed in different places in said Rhode Island until the term of two months had expired when he returned home.  She further declares that she was married to the said John Emery at Lunenburg in the County of Worcester and commonwealth aforesaid, on the seventh day of December 1780 by the Reverend Zabdiel Adams then the settled and ordained minister of said town.  And she further declares that the said John Emery died at said Townsend on the twelfth day eighteen hundred and twenty eight and she has remained his widow ever since never since having married.  She further declares that her name before she was married was Ruth Sanderson.  That she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service but the marriage took place  previous to the first of January seventeen hundred and ninety four viz at the time above noted.  She further declares that she has not in her possession any documentary evidence except what is her best [?] and cannot procure any other further evidence except what is [?].  

Witness, Solomon Strong      Ruth Emery Her Mark

Ruth Emery Her Mark

Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Middlesex County on this twenty eighth day of August eighteen hundred and thirty eight, personally appeared before me Solomon Strong a judge of the Court of Common Pleas for said County of Middlesex the same being a court of record Ruth Emery above named and subscribed the above declaration by making her mark in my presence and I witnessed the same and she made solemn oath to the truth of the above declaration before me.  The same Ruth Emery is unable by reason of bodily infirmity to attend court.  Solomon Strong Judge C.C. Pleas. 

I certify that I took the examination of the said Ruth Emery at Townsend aforesaid.
Solomon Strong Judge C.C. Pleas. 

[statement of the Lunenburg, Mass. town clerk concerning the 1780 marriage record, omitted here]

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Town Clerk’s Office, Middlesex County, Townsend, August twenty eighth, Eighteen hundred and thirty eight
I David Palmer Clerk of the town of Townsend County and Commonwealth aforesaid, make the following extracts from the records of said town in my possession. (to wit.) Record of Town Meeting

“1st.  At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of Townsend held on Monday 14th day of April 1777.

Art. 3 voted six pounds to each of the eight months men at Cambridge.

2. At a regular meeting of the inhabitants of Townsend holden March 1 177[8?]

Art. 4 Voted to accept the report of the Committee chosen to estimate the services done in the war which is as follows, To the men that went with James Hosley at the taking of Burgoyne (1777) 45/ each.  To the six months men that went with Capt.Lakin to Rhode Island in 1777 – 30/ each/ “

I David Palmer clerk of the Town, County, and Commonwealth aforesaid depose and say, that the above are true Extracts, from the records of the town of Townsend aforesaid, now in my possession.
David Palmer Town Clerk.

[Verifications by Clerk Elias Phinney and Judge Solomon Strong omitted here]

Statue of Col. Prescott, Charlestown, Mass. Sculpted by William Wetmore Story, 1881. Image published between 1900 and 1906. Publisher: Detroit Publishing Co. Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

These lines may Sertifie all whome it may Concern that John Emery whilst he belonged to this town Served in ye Continental Service was estamated by ye Commitee chose by ye town for that Purpose at Eight Pounds thirteen shillings and eight pence [?] Townshend April ye 9th 1779. [3 signatures ???   ?] for Townshend.

Paid at the Treasury under the Act of the 6 April 1838 from 4 March 1839 to 4 Sept 1839 – [?] notified 19 June 1840.
Massachusetts – 2044
Ruth Emery, widow of John Emery, dec. and who died on the 12th of March 1828. Of Middlesex in the State of Masstts – who was a priv & corp in the company commanded by Captain Hosley of the Regt commanded by Capt. Prescott in the Masstts line for 9 mos. 29 days [?] 2 mos 10 days [?]
Inscribed on the Roll of Massachusetts at the rate of 41 Dollars and 77 Cents per annum, to commence on the 4th day of March 1836.
Certificate of Pension filed the 13th day of March 1837 and sent to Paul Gerrish, Esq., Townsend, Masstts.
Arrears to the 4th of March, 1839   125.31
Semi-annual allowance ending 4 Sept     20.88     ————–   [total] 146.19
Act July 7, 1838
Recorded by S.A. Elliot Clerk, Book A Vol. 1 page 85.

Bunker Hill Monument, from Samuel Adams Drake, “Historic Mansions And Highways Around Boston”. Boston: Little, Brown, 1906.

