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Archive for the ‘Baldwin’ Category

I visited Townsend, the home of the Baldwins, Spauldings, Emerys and Gassets for the first time last week.

Since most of my mother’s ancestors lived within about 50 miles of Rhode Island, I will have an opportunity to visit each place they lived in many times.  This visit was just to familiarize myself with the town and visit the historical society and cemeteries.

It’s a Small Town

My first stop was a roadside antiques consignment shop on the way into town.  There I met a woman who was related to Richard N. Smith (said she was his cousin, but as genealogists know, that could mean anything), the author of the 1978 history of Townsend called “Divinity and Dust – A History of Townsend, Massachusetts.”  I told her if she got a chance to let him know how much I enjoyed the book.

While driving around, I had the wonderful experience of spotting streets named for many of my ancestors:  Spaulding Street, Emery Road, Jefts Street, Blood Road.

Townsend Historical Society

Townsend Historical Society located on Main Street in the Townsend Harbor section.

I next approached the Townsend Historical Society.  I didn’t have an appointment but was greeted cheerfully and shown into an office where I discussed what I was researching.  I was able to photograph some membership roles of the Congregational Church from 1847 and 1851.  My direct ancestors were out of Townsend by that time, but some aunts, uncles and cousins remained.  I recognized many of them in the lists.  I was asked not to reproduce those photographs here.

The Historical Society had some files, ephemera and other records but nothing that seemed to fit well with the family names and times I mentioned. But I was able to inquire about old Townsend newspapers and the nearest city newspapers.  I purchased a few small items which complete my set of written works on Townsend history (see bibliography below.) I purchased a black and white reproduction of this 1856 Townsend map.  I was invited to send in any queries that I might have in the future, and perhaps I will, since I have only just started with this group.

Hillside Cemetery

Hillside Cemetery

Next I visited Hillside Cemetery.  This cemetery is very big but for some reason I drove right up to the memorial I was looking for.  It carries the names of many of the siblings of my ggg-grandmother, Polly (Spaulding) Baldwin, 1806-1839.  It is a memorial to Miles Spaulding (1819-1896), who was a physician in nearby Groton, and is buried in Groton. It was placed by his widow; they had no children.  I wonder if this turn of the century marker replaced some older ones?  The earliest death on this memorial is 1834.

Capt. Isaac Spaulding, 1779-1834, Lucy Emery His Wife, 1788-1862, Ruth Spaulding, 1816-1899, Harriet N. Spaulding, 1822-1907, MILES SPAULDING

I never found the graves of my grandfather’s great grandparents, Eli and Polly (Spaulding) Baldwin.  But I knew the cemetery was recorded, section by section, in the Vital Records of Townsend Massachusetts book which I had on order, so I knew I could return with that another time and find everything.  My grandfather’s grandfather, Edward Baldwin, and his sister Catherine were left orphans when Eli and Polly died.  Polly’s siblings, particularly those mentioned on the marker above, did a lot for Catherine and Edward.  So I was touched to see that Catherine (Baldwin) Hunt (1834-1904) was buried in the same plot.  She and her husband, William Hunt, did not have any children.  I suspect Edward Baldwin died alone, and is not buried here.  But there is a lot still to learn about him.

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground, Earliest Known Burial – 1735

My last stop was the Old Burying Ground on Highland Street.  A more manageable size than Hillside, I examined every marker, and also referred to a list I had brought.  Even with that, I will need to refer to the Vital Records list and make a trip back.  Meanwhile, here is what I found.

Old Burying Ground, Townsend

My ggggg-grandfather John Emery (1754-1828):

In memory of Mr. John Emery, who died March 13, 1828 in the 75th year of his age

John’s father, my gggggg-grandfather Zachariah Emery, 1716-1804

In memory of Mr. Zachariah Emery who died 3 May 1804 aged 87 years.

My gggggg-grandfather Deacon Isaac Spaulding, 1710-1776

In memory of Dea. Isaac Spaulding who departed this life March 4, 1776 in the 66 year of his age. “Beneath this stone death’s prisoner lies, The stone shall move the prisoner rise; When Jesus with almighty word, Calls the dead saints to meet the Lord.”

My gggggg-grandmother, Sarah (Barrett) Spaulding (1714-1806), wife of Deacon Isaac:

In memory of Mrs. Sarah Spaulding widow of Dea. Isaac Spaulding who died 11 Feb 1806. In the 92 year of her age.

