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The most frequent query about Rhode Island genealogy is this: I have an ancestor with x name in x town (often in New York state or Vermont), born say, 1760 in Rhode Island, and I need to find the parents of this person. Solid evidence often exists in probate (say, an 1801 receipt for proceeds from an estate, signed by person x of x town, N.Y.). Often, the correspondent is aware of this possibility but will tell me “oh, I’ve searched on Ancestry but found no probate.”

Virtually ALL existing pre-1900 Rhode Island probate is online at Ancestry.com. They do not always have every part of the probate packets (sometimes you will want to gain access to additional records on FamilySearch.org) but they have enough to identify the recorded probate activities.

But searching on Ancestry won’t work in many cases. We need to tackle Ancestry in a completely different way. A paid account, or access through a local library, will be needed. What you are looking for is not any kind of summary or data, you are looking for the ORIGINAL probate pages, records, administration/guardianship records, inventories, auction lists, packets or receipts.

Here are the steps to FIND THE PROBATE RIGHT NOW:

  • Know what town you want. All R.I. probate is filed originally by town, but Ancestry lumps all the record sets for one county together, and, unfortunately, almost no record set has a title that includes the town name. So if you pull up Washington County, you will see dozens of record sets with no idea which sets belong to which town. Go to Rhode Island, Wills and Probate Records, 1582-1932. Find on the screen the “Browse this collection” link in the side column. 
  • Pull down the county name in the side column.

Rhode Island, Wills and Probate Records, 1582-1932. Choose the county then look for the exact title.

  • ALL the record sets for that county will come up in a long list below the county name (see all those arrows in my illustration, above). CHECK MY GUIDE at the bottom of THIS web page, the page you are on right now, find your county, find your town, and locate a useful record set, say, an index set, and remember the name of it. FIND that exact name in the box on Ancestry that is pictured and linked above. (When using Providence, give it time, the list of record sets is VERY long and takes a minute to show up).
  • If you found an index book, and now know a volume and page you need, use the same system of finding the titles by town, below, then locating the desired title under the county on Ancestry.

You CAN find your Rhode Island probate! After your first session or two trying this, you’ll realize it’s all there and you’ll get used to using this guide. Good luck with your probate research.

Four additional tips:

  • When possible, try to drill down by town on FamilySearch.org and uncover some probate packets or books not available on Ancestry. Often, those FamilySearch records are restricted to in-library use only.
  • Note that some of these record sets are EARLY TOWN RECORD BOOKS – those can be helpful and revealing too.
  • Remember, SOME digital indexing has been done, so try that, but it covers maybe 20% of names. Learn to make use of the original index pages from the books you will be perusing.
  • Sometimes, if a first name is unknown, you need to go through every probate during a time period for the last name you seek. You can do it! Also, for this problem, remember that heirs were often mentioned in the ORIGINAL book index pages – look for those!

BRISTOL COUNTY [All titles below will be found in a single list on Ancestry for Bristol County – this list helps you find the title you want.]

Barrington
  • Deed Records, Vol 13, 1882-1890; Vol 14, 1890-1891
  • Probate Index, Abatantuono, Ann-McCabe, Ann M,
  • Probate Index, McCabe, Ann M-Zukowski, William Joseph
  • Probate Records, Docket 1-7, 1874-1923
  • Town Council and Probate Records, Vol 1-4, 1830-1869
  • Town Council Records, Vol 1-4, 1770-1891
Bristol
  • Administration and Testamentary Letters, 1810-1871
  • Administrator Accounts, Vol 11-12, 1899-1920; Letters of Administrator, Vol 7-8, 1901-1917
  • Administrators Accounts, 1811-1852
  • Administrators Accounts, 1852-1870
  • Administrators Accounts, 1870-1877
  • Deeds, Wills, Inventories, Administrations, Grand Deeds and Grand Articles, 1680-1808
  • Estate Deeds, Vol 5, 1909-1917; Warrants, Vol 1, 1896-1916; Admin Account, Vol 11, 1892-1899; Etc
  • Inventories, Vol 1-4, 1811-1867
  • Letters of Administration, Vol 5, 1870-1906
  • Original Land Records, 1690-1703, 1886
  • Probate and Town Records, Vol 2-3, 1760-1825
  • Probate and Town Records, Vol 4, 1825-1838
  • Probate Bonds, 1817-1890 Probate Bonds, 1858-1885
  • Probate Index, Dixon, Ezra-Morris, Harriet P
  • Probate Index, Morris, Harriet P-Zych, John
  • Probate Records, Vol 6-8, 1855-1877
  • Wills, Inventories, 1746-1793
  • Wills, Inventories, 1746-1845
  • Wills, Inventories, 1845-1881
Warren
  • Accounts, 1832-1876; Commissioners Reports of Claims, 1843-1913
  • Accounts, Vol 11, 1878-1891; Vol 12, 1891-1912; Vol 13, 1912-1947
  • Bonds and Letters Testamentary, 1811-1836
  • Bonds, 1875-1892; Vol 3, 1892-1905; Vol 4, 1906-1917
  • Index to Vol 2-3 of Probate Proceedings, 1808-1851; Probate Proceedings, Vol 2, 1808-1839
  • Letters of Guardianship, 1840-1900; Letters and Bonds to Return Inventory, 1823-1839
  • Probate Index, Vol A-H, 1746-1859 Probate Index, Vol H-Z, 1746-1859
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 7-8, 1868-1879
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 9, 1825-1833; Probate Proceedings, 1819-1828, 1833-1839
  • Probate Records, Vol 12, 1892-1906; Vol 13, 1897-1904; Vol 14, 1904-1909; Vol 15, 1909-1914
  • Probate Records, Vol 14, 1903-1908; Vol 15, 1908-1911; Vol 16, 1911-1914; Vol 17, 1914-1916
  • Probate Records, Vol 17, 1916-1918
  • Wills and Inventories, Vol 1-2, 1746-1808 Wills and Inventories, Vol 3-4, 1806-1893
  • Wills, Vol 9, 1880-1890; Vol 10, 1902-1918

KENT COUNTY [All titles below will be found in a single list on Ancestry for Kent County – this list helps you find the title you want.]

Coventry

  • Probate Records, 1764-1824
  • Probate records, 1825-1841
  • Probate Records, 1841-1871
  • Probate Records, 1856-1932
  • Probate Records, 1869-1878
  • Probate records, v.10, 1878-1883
  • Probate Records, Vol 11-13, 1883-1906
  • Probate Records, Vol 14-15, 1906-1922

East Greenwich

  • Probate Files, 1-87, Adams-Brayton, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 88-178, Briggs-Congdon, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 179-243, Congdon-Freeborn, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 244-320, Freeborn-Hawkins, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 320-394, Hawkins-Kelly, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 394-447, Kelly-Mawney, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 447-524, Mawney-Pitcher, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 525-611, Pitcher-Spencer, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 612-695, Spencer-Wells, Early to 1885
  • Probate Files, 695-725, Wells-Wood, Early to 1885
  • Probate Index, Abar-Tortolani, 1872-2002
  • Probate Index, Tortolani-Zubee, 1872-2002
  • Probate Records, Vol 4-5, 1784-1819
  • Probate Records, Vol 6-7, 1819-1850
  • Probate Records, Vol 8, 1847-1875
  • Probate Records, Vol 9, 1875-1891
  • Town Council Records, 1865-1873