[a very similar form follows, omitted here, no amounts given, called Massachusetts 1140, saying "sent to Isaac Fiske, East Cambridge, Mass.", Recorded Book A, Vol. 1, p. 41]

[The following letter from a Boston attorney names other recipients of widows' pensions:]

James L. Edwards, Esq
Com. of Pensions
Merchants Bank
Boston  2 Sept 1848

Sir,

Enclosed are the declarations made by the following named widows, to obtain the Benefit of the Act of Congress if 2 Feb 1848.

They wish that their Pension Certificates may be sent to my care.

Very Respectfully,

Your Obed. servant

G. L. Bulfinch

  • Adams, Hannah
  • Chapin, Lavina
  • Darling, Priscilla
  • Eames, Anna
  • Hartwell, Merriel
  • Hill, Sarah
  • Jewett, Sarah
  • Lewis, Lucy
  • Shearman, Sarah
  • Woodward, Elizabeth

[These two are grouped: ]

  • Fairbanks, Beulah
  • Smith, Elizabeth

[These four are grouped with an illegible note:  ]

  • Brackett, Betsy
  • Chapin, Lucy
  • Pratt, Mary
  • Wood, Lovice

[These six are grouped:  ]

  • Adams, Elizabeth
  • Ball, Phebe
  • Carley, Mary
  • Emery, Ruth
  • Searle, Hannah
  • Messer, Betsy

[1900's correspondence with Mrs. Nellie Emery Henson, Tenney Morse, and Mrs. J.A. Crocker omitted here. ]

[further 1843 and 1848 paperwork from Boston pension agents omitted here]

Source: “Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files.”    Digital Images, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 5 August 2012), entry for John Emery and widow Ruth.  Massachusetts.  Pension Number W.14686. NARA M804. Washington: The National Archives, Catalog ID 300022 (“Case Files of Pensions and Bounty-Land Warrant Applications Based on Revolutionary War Service, documenting the period ca. 1775-ca. 1900″). 
 
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The Battle of Lexington, Boston : Published by John H. Daniels & Son, c1903
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

 

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While preparing for a business trip to Louisville, Kentucky, I was surprised to discover that the Sons of the American Revolution Library was just down the street from my hotel.  I have recently found some evidence that individuals in my “new” lines of my grandfather’s Baldwin and Spaulding ancestors served as Massachusetts Minutemen during the Revolutionary War, and I was eager to see if I could learn more.

Sons of the American Revolution Library, 809 W Main St, Louisville

The Library

The Library moved two years ago to a location on West Main Street’s “Museum Row” – a neighborhood filled with museums, school buses, families, and a surprising amount of statuary.   If you are ever looking for the library, it’s impossible to miss because it’s right across the street from the Louisville Slugger factory and museum and there is a giant, and I mean giant, baseball bat in front of that building.  So, look for the giant bat.  Eventually, the SAR hopes to fill the rest of the building they’re in with a museum of their own.  I think that’s a wonderful idea.

As I said, you can’t miss it

I emailed the head of the library, Michael Christian, in advance to make sure the library would be open during normal hours that week and to ask him if he would mind if I took some pictures.  He said it was fine.

I managed to visit the library on Tuesday afternoon and Friday morning.  Admission is $5 for non-members.  The receptionist was very nice and showed me a locker for my belongings.  I brought in only a notebook and my camera.  Inside, I met Mr. Christian and he gave me a tour and we talked about the research I was doing.

The books are neatly arranged on two floors

The library did not disappoint.  It’s quite new, of course, but above and beyond that it has a clean, orderly, uncluttered atmosphere unusual in a genealogy library.  The collection of books is focused on American history, genealogy, and local history. Many sets of books that I had seen elsewhere just looked better at the SAR Library thanks, I suspect, to a significant amount of re-binding which kept the books in excellent shape.  Pretty much all areas of the country are covered but I never ventured past the New England section.  There were compiled military indexes, such as the Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War.

The Rhode Island section of the local history books

There were far more family genealogies than I expected.  I welcomed the chance to find something privately published that I may not have seen before; there could be clues in such a book.  That didn’t really happen, except for one manuscript about the Lampheres that I had previously only seen online.

There were some resources available on the computers, and I looked up SAR applications related to people in my family.  I found four that I wanted to see, and the microfilm was brought to me.  The microfilm equipment was quite nice, by the way.  I paid for the pages I printed.