My ggggg-grandfather Lieut. Benjamin Spaulding, 1743-1832

In memory of Lieut. Benjamin Spaulding who died May 27, 1832. Aged 89.

My ggggg-grandfather Reuben Gassett, 1754-1822:

Erected in Memory of Reuben Gassett who died Dec. 18, 1822 AEt. 69. “Come! said Jesus’ sacred voice, Come, and make my paths your choice, I will guide you to your home, Worthy Pilgrim, heither come!”

Next Steps

  • Go through the cemeteries again with a better list in hand
  • Send some questions to the Historical Society
  • Explore newspaper resources
  • Locate several ancestral homes through the various books and maps available
  • Find military records for more of these ancestors

A Bibliography of Townsend Resources:

  • Hallowell, Henry C., (“transcribed and edited by”).  Vital Records of Townsend, Massachusetts, Town Records to 1850 with Marriage Intentions to 1873 and Cemetery Inscriptions.  Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1992.
  • The History of the Churches of Townsend, Mass.  Townsend: Townsend Historical Society, 1973. (44 pages)
  • Sawtelle, Ithamar B. History of the Town of Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, from the Grant of Hathorn’s Farm, 1676-1878.  Fitchburg, Mass.: Published by the Author, Press of Blanchard & Brown, 1878.
  • Smith, Richard N. Divinity and Dust, A History of Townsend, Massachusetts.  Lancaster, Mass: Richard N. Smith and the Townsend Historical Society, Printed at the College Press, 1978.
  • Town of Townsend, Incorporated June 29, 1732, 250th Anniversary.  Townsend Historical Society, 1982. (88 pages, mostly pictures)
  • Wornham, William.  The Last Muster: A Survey of the Civil War Veterans Buried in Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.  Second Ed., 1998. (36 pages)

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Using the new Massachusetts Town Vital Collections, 1620-1988 on Ancestry.com has, in one evening, turned up a lot of good information for me.  Admittedly, coverage is not complete, but the thing I like is that these are the original town records, not the transcribed records held more centrally by the state.  I have noticed handwritten notes near some records (like permission for a minor to marry) and some extra data that did not make the transcriptions.

Here are 5 things I discovered in an evening:

  • From the 4059-page Newton records, I found my uncle Blanchard Baldwin’s corrected birth record.  His first name, the slightly edited names of his parents, and a note had been added in a darker pen, saying that the updates were done on April 9, 1914.   That may have been when Blanchard joined the Navy. I’m sure the original birth record was incomplete because his mother died the next day.  It must have been a chaotic time.
  • My great-grandparent’s marriage record (ok, nothing new here, but my family might like to see it):

residence ... occupation

place of birth ... names of parents

  • Evidence that the “Grandma Ross,” who was my grandfather’s grandmother (he always referred to her maiden name as Spaulding) is the same Catherine Ross that was the mother of William Blackstone Bennett, Anna Jean Bennett, and Hattie Baldwin (they all listed her maiden name as “Youngs” in their own marriage records), since in her (third) marriage license, to Hiram Ross, she gives her maiden name as Youngs:
  • Catherine's portion of the marriage record to her third husband, Hiram Ross. Note that her maiden name is listed as Youngs and her parents are listed as "unknown" - I wonder why?

  • A death record for Aunt Hattie, who died in Wayland, Mass in 1933.  This record had eluded me before; I didn’t even have a death date.  Her mother is listed as Catherine Young … were my grandfather, and HIS father, the only people who thought her maiden name was Spaulding?
  • The second half of Hattie’s death record contained something I’ve been searching for since pretty much the first week I started genealogy – the origin of my mother’s family, the Baldwins.  Hattie’s death record shows that her father, Edward Baldwin, was born in Townsend, Massachusetts.  If it’s true, this is the biggest discovery made I’ve made in a long time.

    THIS IS THE BIG FIND - a place of birth for Edward Baldwin

  • As you can imagine, I moved on quickly to the Townsend records.  First I checked the map – Townsend is at the northern border of Massachusetts, north of Worcester.  This is roughly in the section of the state where I thought he might have been born.  Then I went through the Townsend birth records by index and page-by-page.  Then I checked several other places, and I don’t see a birth record.  However, I see Baldwins, I see at least one Miles family, and, more intriguingly, I see LOTS of Spauldings.  And it’s possible that Edward was located at some time in Townsend, or was born close by.  Despite a lack of a definite solution at this point I am thrilled, and have lots more to explore.