Warwick

  • Guardianship, 1896-1923 Testamentary, 1856-1891 Testamentary, 1891-1909 Testamentary, 1909-1931
  • Miscellaneous, 1839-1856; Administration, 1856-1932; Guardianship, 1856-1896
  • Probate Bonds, Vol 1, 1873-1889; Vol 2, 1885-1897; Vol 3, 1897-1905
  • Probate Bonds, Vol 4, 1895-1903; Vol 5, 1903-1908; Vol 6, 1908-1915
  • Probate Bonds, Vol 7, 1915-1921
  • Probate Docket Books, 1839-1925
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 13, 1907-1912; Vol 14, 1912-1918, 1947, 1955; Vol 15, 1918-1924, 1953
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 16, 1924-1938; Vol 17, 1925-1928; Vol 18, 1925-1934
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 19, 1918-1928; Vol 20, 1928-1930; Vol 21, 1928-1931
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 21, 1929-1931; Vol 22, 1929-1930; Vol 23, 1930-1931
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 8, 1876-1880; Vol 9, 1880-1881; Vol 10, 1882-1894
  • Town Council Records 1853-1877
  • Town Council Records Vol 1, 1742-1770
  • Town Council Records, Vol 3, 1804-1822
  • Town Council Records, Vol 7, 1870-1879
  • Wills and Probate Proceedings, 1804-1820
  • Wills and Probate Proceedings, 1820-1839
  • Wills and Probate Proceedings, 1839-1861
  • Wills and Probate Proceedings, 1861-1869
  • Wills and Probate Proceedings, 1869-1876
  • Wills, Vol 1, 1703-1745
  • Wills, Vol 2-4, 1745-1797
  • Wills, Vol 5-6, 1797-1816
  • Wills, Vol 7-8, 1816-1831
  • Wills, Vol 9-10, 1831-1847
  • Wills, Vol 11-12, 1845-1859
  • Wills, Vol 13-14, 1859-1868
  • Wills, Vol 15-16, 1868-1879
  • Wills, Vol 17-19, 1879-1898
  • Wills, Vol 20-22, 1898-1909
  • Wills, Vol 23-24, 1909-1917, 1953

West Greenwich

  • Wills, vol 6-10, 1822-1890

West Warwick

  • Docket 1913-1923; wills 1913-1919; bonds 1913-1919; letters of administration 1913-1923
  • Testamentary Letters, 1914-1923; Guardianship Letters, 1913-1923; Probate Proceedings, 1913-1924

NEWPORT COUNTY [All titles below will be found in a single list on Ancestry for Newport County – this list helps you find the title you want.]

Jamestown

  • Index to Land Evidence Records, Vol 1-14, 1680-1903
  • Probate Files, Carr, Isaac-Larkin, Eliz B
  • Probate Records, Vol 6-9, 1887-1915
  • Town Council and Probate Records and Index, Vol 2-4, 1767- 1874
  • Town Records, 1744-1796; Town Council Records, 1746-1766; Index

Little Compton

  • Town Council and Probate Records, Vol 1-2, 1746-1781
  • Town Council and Probate Records, Vol 8, 1832-1841; Probate Records, Vol 9-10, 1841-1854
    Vols. 14-15 (1900-1915)

Middletown

  • Books, Vol 12, 1894-1902; Vol 13, 1902-1908; Vol 14, 1908-1910
  • Cemetery Records; Wills, Early-1800; Wills, 1745-1894; Deaths and Marriages
  • Court Records, 1751-1785, 1813-1833
  • Docket 1, 1896-1936
  • Town Council Records, Vol 3-5, 1793-1838
  • Town Council Records, Vol 6-8, 1838-1879

Newport

  • General Probate Index, Vol A-B, 1779-1973
  • General Probate Index, Vol C-H, 1779-1973
  • General Probate Index, Vol I-R, 1779-1973
  • General Probate Index, Vol S-Z, 1779-1973
  • Index to Town Council Records
  • Index to Wills
  • Land Evidence Records, Vol 48-49, 1878-1880
  • Miscellaneous Records, 1701-1776
  • Probate Index, Aaron, Harry Solomon-Brown, Sophia Augusta
  • Probate Index, Abate, Salvatore A-Richmond, Henry I
  • Probate Index, Brown, Sophia Augusta-Crosby, Sarah C
  • Probate Index, Crosby, Sarah C-Francis, Hariet H
  • Probate Index, Francis, Harriet H-Hobbs, Caroline M
  • Probate Index, Hobbs, Caroline M-Limmer, Edward F
  • Probate Index, Limmer, Edward F-Mullaney, Johanna
  • Probate Index, Mullaney, Johanna-Ray, John Lewis
  • Probate Index, Ray, John Lewis-Sousa, Telma Garcia
  • Probate Index, Richmond, Henry I-Yetman, Walter Minor
  • Probate Index, Sousa, Telma Garcia-Virgadamo, Lucia G
  • Probate Index, Virgadamo, Lucia G-Zuill, Elizabeth W
  • Probate Records, Vol 10-11, 1834-1838
  • Probate Records, Vol 11, 1854-1876; Town Council Records, Vol 3, 1841-1880
  • Probate Records, Vol 12-13, 1838-1844
  • Probate Records, Vol 1-3, 1779-1802
  • Probate Records, Vol 19, 1858-1859
  • Probate Records, Vol 20-21, 1859-1863
  • Probate Records, Vol 22, 1862-1865
  • Probate Records, Vol 23-24, 1864-1867
  • Probate Records, Vol 28-29, 1872-1875
  • Probate records, vol 30, 1877
  • Probate Records, Vol 31-33, 1877-1880
  • Probate Records, Vol 41-43, 1887-1890
  • Probate Records, Vol 4-5, 1802-1819
  • Probate Records, Vol 48-50, 1894-1896
  • Probate Records, Vol 52-55, 1898-1900
  • Probate records, vol 55-57, 1900-1902
  • Probate Records, Vol 60-62, 1904-1906
  • Probate Records, Vol 62-64, 1906-1908
  • Probate Records, Vol 71-73, 1913-1915
  • Probate Records, Vol 8-9, 1818-1834
  • Town Council Records, Vol 12-16, 1756-1771
  • Town Council Records, Vol 1-3, 1702-1719
  • Town Council Records, Vol 17-18, 1702-1776
  • Town Council Records, Vol 4-7, 1714-1735
  • Town Council Records, Vol 8-11, 1735-1755

Portsmouth

  • Council and Probate Records, Vol 6-9, 1764-1822
  • Probate Bonds, 1829-1926
  • Probate Bonds, 1869-1926
  • Probate Index Cards, A-Z, 1700-1996
  • Probate Records, Vol 2-5, 1834-1868
  • Probate Records, Vol 6, 1845-1880
  • Town Council Records, Vol 10, 1822-1862
  • Town Council Records, Vol 13-15, 1893-1930

Tiverton

  • Appointment Book of Administrators, Borden, Benajah-End, 1830-1844; Vol 11-14, 1832-1876
  • Land Records, Vol 27, 1877-1879
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 2 and 4, 1747-1792
  • Probate Index, 1700-1902
  • Probate Records, Vol 13-14a, 1848-1866
  • Probate Records, Vol 14, 1866-1876
  • Probate Records, Vol 14-15, 1844-1850
  • Probate Records, Vol 15, 1876-1883
  • Probate Records, Vol 16, 1884-1890; Vol 17, 1890-1896; Vol 18, 1896-1902
  • Probate records, vol 2 and 4, 1747-1792; town council probate, 1776-1789; vol 5-6, 1792-1814
  • Town Council Records, Vol 1-4, 1776-1903
  • Town Council Records, Vol 5-6, 1903-1929
  • Town Meetings and Probate Records, 1776-1789; Town Meetings, 1804-1889

MISC:

  • A Book of Records For the Proprietors of the Lands Containing the Names of the First Proprietors
    Durfee and Stafford Genealogy and Allied Lines from 1600

PROVIDENCE COUNTY  [All titles below will be found in a single list on Ancestry for Providence County – this list helps you find the title you want.]