What I Found

My grandfather Miles Baldwin had a grandfather named Edward Baldwin.  The people on the list below are Edward Baldwin’s great-grandfathers from northern Middlesex County, Massachusetts.  This is what I have seen about my Massachusetts Militia ancestors:

John Emery (1753-1828) of Townsend, Mass.  From SAR application #55064:

  • Private in Captain James Hosley’s company of minute men, Col. William Prescott’s regiment, who marched to Cambridge on the alarm of April 19, 1775.  Service, 9 days. [note:  on that date, the Battles of Lexington and Concord began the Revolutionary War; called by Emerson "the shot heard round the world."]
  • Private in Captain Henry Farwell’s Company, Col. William Prescott’s regiment, enlisted April 25, 1775.  Service, 98 days.
  • Private in Capt. Zachariah Fitch’s company, Col. Samuel Brewer’s regiment, enlisted August 23, 1776, discharged September 30, 1776.  Service, one month, nine days.
  • Corporal in Capt. John Minot’s Company, Col Josiah Whitney’s regiment; arrived at Rhode Island May 10, 1777; discharged July 9, 1777, service, two months, ten days.
  • No address given, but the company was raised in Townsend and nearby towns,  Third Corporal in Capt. Aaron Jewett’s company, Col. Job Cushing’s regiment, enlisted July 27, 1777; discharged August 29, 1777.  Service, one month, 10 days.
  • Private in Capt. James Hosley’s company of volunteers, Col. Jonathan Reed’s regiment, enlisted September 26, 1777; discharged November 2, 1777.  Service, one month, 15 days.

Benjamin Spaulding (1743-1832) of Townsend, Mass.  (page 108 of  The Spalding Memorial by Samuel Spalding, the standard Spaulding/Spalding genealogy, mentions that he was a school teacher, and three of his daughters also followed that profession).  From Mass. Soldiers & Sailors of the RW, vol. 14, p. 686:

  • Sergeant, Capt James Hosley’s co of Minutemen, Colonel William Prescott’s regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775, to Cambridge; discharged May 4, 1775; service, 18 days, reported returned home.

David Baldwin (1734-1824) of Billerica, Townsend and Pepperell, Mass.  Appears in SAR application #87616:

  • Private, Capt. William Greenleaf’s co., Col. Job Cushing’s Regt.; enlisted Sept 3, 1777, discharged Nov 22, 1777, service, 3 mos. 7 days.  Roll dated Lancaster.  Private, Mass. Militia.

Reuben Gashet/Gasset/Gaschet (1754-1822) of Hopkinton, Westborough and Townsend, Mass.  From Mass. Soldiers & Sailors of the RW, vol. 6, p. 304-5:

  • Private, Capt. Seth Morse’s co., Major Genl Ward’s regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 5 1/2 days
  • Private, Capt Moses Wheelock’s co., Col. Jonathan Ward’s regt.; muster roll dated Aug 1, 1775; enlisted April 24, 1775; service 3 mos. 15 days, also, company return [probably Oct. 1775]
Next Steps
  • Continue to search and evaluate the Mass. Soldiers and Sailors volumes (which are available online), where most of the data used in these SAR applications is from.  Chart the regiments and units mentioned.
  • Follow up on another source mentioned in a SAR #15669 concerning John Emery:  “Rev. Rolls, Mass. Archives, vol. 12, p. 115, vol. 19, p. 177.”  The Massachusetts State Archives is located in Dorchester.
  • Many pre-1970 SAR applications are now found on Ancestry.com so I can continue to access them.
  • Likewise Ancestry.com also houses some Revolutionary War rolls and I will continue to explore them.
  • Mr. Christian made a good suggestion about exploring town histories that include military information.  One such book that I have used is Sawtelle’s History of the Town of Townsend.
  • I believe the only soldier mentioned here who got a pension (it went to his widow) was John Emery.  I will continue to investigate pension records on Fold3.com and other places.
  • Continue reading two books that are throwing a lot of light on this subject:  “1776” by David McCullough and “The Minutemen and Their World” by Robert A. Gross.

Just a little more proof and this guy will be my ancestor!

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drawing from Edward Eggleston A First Book in American History (New York: American Book Company, 1889) 117

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