Tonight’s breakthrough was made possible by the work of Jay and Delene Holbrook, who compiled the Massachusetts records, over several decades, that now appear on Ancestry.  Thank you!

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Ted Baldwin

My mother would tell you that her father never talked much about his experiences during World War I driving an ambulance on the battlefields of France.  Talking choked him up and was just too difficult, although he did enjoy old songs from that era – “My Buddy”, “There’s a Long, Long Trail” and “Over There”.   But late in life, when maybe only the grandchildren were around, he did seem fond of talking about it.  I wish I could have those conversations back, to learn more about why he joined the medical unit instead of a regular Army unit, and to find out what troubled him so much that he didn’t talk about it for decades.  He mostly amused us with stories of learning a foreign language (“they don’t call it a hospital, it’s an oh-pee-tal”) and some grim references to the ever-present gangrene and mud.  I don’t ever recall him saying that his hearing was damaged by exposure to a bomb blast, and his health was compromised by mustard gas.  But it was something we all knew.

At Quonset, Tent #4: Bedford, Allen, Blais, Bresnan, Benoit, Baldwin

Miles Edward “Ted” Baldwin Jr. was born in April, 1893.  His mother died when he was 4 and he and his younger brother were not especially welcome in the home of their quickly-remarried father.  Grampa had a childless aunt and uncle that were fond of him and stayed close to him.  Perhaps it was the Civil War anecdotes of that uncle that made Grampa think that enlisting would be a good idea.  Was it his interest in science that steered him toward the medical unit?  Or was it a desire not to harm anyone?

At Camp Quonset, Allard, Allen, Baldwin, Avery, Benoit

Unfortunately Grampa’s military records were destroyed in the 1973 fire at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis.  So I am reconstructing the story from his discharge papers, photos, drawings and letters.

Ted enlisted in the Army on April 10, 1917 in Providence, Rhode Island.   He trained in Camp Quonset, Rhode Island.  U.S. Army, 26 Reg, 5th Div., First Rhode Island Ambulance. And notice – they are actually staying in tents.  According to something scrawled on the back of the photo, I believe they called themselves the “Rhode Island Ruff Necks”.  I’m sorry, Grampa, if 95 years later, that just seems adorable.

On the way to France, 1917

It was still 1917 when they boarded a train, then a ship, for France.  In France, Ted served in the Medical Department, Field Hospital 161, U.S. Army at Meuse-Argonne, Oise Aisne, Lorraine and Champaigne.

The few mementos from France are not as cheerful – a metal match box with German words “Gott Mit Uns”, a metal cigarette box, a souvenir scarf, a red cross armband.  His job was to bring the wounded off the battlefields and into the field hospitals.  I’m sure, many times, he wished he were back in the rural camp environment of Quonset.

Ted, like his whole family, was a bit of an artist.  The drawing from 1918 is entitled “Pill Rollers in the Argonne”.

“Pill Rollers in the Argonne”, Oct. 5, 1918

In Part 2, some sad souvenirs from France and three letters home, including one from the hospital. In Part 3, Ted returns home.

–Diane

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Anna Jean Bennett was born 16 Jul 1854 in Belmont (Allegany County), New York.

Anna Jean around age 50 with her niece Jennie May Bennett

Her parents were my great great grandmother, Catherine Yonge, and Catherine’s first husband, who was named either William or Thomas Bennett.  Anna Jean’s mother Catherine had three marriages:  (1) Bennett, which produced Anna Jean and her brother William Blackstone Bennett, (2) Edward Baldwin, which produced my g-grandfather Edward Baldwin and Harriet Elizabeth (Hattie) Baldwin and (3) Hiram Ross, a marriage that lasted many decades and ended when Catherine died.  I suspect Catherine’s first marriage ended in divorce, and the second by the death of her husband, but I have little or no proof.

Anna Jean lived in a rented house with her mom, mom’s second husband, and baby half-sister in 1860, at age 7, as reported in the 1860 Federal Census for Amity (Belmont Post Office), New York.  The family’s personal effects totaled $100 – an indication of near-poverty even in that rural community.  The stepfather was a lumber planer; there seemed to be several lumber mills nearby.