Burrillville

  • Administration Letters, Vol 1, 1907-1916; Warrants, Vol 1, 1896-1906; Bonds, Vol 1-2, 1873-1916
  • Letters of Guardianship, Administration, Testamentary, 1862-1917; Probate Bonds, 1873-1898
  • Probate Docket, Vol 1-2, 1900-1956; Wills, Vol 6, 1891-1916; Admin Letters, Vol 1, 1862-1907
  • Probate Journals Vol 1-3, 1806-1883
  • Probate Journals, Vol 4-6, 1883-1918; Probate Docket, Vol 1, 1896-1900
  • Probate Records, Vol 3-4, 1842-1871
  • Probate Records, Vol 5, 1871-1891
  • Town Meeting Records, 1806-1881

Cranston

  • Bonds to Probate Court, Vol 1, 1873-1892; Probate Index
  • Estate Files, 1064-1404
  • Estate Files, 1-372
  • Estate Files, 1405-1685
  • Estate Files, 1686-2074
  • Estate Files, 2075-2656
  • Estate Files, 2657-3090
  • Estate Files, 3096-3421
  • Estate Files, 3422-3687
  • Estate Files, 374-645
  • Estate Files, 648-1064
  • Inventories, 19, 1890-1899; 21, 1898-1905; 29, 1906-1911; 35, 1910-1913
  • Inventories, Reports, Accounts, Vol 16, 1873-1888; Wills, Vol 17, 1875-1894
  • Inventory, Accounts, Etc, Vol 10, 1849-1862; Admin and Guardianship Letters, Vol 11, 1849-1869
  • Letters of Administrator and Guardianship, Vol 14, 1867- 1892; Vol 15, 1873- 1887
  • Letters, 20, 1899-1919; Testamentary, 22, 1892-1915; Misc Bonds, 23-24, 1892-1914; 2, 1888-1896
  • Probate Bonds, 2 and 27, 1893-1923; Probate Bonds, 31 and 33, 1904-1919; Will, 25, 1892-1895
  • Probate Index, Aaronian, Evelyn H-Burton, Joseph
  • Probate Index, Burton, Joseph-Deluca, Giovanni
  • Probate Index, Deluca, Giovanni-Gill, William C
  • Probate Index, Gill, William C-Karnegie, Benjamin
  • Probate Index, Karnegie, Benjamin-McCann, Irene
  • Probate Index, McCann, Irene-Peterson, Annie
  • Probate Index, Peterson, Annie-Shaw, Harriet
  • Probate Index, Shaw, Harriet-Walton, Thomas
  • Probate Index, Walton, Thomas-Zwoden, Arden; Hildebrant, Katharine M; Hulton, Chester
  • Probate Records, Vol 12, 1861-1873; Inventories, Reports, Accounts, Vol 13, 1863-1874
  • Probate Records, Vol 1-4,1798-1832
  • Probate Records, Vol 5-7, 1832-1849
  • Probate Records, Vol 8, 1849-1861; Wills, Vol 9, 1849-1875
  • Records of Will, 25, 1895-1908; Records of Will, 32, 1908-1916
  • Town Council Records, 1754-1793
  • Town Council Records, 1854-1865
  • Town Council Records, 1865-1877

Cumberland

  • Letters, 1895-1925; Wills, 1905-1919; Probate Docket Book, Vol 1-2, 1896-1924
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, 1874-1923
  • Probate Records, Vol 21-23, 1856-1866
  • Probate Records, Vol 24-25, 1866-1877
  • Probate Records, Vol 26-27, 1877-1885
  • Probate Records, Vol 28-30, 1885-1891
  • Probate Records, Vol 31-34, 1894-1916
  • Probate Records, Vol 6-10, 1784-1815

East Providence

  • Assignment of Wages, Vol 1-2, 1885-1939; Inventories, Vol 3-4, 1889-1906
  • Deed Records, Vol 1, 1862-1879; Vol 2, 1879-1896
  • Letters, Vol 2-4, 1882-1923; Vol 1-2, 1862-1935; Vol 3-4, 1896-1916; Wage Assignment, Vol 1, 1885
  • Probate Bonds, Vol 3-5, 1894-1941; Probate Warrants, Vol 1-2, 1899-1917
  • Probate Court Bonds, 1873-1885
  • Probate Court Journal; Letters of Guardianship, 1862-1892
  • Probate Docket, Vol 1-3, 1896-1920; Probate Journal, Vol 3-4, 1892-1901
  • Probate Index, Abajian, Charles-Cooke, Charlotte, 1862-1998
  • Probate Index, Cooke, Charlotte-Harrington, Francis 1862-1998
  • Probate Index, Harrington, Francis-McGuigan, Matthew, 1862-1998
  • Probate Index, McGuigan, Matthew-Rose, Adelaide G, 1862-1998
  • Probate Index, Rose, Adelaide G-Zwolinski, Florence 1862-1998
  • Probate Journal, Vol 4, 1901-1904; Vol 5, 1904-1910; Vol 6, 1910-1915; Vol 7, 1915-1919
  • Probate Wills, Vol 2-3, 1894-1917; Probate Bonds, Vol 2-3, 1885-1897
  • Wills and Letters Testamentary, 1862-1894

Foster

  • Deeds, Vol 17-19, 1893-1900
  • Foster Historical Cemeteries
  • Probate Records, Vol 10, 1864-1873
  • Probate Records, Vol 1-2, 1781-1814
  • Probate Records, Vol 12-14,1888-1915
  • Probate Records, Vol 3-4, 1814-1826
  • Probate Records, Vol 5-6, 1826-1836
  • Probate Records, Vol 7-9, 1836-1864

Gloucester

  • Town Council Records, 1731-1892

Johnston

  • Executor, Administrations, Guardianship Records, 1826-1898
  • Letters of Administration, Wills, Inventories, Etc, 1840-1882
  • Probate Records, Minute Books, Inventories, and Commissioners Reports, 1871-1898
  • Town Council Meeting Records, 1772-1817
  • Wills, Inventories, Etc, 1759-1817
  • Wills, Inventories, Etc, 1798-1852
  • Wills, Inventories, Etc, 1821-1870
  • Wills, Inventories, Etc, 1882-1898
  • Wills, Inventories, Letters of Administration, Etc, 1871-1889

Lincoln

  • Probate docket and index, 1895-1915; Wills and index, 1895-1915; Inventories, 1895-1915
  • Probate Mtgs, Vol 1, 1895-1915; Admin Bonds, Vol 2 and 4, 1895-1915; Testamentary, Vol 3, 1895-1915
  • Probate Records, Vol 18-21, 1890-1896
  • Probate Records, Vol 25-27, 1902-1904, 1904-1907, 1907-1909
  • Probate Records, Vol 28-30, 1909-1912, 1912-1913, 1914-1917

North Providence see Pawtucket

North Smithfield

  • Deed Index and Records, Vol 11, 1894-1901; Vol 12, 1894-1901; Vol 13, 1896-1900; Vol 15, 1897-1900
  • Probate Index, Greene, Marion Da-Zygmunt, Joseph

Pawtucket or North Providence  (these records are for one or the other; it was hard to distinguish)

  • Administrators Bonds, 1873-1889
  • Appraisers Warrants and Record of Accounts, 1873-1890
  • Council and Probate Records, Vol 1-4, 1799-1855
  • Council and Probate Records, Vol A-C, 1765-1828
  • Council Records, Vol 9-11, 1855-1874
  • Executors Bonds to Return Inventory, 1873- 1907
  • Guardianship Bonds, 1873-1905
  • Husbands, Guardians, Administrators, Other Probate Bonds, 1873-1905
  • Index to Probate Records, 1765-1874; Index to Council Records, 1765-1874
  • Letters Testamentary, 1873-1883; Probate Bonds, 1872-1874
  • Probate Docket, Vol 1, 1-2176, 1896; Vol 2, 3617-4737, 1898-1906; Vol 3, 4738-5713, 1906-1912
  • Probate Docket, Vol 12, 1895-1896; Vol 13, 1896-1897; Vol 14, 1897-1899
  • Probate Docket, Vol 15, 1896-1903; Vol 16, 1899-1905
  • Probate Docket, Vol 17, 1899-1900; Vol 18, 1900-1901; Vol 19, 1902-1903
  • Probate Docket, Vol 22, 1905-1906; Vol 23, 1906-1906; Vol 24, 1906-1908
  • Probate Docket, Vol 29, 1910; Vol 30, 1910-1911; Vol 31, 1911; Vol 32, 1912
  • Probate Docket, Vol 33, 1912-1913; Vol 34, 1913; Vol 35, 1913-1914; Vol 36, 1914
  • Probate Docket, Vol 37, 1914-1915; Vol 38, 1915; Vol 39, 1915-1916
  • Probate Docket, Vol 4, 1877-1880; Vol 5, 1880-1883
  • Probate Docket, Vol 4, 5714-6791, 1912-1926
  • Probate Docket, Vol 9, 1889-1891; Vol 10, 1891-1893; Vol 11, 1893-1895
  • Probate Files, 1, 5-85
  • Probate Files, 1079-1185,
  • Probate Files, 1185-1230,
  • Probate Files, 1230-1256,
  • Probate Files, 1256-1365,
  • Probate Files, 1365-1471,
  • Probate Files, 144 (2)-198,
  • Probate Files, 1471-1570,
  • Probate Files, 1570-1655,
  • Probate Files, 1655-1733,
  • Probate Files, 1733-1811,
  • Probate Files, 1811-1887
  • Probate Files, 1887-1973
  • Probate Files, 1973-2070
  • Probate Files, 198-281,
  • Probate Files, 2071-2147
  • Probate Files, 2148-2207
  • Probate Files, 2208
  • Probate Files, 281-371,
  • Probate Files, 371-457,
  • Probate Files, 458-544,
  • Probate Files, 544-639
  • Probate Files, 640-725
  • Probate Files, 726-858
  • Probate Files, 85-144 (1)
  • Probate Files, 858-973
  • Probate Files, 973-1079
  • Probate Records Index, A-Camoes, Mary
  • Probate Records Index, Camp-Fitzsimons, Wam
  • Probate Records Index, Fl-Gizelsky, A
  • Probate Records Index, Li-Pakuris, Nicholas
  • Probate Records Index, Pal-Tavernier, Kevin
  • Probate Records Index, Tay-Z
  • Probate Records, 1862-1877
  • Probate Records, Vol 11-12, 1865-1871
  • Probate Records, Vol 13-14, 1870-1874
  • Probate Records, Vol 9-10, 1855-1865
  • Record of Wills, Vol 1-2, 1870-1897
  • Record of Wills, Vol A31, 1897-1902