Of the hundreds of census records I have found relating to my family, this crucial one is probably the sloppiest and most perfunctory.  It was impossible to index correctly so I only found it after a page-by-page reading of the entire Amity, New York census.

Baldwin Federal Census record,1860

We can see “Ed Baldin” and “Cate”, both age 27; he works as a lumber planer, property valued at $100, born in Mass.  “Cate” is reported as born in New York (although that’s not true; in every other census she reports being born in England) and the children “Anna J” and “Hattie” were born in New York. Anna Jean attends school.  Anna Jean’s last name is Bennett but this was not noted.

Missing in this record is Anna Jean’s brother William.  Could he have been with his father, or was he just  omitted by (arguably) the worst census enumerator ever?  Sometimes William and Anna Jean gave their birthplace as Rochester, N.Y.  Could that have been true, or was it just a simple approximation for the western section of New York State?

I have not located any birth records for these children and its unlikely I ever will.  So I’m dependent on census records, and finding them very frustrating.  Even page-by-page perusals of certain Massachusetts and New York state census records reveal nothing in 1865.  In 1870, we find, in the Federal Census, mother Catherine married for the third time, in Massachusetts, and living with her new husband and Hattie, as well as my g-grandfather, Miles Edward, born in 1864. I don’t know what happened.  The Civil War was going on, but I find no record of Edward’s death.

But where was Anna Jean in 1870?  She would have been 17, and part of a now stable, but not wealthy, family that owned a small farm in Sterling, Mass. Three possibilities come to mind: (1) with her father and still-missing brother William, (2) away at school (seems unlikely) or (3) working and living in some other location.  Wherever she was, she should be in the federal census but I have not found her yet.

The next thing we know about Anna Jean is very surprising.  Let me give some background.  In her later life, Anna Jean married well and her husband was a conservative lawyer who became Chief Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court.  She and the judge were well known persons in our family and one prejudice of the judge’s that was repeated many times in family stories was his antipathy for divorce.  My grandfather – always a favorite with his aunt and uncle, the childless Anna Jean and the judge – carefully kept the news of his own divorce in 1929 from the judge who was on his death bed.  So imagine me on my hunt through the 1870’s looking for records of Anna Jean’s life and discovering that she had been, during that time, married and divorced.

Anna Jean Bennett married Harrison Gilley on 29 Jan 1873 in Sterling, Mass.

Anna Jean Bennett and Harrison Gilley

The reason I believe this is truly our Anna Jean is evidence found in the marriage record of Anna Jean and the judge in 1882:

Anna Jean and William Douglas

Note that this is listed as Anna Jean’s second marriage.  My mother could not have been more surprised.  I looked into Harrison Gilley’s life.  He was born into an aging sea captain’s family in Marblehead, Mass.  He had a twin brother named Henry (their names taken, I presume, from President William Henry Harrison who died in office in 1841, two years before their birth).  Harrison Gilley was a Civil War Navy veteran who had served as a nurse and surgeon’s steward, and after the war, worked as a druggist.  In the 1890’s he applied for a military disability pension.  The records – found on Footnote.org – show him to be a man of small stature who suffered numerous physical complaints.  Shortly after the pension was granted, he died from consumption.  His records say that he had been divorced and his wife was then living in Rhode Island.

Part of my difficulty with Aunt Jennie is that I have not found her census records from 1870 and 1880, which would fill in some details. When she married the judge in 1883, she was living in Newton, Mass.  During the 1880’s and 1890’s, her parents seemed to live both at the farm in Sterling and a rented residence in Newton where Hiram Ross was able to work for his cousin, who managed a cemetery.  On both of her marriage licenses, she listed no occupation.

I would like to find:

  • birth record for Anna Jean
  • 1870 & 1880 federal census for Anna Jean
  • record of divorce from Harrison Gilley
  • evidence of how Anna Jean met the judge

Next time, I’ll talk more about Aunt Jenny’s life after she married the judge.  I will not stop researching her until I know the story of how that little girl near the lumber mill in Belmont, NY built a life for herself that somehow brought her to an acquaintance, love and marriage with a socially prominent Rhode Island attorney, and a wealthy, travel-filled life.   And along the way, suffered through a marriage that had such difficulties that the judge didn’t hold the divorce against her.  Could Harrison Gilley have been gay?  deserted her?  a drug user (since he would have had access)?

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