Providence

  • Administration Accounts, 10, 1843-1848; 11, 1849-1851; 12, 1851-1854
  • Administration Accounts, 14, 1856-1858; 13, 1854-1856; 15, 1858-1860
  • Administration Accounts, 16, 1860-1862; 17, 1862-1864; 18, 1864-1866
  • Administration Accounts, 19, 1866-1868; 20, 1868-1869; 21, 1869-1872
  • Administration Accounts, 22, 1872-1874; 23, 1874-1876; 24, 1876-1878
  • Administration Accounts, 26, 1880-1882; 25, 1878-1880; 27, 1882-1884
  • Administration Accounts, 28, 1884-1890; 29, 1891-1895; 30, 1896-1899
  • Administration Accounts, 4, 1832-1835; 5, 1835-1837; 6, 1837-1839
  • Administration Accounts, 7, 1839-1841; 8, 1841-1843; 9, 1842-1846
  • Administrators Records, 1898-1899
  • Commissioners Probate Reports, Vol 1-3, 1820-1878; Miscellaneous Commissioner Reports, 1898-1899
  • Index to Probate Records, 1646-1899 [copy of a printed book]
  • Indexes to Wills, Vol O, 1872-1886; Vol 1, 1886-1897; Vol 2, 1901-1906; Vol 3, 1905-1914
  • Indian deeds, 1659-1662
  • Letters of Administration and Guardianship, 1804-1840
  • Letters of Guardianship, 1840-1864
  • Letters of Guardianship, 1864-1889
  • Letters of Guardianship, 1889-1898
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 10-12, 1872-1897
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 13-15, 1873-1898
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 1-5, 1873-1898
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 16-19, 1873-1899
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 20-22, 1873-1893
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 23-26, 1873-1899
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 28-30, 1890-1899
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 31-38, 1893-1899
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 39-41, 1896-1899
  • Miscellaneous Bonds, Vol 6-9, 1872-1897
  • Miscellaneous Files, A4802, 1823-1888
  • Miscellaneous Guardians, 1898-1899
  • Probate Docket Books, Vol 35-37, 12001-14450, 1909-1912
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 15-18, 12426-15149, 1879-1886
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 19-21, a15150-A17754, 1886-1891
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 22, a17755-A18992, 1703-1883; Vol 23-24, 1-2000, 1891-1894
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 25-27, 2001-5000, 1894-1899
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 28-30, 5001-8000, 1899-1903
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 31-33, 8001-11000, 1903-1907
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 34, 11001-12000 1907-1909
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 37-39, 14450-17000, 1912-1915
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 40-42, 17001-18500, 1915-1916
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 43-44, 18501-19500, 1917-1918; Vol 45, 19501-2000, 1918-1919
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 46-48, 20001-21500, 1919-1920
  • Probate Dockets of Estates, Vol 49, 21501-22000, 1920-1921
  • Probate Dockets, Vol 10-12, 9103-11078
  • Probate Dockets, Vol 1-3, 1-4596
  • Probate Dockets, Vol 13-14, 11079-12425
  • Probate Dockets, Vol 4-6, 4597-6902
  • Probate Dockets, Vol 7-9, 6903-9102
  • Probate Files, A1-A484, 1646-1885
  • Probate Files, A485-A881, 1646-1885
  • Probate Files, A882-A1200, 1769-1785, 1898
  • Probate files, A1040, A1403, A1416, 1779-1788; A1455-A1583, 1794-1797
  • Probate Files, A1201-A1454, 1785-1794
  • Probate Files, A1584-A1630, 1797-1799
  • Probate Files, A1680-A1730, 1799
  • Probate Files, A1680-A1730, 1799-1800
  • Probate Files, A1888-A1981, 1800-1812Probate Files, A1982-A2058, 1897-1899
  • Probate Files, A2058-A2132
  • Probate Files, A2133-A2330, 1826-1850
  • Probate Files, A2330-A2440, 1850-1855
  • Probate Files, A2441-A2541, 1854-1861
  • Probate Files, A2542-A2663, 1861-1876
  • Probate Files, A2664-A2788, 1867-1874
  • Probate files, A2789-A2912, 1874-1877
  • Probate Files, A2913-A3046, 1880-1885
  • Probate Files, A3047-A3182, 1885-1890
  • Probate Files, A3183-A3350, 1890-1894
  • Probate Files, A3351-A3544, 1894-1888
  • Probate files, A3545-A3691, 1888-1804
  • Probate files, A3692-A3850, 1804-1808
  • Probate Files, A3851-A3971, 1809-1886
  • Probate Files, A3972-A4102, 1809-1810
  • Probate Files, A4103-A4200, 1814
  • Probate files, A4201-A4309, 1815-1816
  • Probate Files, A4310-A4411, 1816-1817
  • Probate Files, A4412-A4498, 1818
  • Probate Files, A4499-A4593, 1819-1823
  • Probate Files, A4594-A4717, 1820-1822
  • Probate Files, A4718-A4804, 1822-1826
  • Probate Files, A4805-A4889, 1826 4833
  • Probate Files, A4890-A4969, 1827-1828
  • Probate Files, A4969-A5047, 1826-1827
  • Probate Files, A5048-A5144, 1827-1828
  • Probate Files, A5145-A5229, 1828-1829
  • Probate Files, A5230-A5319, 1829-1831
  • Probate Files, A5320-A5385, 1831-1832
  • Probate Files, A5386-A5448, 1832
  • Probate Files, A5449-A5498, 1832-1835
  • Probate Files, A5499-A5551, 1835-1836
  • Probate Files, A5552-A5606, 1834-1836
  • Probate Files, A5606-A5660, 1836-1839
  • Probate Files, A5660-A5719, 1836-1839
  • Probate Files, A5720-A5776, 1836-1841
  • Probate Files, A5776-A5824, 1839-1841
  • Probate Files, A5824-A5872, 1839-1840
  • Probate Files, A5872-A5924, 1839
  • Probate Files, A5925-A5982, 1839-1845
  • Probate Files, A5982-A6035, 1840-1845
  • Probate Files, A6036-A6070, 1841-1842
  • Probate Files, A6071-A6123, 1841
  • Probate Files, A6124-A6168, 1841-1842
  • Probate Files, A6169-A6224, 1842-1843
  • Probate Files, A6224-A6274, 1843-1845
  • Probate Files, A6275-A6332, 1844
  • Probate Files, A6333-A6384, 1844-1845
  • Probate Files, A6385-A6441, 1845-1847
  • Probate Files, A6387-A6544, 1845-1847
  • Probate Files, A6441-A6486, 1846-1848
  • Probate Files, A6545-A6599, 1847
  • Probate Files, A6599-A6649, 1847-1848
  • Probate Files, A6650-A6699, 1847-1849
  • Probate Files, A6700-A6750, 1849-1850
  • Probate Files, A6751-A6777, 1849
  • Probate Files, A6778-A6825, 1850-1852
  • Probate Files, A6826-A6869, 1850-1852
  • Probate Files, A6870-A6908, 1850
  • Probate Files, A6909-A6948, 1850
  • Probate Files, A6949-A6988, 1851-1852
  • Probate Files, A6989-A7030, 1851-1852
  • Probate Files, A7031-A7060, 1852
  • Probate Files, A7061-A7105, 1855-1856
  • Probate files, A7106-A7149, 1852-1855
  • Probate Files, A7150-A7190, 1854-1861
  • Probate Files, A7191-A7236, 1854
  • Probate files, A7237-A7254, 1854
  • Probate Files, A7275-A7317, 1854
  • Probate Files, A7318-A7536, 1854-1855
  • Probate Files, A7357-A7400, 1855
  • Probate Files, A7401-A7450, 1855
  • Probate Files, A7451-A7494, 1855-1858
  • Probate Files, A7495-A7550, 1856
  • Probate files, A7551-A7597, 1856-1857
  • Probate Files, A7597-A7648, 1857-1865
  • Probate Files, A7649-A7690, 1857
  • Probate Files, A7691-A7738, 1857
  • Probate Files, A7738-A7787, 1857-1858
  • Probate Files, A7788-A7845, 1858
  • Probate Files, A7846-A7876, 1858-1859
  • Probate Files, A7877-A7910, 1858-1859
  • Probate Files, A7911-A7958, 1859
  • Probate Files, A7959-A7992, 1859
  • Probate Files, A7993-A8044, 1859-1861
  • Probate Files, A8045-A8092, 1860
  • Probate files, A8093-A8142, 1860
  • Probate Files, A8143-A8181, 1860-1861
  • Probate Files, A8182-A8232, 1861
  • Probate Files, A8233-A8289, 1861
  • Probate Files, A8290-A8322, 1861-1862
  • Probate Files, A8323-A8376, 1862
  • Probate Files, A8377-A8427, 1862-1867
  • Probate Files, A8428-A8467, 1863-1864
  • Probate Files, A8468-A8519, 1863-1864
  • Probate Files, A8520-A8579, 1863
  • Probate Files, A8580-A8642, 1863-1864
  • Probate Files, A8643-A8704, 1864
  • Probate Files, A8705-A8759, 1864
  • Probate Files, A8760-A8818, 1864-1865
  • Probate files, A8819-A8879, 1865
  • Probate Files, A8880-A8922, 1865
  • Probate files, A8923-A8984, 1865-1867
  • Probate Files, A8985-A9044, 1866
  • Probate Files, A9045-A9104, 1866
  • Probate Files, A9105-A9173, 1866
  • Probate Files, A9174-A9219, 1866
  • Probate Files, A9220-A9271, 1867
  • Probate files, A9272-A9325, 1867
  • Probate Files, A9326-A9386, 1868
  • Probate Files, A9387-A9409, 1868
  • Probate Files, A9420-A9479, 1868
  • Probate Files, A9480-A9438, 1868
  • Probate Files, A9539-A9605, 1868-1869
  • Probate Files, A9606-A9662, 1869
  • Probate Files, A9664-A9731, 1869
  • Probate Files, A9732-A9771, A9773-A9797, 1869
  • Probate Files, A9798-A9867, 1870
  • Probate Files, A9868-A9939, 1869
  • Probate Files, A9940-A10017, 1869
  • Probate Files, A10018-A10090, 1869
  • Probate Files, A10091-A10150, 1870
  • Probate Files, A10151-A10228, 1871
  • Probate Files, A10229-A10309, 1871
  • Probate Files, A10310-A10367, 1872
  • Probate Files, A10368-A10423, 1872
  • Probate Files, A10424-A10504, 1872
  • Probate Files, A10505-A10584, 1872
  • Probate Files, A10585-A10644, 1872
  • Probate Files, A10645-A10725, 1873
  • Probate Files, A10726-A10802, 1873
  • Probate Files, A10803-A10882, 1873
  • Probate Files, A10883-A10966, 1874
  • Probate Files, A10967-A11065, 1874
  • Probate Files, A11088-A11151, 1874-1875
  • Probate Files, A11152-A11233, 1875
  • Probate Files, A11234-A11329, 1875
  • Probate Files, A11330-A11415, 1875
  • Probate Files, A11416-A11508, 1876
  • Probate Files, A11509-A11590, 1876
  • Probate Files, A11591-A11679, 1877
  • Probate Files, A11680-A11768, 1877
  • Probate Files, A11769-A11853, 1877
  • Probate Files, A11854-A11932, 1877
  • Probate Files, A11933-A12004, 1877
  • Probate Files, A12005-A12100, 1877
  • Probate Files, A12101-A12175, 1877
  • Probate Files, A12176-A12270, 1878
  • Probate Files, A12271-A12351, 1878-1879
  • Probate Files, A12352-A12437, 1879
  • Probate Files, A12438-A12524, 1879
  • Probate Files, A12525-A12612, 1879
  • Probate Files, A12613-A12699, 1880
  • Probate Files, A12699-A12775, 1880
  • Probate Files, A12776-A12869, 1880-1881
  • Probate Files, A12870-A12946, 1881
  • Probate Files, A12947-A13017, 1881
  • Probate Files, A13018-A13094, 1881
  • Probate Files, A13095-A13170, 1882
  • Probate Files, A13171-A13254, 1882
  • Probate Files, A13255-A13331, 1882
  • Probate Files, A13331-A13423, 1882
  • Probate Files, A13424-A13515, 1882
  • Probate Files, A13516-A13593, 1883
  • Probate Files, A13594-A13673, 1883
  • Probate Files, A13674-A13766, 1883
  • Probate Files, A13767-A13842, 1883
  • Probate Files, A13843-A13929, 1883
  • Probate Files, A13930-A14016, 1883-1884
  • Probate Files, A14017-A14099, 1884
  • Probate Files, A14118-A14180, 1884
  • Probate Files, A14181-A14251, 1884
  • Probate Files, A14252-A14330, 1884-1885
  • Probate Files, A14331-A14417, 1885
  • Probate Files, A14418-A14501, 1885
  • Probate Files, A14502-A14569, 1885
  • Probate Files, A14570-A14657, 1885
  • Probate Files, A14658-A14760, 1885
  • Probate Files, A14761-A14843, 1886
  • Probate Files, A14843-A14933, 1886
  • Probate Files, A14934-A15017, 1886
  • Probate Files, A15018-A15104, 1886
  • Probate Files, A15105-A15196, 1886-1887
  • Probate Files, A15197-A15286, 1887
  • Probate Files, A15287-A15375, 1887
  • Probate Files, A15376-A15455, 1887
  • Probate Files, A15456-A15550, 1887
  • Probate Files, A15551-A15644, 1887
  • Probate Files, A15644-A15737, 1887
  • Probate Files, A15738-A15831, 1887-1888
  • Probate Files, A15832-A15920, 1888
  • Probate Files, A15921-A16008, 1888
  • Probate Files, A16009-A16090, 1888
  • Probate Files, A16091-A16174, 1889
  • Probate Files, A16175-A16276, 1889
  • Probate Files, A16277-A16387, 1889
  • Probate Files, A16388-A16478, 1889
  • Probate Files, A16480-A16575, 1889
  • Probate Files, A16576-A16661, 1889
  • Probate Files, A16662-A16735, 1889
  • Probate Files, A16736-A16821, 1890
  • Probate Files, A16798-A16865, 1890
  • Probate Files, A16865-A16927, 1890
  • Probate Files, A16927-A17006, 1890
  • Probate Files, A17006-A17078, 1890
  • Probate Files, A17078-A17146, 1890
  • Probate Files, A17146-A17224, 1890
  • Probate Files, A17224-A17304, 1890
  • Probate Files, A17304-A17377, 1890-1891
  • Probate Files, A1731-A1750, 1799-1800
  • Probate Files, A17377-A17461, 1890-1891
  • Probate Files, A17461-A17522, 1891
  • Probate Files, A1750-A1888, 1899
  • Probate Files, A17522-A17591, 1891
  • Probate Files, A17591-A17669, 1891
  • Probate Files, A17669-A17747, 1891
  • Probate Files, A17747-A18144, 1828-1848
  • Probate Files, A18144-A18433, 1839-1862
  • Probate Files, A18433-A18632, 1862-1875
  • Probate Files, A18632-A18867, 1875-1884
  • Probate Files, A18867-A19035, 1884-1899
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 1, 1819-1824; Vol 2, 1824-1828; Vol 3 1828-1834
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 12, 1857-1859; Vol 13, 1859-1862; Vol 14, 1862-1865
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 15, 1865-1867; Vol 16, 1867-1870; Vol 17, 1870-1873
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 18, 1873-1876; Vol 19, 1876-1878; Vol 20, 1878-1881
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 21, 1881-1883; Vol 22, 1883-1885; Vol 23, 1885-1888
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 24, 1888-1890; Vol 25, 1890-1893; Vol 26, 1893-1898
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 26-28, 1878-1882
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 27, 1892-1893; Vol 28, 1894-1896
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 29, 1896-1898; Vol 30, 1898-1899
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 29-31, 1882-1887
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 32-34, 1888-1891
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 35-37, 1891-1894
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 38-39, 1894-1896
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 4, 1834-1838; Vol 5, 1838-1841
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 40-41, 1896-1899
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 6, 1841-1844; Vol 7, 1844-1848; Vol 8, 1848-1850
  • Probate Inventories of Estates, Vol 9, 1850-1853; Vol 10, 1853-1855; Vol 11, 1855-1857
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 100, 1906-1908; Vol 101, 1885-1908; Vol 102, 1906-1908
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 103, 1908-1909; Vol 104, 1909; Vol 105, 1908-1909
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 109, 1910; Vol 110, 1910-1912; Vol 111, 1905-1911
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 11-12, 1845-1848
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 115, 1910-1911; Vol 116, 1911; Vol 117, 1911-1912
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 1-2, 1798-1817
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 121, 1907-1913; Vol 122, 1904-1913; Vol 123, 1911-1913
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 124, 1913; Vol 125, 1913-1914; Vol 126, 1913-1914
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 127, 1914; Vol 128, 1914-1915; Vol 129, 1903-1914
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 13, 1848-1850
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 130, 1914-1915; Vol 131, 1915; Vol 132, 1897-1915
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 133, 1915; Vol 134, 1915; Vol 135, 1915
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 136, 1914-1916; Vol 137, 1915; Vol 138, 1916
  • Probate proceedings, Vol 139, 1916; vol 140, 1916; vol 141, 1916
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 14-15, 1850-1853
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 142, 1916; Vol 143, 1916; Vol 144, 1916-1917
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 145, 1916-1917; Vol 146, 1916; Vol 147, 1917
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 148, 1917; Vol 149, 1917; Vol 150, 1917
  • Probate proceedings, Vol 151, 1917; vol 152, 1915-1917; vol 153, 1911-1918
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 154, 1914-1918; Vol 155, 1914-1918; Vol 156, 1916-1918
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 157, 1916-1918; Vol 158, 1918; Vol 159, 1915-1918
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 160, 1911-1919; Vol 161, 1919; Vol 162, 1919
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 16-17, 1853-1855
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 163, 1918; Vol 164, 1919; Vol 165, 1919
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 166, 1919-1920; Vol 167, 1919-1920; Vol 168, 1919-1920
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 18, 1855-1856
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 19-20, 1856-1858
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 21-22, 1858-1860
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 27-28, 1865-1868
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 29-30, 1868-1871
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 31-32, 1871-1874
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 33-34, 1874-1876
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 3-4, 1817-1828
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 35, 1876-1877; Vol 36, 1877; Vol 37, 1877-1878
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 41, 1882-1883; Vol 42, 1883-1884; Vol 43, 1884-1885
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 44, 1885-1886; Vol 45, 1886-1887; Vol 46, 1887
  • Probate proceedings, Vol 46, 1887-1888; vol 47, 1888-1889; vol 48, 1889
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 52, 1892-1892; Vol 53, 1892-1893; Vol 54, 1893
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 5-6, 1828-1836
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 61, 1897; Vol 62, 1897-1898; Vol 63, 1898
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 64, 1899; Vol 65, 1884-1899; Vol 66, 1892-1899
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 73, 1901; Vol 74, 1901; Vol 75, 1900-1902
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 7-8, 1836-1840
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 79, 1890-1903; Vol 80, 1903; Vol 81, 1903
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 82, 1903; Vol 83, 1903-1904; Vol 84, 1904
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 88, 1882-1994; Vol 89, 1902-1905; Vol 90, 1905
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 91, 1899-1905; Vol 92, 1905; Vol 93, 1906
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 9-10, 1840-1845
  • Probate Proceedings, Vol 97, 1903-1907; Vol 98, 1907; Vol 99, 1895-1907
  • Wills and Index, Vol 10-11 1805-1815
  • Wills and Index, Vol 12, 1815-1819
  • Wills and Index, Vol 13, 1819-1839
  • Wills and index, vol 14-15, 1836-1848
  • Wills and Index, Vol 16-17, 1848-1856
  • Wills and Index, Vol 18-19, 1856-1862
  • Wills and Index, Vol 20-21, 1861-1867
  • Wills and Index, Vol 22-23, 1867-1872
  • Wills and Index, Vol 24-25, 1872-1877
  • Wills and Index, Vol 3-4, 1726-1754
  • Wills and Index, Vol 5-6, 1754-1785
  • Wills and Index, Vol 7, 1785-1797
  • Wills and Index, Vol 8-9, 1796-1805

Scituate

  • Probate and Council Records, Vol 1-3, 1731-1799
  • Probate Records, Vol 13, 1905-1906; Vol 14, 1906-1912; Vol 15, 1913-1919
  • Probate Records, Vol 6, 1837-1848
  • Probate Records, Vol 9-10, 1865-1881
  • Town Council Records, Vol 5-6, 1820-1886

Smithfield

  • Abstracts Copied From Council and Probate Records 2
  • Council Journal, 1871-1877
  • Council Journal, Vol 5-6, 1822-1845
  • Probate Files, 1-99, 1871-1885
  • Probate Files, 99-171, 1871-1885
  • Probate Index, Abbatematteo, Kathleen Frances-Laposta, Maria, 1871-2003
  • Probate Index, Laposta, Maria-Zylinski, Mery, 1871-2003
  • Probate Records, Vol 11-12, 1859-1867
  • Probate Records, Vol 1-4, 1871-1912
  • Probate Records, Vol 2, 1749-1768
  • Probate Records, Vol 2, 1769-1797
  • Probate Records, Vol 3-4, 1791-1827
  • Probate Records, Vol 4-5, 1903-1921
  • Probate Records, Vol 5-6, 1826-1844
  • Probate Records, Vol 9-10, 1853-1859

Woonsocket

  • Probate Bonds, Vol 1, 1872-1883
  • Probate Files, 1-79
  • Probate Files, 79-161
  • Probate files, 162-265
  • Probate Files, 266-342
  • Probate Files, 343-425
  • Probate Files, 426-526
  • Probate Files, 527-601
  • Probate Index, Abatantuono, Constanza-Brien, Delphine
  • Probate Index, Brien, Delphine-Dulac, Madeleine
  • Probate Index, Dulac, Madeleine-Kappelle, Rosilda
  • Probate Index, Kappelle, Rosilda-McDonald, James H
  • Probate Index, McDonald, James H-Smith, Matilda S
  • Probate Index, Smith, Matilda S-Zydem, Simon
  • Probate Records, Vol 1-2, 1867-1878

Misc from Rhode Island Historical Society:

  • Genealogical Record Book, Vol I
  • Index to Cemetery Records, Wills, Record Books, Vital Records and Historical Events, Vol A [=Briggs Collection]
  • Index to the Probate Records, 1646-1899 [Providence]
  • Minutes and Acts of the General Council, 1667-1753
  • Probate Records and Index, to 1775 [Providence, a handwritten abstract]
  • Wills, Vol A-C [BRIGGS Collection]

WASHINGTON COUNTY [All titles below will be found in a single list on Ancestry for Washington County – this list helps you find the title you want.]

Charlestown

  • Probate Records, Vol 1-3, 1798-1837
  • Probate Records, Vol 4-6, 1837-1878
  • Town Council and Town Meeting Records, 1-67, 1787
  • Town Council and Town Meeting Records, 1788-1800

Exeter

  • Council and Probate Records, Vol 12-14, 1830-1850
  • Council and Probate Records, Vol 1-4, 1743-1786
  • Council and Probate Records, Vol 15-17, 1850-1878
  • Council and Probate Records, Vol 5-8, 1786-1816
  • Council and Probate Records, Vol 9-11, 1816-1830
  • Exeter, Rhode Island, death records and index: 1903-1915

Hopkinton (lucky Hopkinton researchers can bypass all this by using the transcribed records from the Hopkinton Historical Association (free!) – Probate 1757-1850 HERE). 

  • Bonds, Vol 1-3, 1872-1915; Docket Books, Vol 1-2, 1895-1928
  • Probate Index Cards, 1757-1993
  • Probate Records, Vol 11-12, 1862-1876
  • Probate Records, Vol 13-14, 1876-1888
  • Probate Records, Vol 15-16, 1888-1898
  • Probate Records, Vol 1-6, 1751-1841
  • Probate Records, Vol 17-18, 1899-1911
  • Probate Records, Vol 19, 1911-1920
  • Probate Records, Vol 7-10, 1839-1863
  • Town Records, 1743-1920

Narragansett

  • Probate Bonds, Vol 1, 1899-1908; Vol 2, 1908-1915
  • Probate Files, Annie Thompson Case 10-Edward J Davis Case 61, 1800-1915
  • Probate Files, Edward J Davis Case 61-James A Northup, 1800-1915
  • Probate Files, Edward W Watts-Radel Andrew, 1800-1915
  • Probate Files, James A Northup-Edgar W Watts, 1800-1915
  • Probate Files, Rose, Joshua-Wright, Thomas
  • Probate Records and Index, Vol 1 1884-1901; Vol 2 1898-1913; Vol 3 1913-1915

New Shoreham (Block Island)

  • Probate books, vol A-C, 1798-1840
  • Probate Books, Vol H-I, 1902-1923
  • Probate Files Early-1885, Coe, Benjamin T-Littlefield, Nathaniel (Guardian)
  • Probate Files Early-1885, Littlefield, Nathaniel (Guardian)-Rose, John

North Kingstown

  • Death records, vol 5, 1910-1915
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 14-20, 1796-1817
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 21-25, 1817-1829
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 26-29, 1829-1845
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 30-32, 1845-1858
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 33-36, 1858-1871
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 5-8, 1692-1756
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 9-13, 1756-1795
  • Probate Index, 1696-1903
  • Probate Index, Abbott, Marie-Guada, Marlene Iris, 1896-1997
  • Probate Index, Guada, Marlene Iris-Zwolinski, John, 1896-1997
  • Probate Records, Vol 39, 1877-1881; Vol 40, 1881-1885
  • Probate Records, Vol 40, 1885-1886; Vol 41, 1886-1889; Vol 42, 1862-1893; Vol 43, 1894-1895
  • Probate Records, Vol 43-47, 1895-1923
  • Probate Records, Vol 47, 1907-1924; Vol 48, 1918-1924; Vol 49, 1915-1933
  • Probate records: Bonds 1 (1873-1890) ; bonds 2 (1890-1907) ; docket 2 (1896-1930) ; index 1 A – Z (books 1-45) 1696-1907.

Richmond

  • Index of Land Evidence, Vol 2, 1853-1935; Land Deeds, 1896-1900
  • Probate and Town Records, Vol 10-12, 1861-1877
  • Probate and Town Records, Vol 1-3, 1747-1783, 1812-1818
  • Probate and Town Records, Vol 4-6, 1818-1834
  • Probate and Town Records, Vol 7-9, 1834-1861
  • Probate Bonds, 1873-1914

South Kingstown

  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 4-5, 1743-1772
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 6-7, 1772-1854
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 6-7, 1825-1863
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 8-10, 1863-1876
  • Probate and Town Council Records, Vol 8-9, 1854-1886
  • Town Council Records Index, 1704-1917
  • Town Council Records Index, 1705-1943

Westerly

  • Estates, Vol 1, 1872-1888; Vol 2, 1888-1906; Vol 3, 1906-1915; Vol 4, 1915-1916
  • Indexes of Town, Land, Probate, and Vital Records, 1661-1745
  • Probate Files, Drawer 3
  • Probate Files, Drawer 4
  • Probate Files, Drawers 1 and 2
  • Probate Records Index, Abbossa, Rosa-Lysobey, Daniel
  • Probate Records Index, McAndrew, Joseph L-Zippo, Theresa M
  • Probate Records, Vol 2-3, 1811-1841
  • Probate Records, Vol 4, 1832-1852
  • Probate Records, Vol 5-6, 1853-1877
  • Probate Records, Vol 7, 1874-1885; Vol 8, 1882-1889; Vol 9, 1888-1894
  • Town and Council Special Proceedings, Vol 1, 1869-1888; Town Meeting Record, 1669-1694, 1818-1904
  • Town Council and Probate Records, Vol 2-4, 1699-1736
  • Town Council and Probate Records, Vol 5-6, 1745-1787
  • Town Council and Probate Records, Vol 7-8, 1787-1818

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The Rhode Island Heritage Commission (now merged with the Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission) produced numerous interesting booklets about the diverse ethnic heritage communities in Rhode Island. Published a few decades ago, they are now available online.

These little booklets offer an historical perspective on the communities and neighborhoods as they developed in Rhode Island along with illustrations including some maps, churches, portraits and street scenes although the images did not reproduce well in these copies.

Each volume offers a valuable bibliography (from a few decades back) which may point out some lesser-known resources for the history of these groups.

Follow the links to the volumes, below, or see the whole set at the RIHPC website.

The full list of booklets:

The Arabic-Speaking People in Rhode Island (1986)
The Armenians in Rhode Island (1985)
The Cape Verdeans in Rhode Island (1990)
The French in Rhode Island (1988)
The Germans in Rhode Island (1985)
The Greek People in Rhode Island (1994)
The Irish in Rhode Island (1986)
The Italians in Rhode Island (1990)
The Jews in Rhode Island (1985)
The Lithuanians in Rhode Island (1992)
The Portuguese in Rhode Island (1985)
The Southeast Asians in Rhode Island (1988)
The Ukrainians in Rhode Island (1988)

Although these booklets will seldom name individuals and definitely don’t contain any records, they are a guide to the kind of background and history that’s needed for setting a family’s story in the perspective of time and place.

See also my prior listing for the town-by-town guides to historic neighborhoods and architecture: A Sense of Place.

Thanks to Sara Campbell for alerting me to the appearance of these ethnic heritage books online.

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Rhode Island medical history

The Rhode Island Medical Society has published the Rhode Island Medical Journal for over 100 years. Every issue is interesting and might contain something helpful such as a mention or obituary if your ancestor was part of the medical community.

Former home of the Rhode Island Medical Society, Francis Street, Providence.
“Rhode Island Medical Society Library Building,” VM013_GF3185, Rhode Island Photograph Collection, Providence Public Library, provlibdigital.org.

But one special section, “Heritage,” offers stories of Rhode Island’s medical past, on subjects that might easily include our broader set of ancestors: early hospitals, medical education, fresh-air schools, sanitariums, and military medical service. Maybe an article will give you insight into the experience of your ancestor.

The issues containing the articles listed below are located on the R.I. Medical Society website by using the “Archives” link on the Rhode Island Medical Journal page. Issues since 2001 are available there. All of this material is, of course, copyright protected. Some additional copies of this journal may be found at Archive.org.

For some early out-of-copyright issues, see this link on Hathitrust. For an earlier journal, also called the Rhode Island Medical Journal, 1900-1917, see this page on Hathitrust.

Stories of interest to genealogists

Stories of interest to genealogists in the last two decades are listed below. Click through to the journal, go to Archives, and find the issue.

  • 100 Years Ago – Dr. Harriet Alleyne Rice of Newport: The struggles of an African-American physician. Her brother George pursued medicine in Scotland under Dr. Joseph Lister. By Mary Korr. 98:1 (Jan 2015)
    • Dr. Rice was the first African-American woman to graduate from Wellesley College, in 1887
  • The Purloined Corpse: A Winter’s Tale. By Mary Korr. 98:2 (Feb 2015)
    • A 1799 death was followed by grave robbing and a far-ranging Rhode Island scandal
  • Ramon Guiteras, MD: Surgeon, Statesman, Big-Game Hunter. Bristol native founded the American Urological Association. By Mary Korr. 98:3 (Mar 2015)
    • A graduate of Harvard Medical School, Dr Guiteras had a marital connection to the Wardwells
  • 100 Year Ago – July 1915: A Floating Hospital for Children Launches in Narragansett Bay: Chair of RIMS pediatric section heads the medical effort. By Mary Korr. 98:7 (Jul 2015)
    • A day trip for city children and their mothers launched The Floating Hospital Association and, eventually, a summer camp called “Sunshine Island.”
  • A Century Ago, Fresh Air Camp Opens for Consumptives in Foster. By Mary Korr. 98:8 (Aug 2015).
    • The story of Pine Ridge Camp, opened in 1903
Charles V. Chapin. The Sources and Modes of Infection. John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1910.
  • Charles V. Chapin, MD: ‘Dean of City Health Officers.’ By Mary Korr. 98:9 (Sep 2015).
    • Dr Chapin, Providence’s second superintendent of health beginning in 1884, is a recognizable name to genealogists, but he was also an influential force in the field of public health
  • 1780: American dentistry had its roots in RI during the Revolution. By Mary Korr. 98:11 (Nov 2015).
    • At a military hospital in Brown’s University Hall, a French dentist trained two Rhode Islanders in the art of dentistry
  • The early physicians of Washington and Kent Counties: They fought in Civil War, served on Supreme Court, rounded on horseback. By Mary Korr. 99:1 (Jan 2016).
    • Tales of some early physicians, including a few women
  • The Leper Boy of Pawtucket: Mass. leper colony off nearby New Bedford, Mass., refuses to accept patient. By Mary Korr. 99:2 (Feb 2016).
    • Massachusetts refused to treat Harry Sheridan of Darlington, so Rhode Island placed the boy in the empty Pawtucket Pest House for the remainder of his life
  • 1916: RI doctors mobilized on Mexican border in hunt for Pancho Villa. By Mary Korr. 99:3 (Mar 2016).
    • R.I. National Guard units served in the Mexico Punitive Expedition
  • Haines State Park: The Fresh-Air Legacy of Dr. George B. Haines. By Mary Korr. 99:2 (Feb 2016).
    • A Valley Falls doctor leaves a lasting legacy with his retirement home in Barrington
  • The graduates of the first medical school at Brown: 1811–1826. By Mary Korr. 99:5 (May 2016).
    • Some background, pictures, and reference to a helpful issue of Rhode Island Historical Tracts
  • A Last Hurrah: Memorial’s Nurse Alumni Association Celebrates Centennial. By Susan McDonald. 99:6 (Jun 2016).
    • Includes photographs and details of the nursing school in Pawtucket, Rhode Island
  • 1915: Poison Pies on the Fourth of July Create Panic in Westerly & Stonington, CT. By Mary Korr. 99:7 (Jul 2016).
    • Mysterioius deaths resulted from eating pie at Alexander Ray Gavitt’s restaurant
  • Fighting TB with Fresh-Air Schools: RIMS’ doctors launch a movement. By Mary Korr. 99:9 (Dec 2016).
    • Doctors Mary S. Packard and Ellen A. Stone launched the nation’s first fresh air schol for tubercular children in Providence, 1908
Newport Hospital in Rhode Island.jpg
Newport Hospital, from an early post card.

Some 2017 issues featured a section of historical ads, news, and stories from the past.

  • Some highlights:
    • A Chronology of Rhode Island Hospitals. Also, Rhode Island’s First Hospitals By Stanley Aronson. 100:1 (Jan 2017)
      • A look at the formation of each Rhode Island hospital
    • Unique hospitals dotted RI medical land and seascapes in 1917. By Mary Korr. 100:2 (Feb 2017)
      • Some private facilities and even a quarantine vessel are detailed
    • Poster for the U.S. Army Medical Department, 1917. 100:3 (Mar 2017)
    • American Red Star Animal Relief forms first branch in Providence. By Mary Korr. 100:4 (Apr 2017)
      • Caring for sick and disabled Army horses and mules; image of poster included
    • Hopeworth Sanitarium in Bristol offered rest and work cures: Founder grew up in Civil War field hospitals, orphan asylum. By Mary Korr. 100:6 (Jun 2017).
      • The story of a Bristol private sanitarium
    • Images from the Past. 100:7 (Jul 2017).
      • Features nurses marching on Arminstice Day, 1923, and the 1920’s dining hall of the Cranston State Hospital
    • Practicing Medicine in 1917 Rhode Island. by Todd M. Olszewski, PhD. 100:12 (Dec 2017)
      • Highlights of Rhode Island medicine during an eventful era
  • December 1917: RI Medical Teams Rush to Halifax Disaster: Described as the most devastating pre-atomic blast ever recorded. By Mary Korr. 101: 9 (Nov 2018)
    • Dr. Darrell Harvey led a team of medical personnel to his hometown of Halifax
  • Remembering Isaac Ray, MD, as Butler launches its 175th anniversary celebration: Past president of RIMS was pioneer in medical jurisprudence. By Mary Korr. 102:3 (Apr 2019)
    • The story of Dr. Isaac Ray
  • Vintage Ambulances: From horse-drawn to airborne. 102:4 (May 2019)
    • A photo collection
  • A Walking Cane Leads Down Memory Lane to Dr. Lewis Leprilete Miller. By Mary Korr. 102:6 (Aug 2019)
  • Martha H. Mowry, MD: Pioneer in Medicine, Suffrage Movement. By Mary Korr. 103:1 (Feb 2020)
  • Quarantine & Infection Control: From the ‘Black Death’ to the 21st Century. By Mary Korr. 100:3 (Apr 2020)
    • Highlights of early quarantine practices
Rhode Island Hospital, from an early post card.

Other sources of information

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In 1834, numerous petitions were produced in the states urging the U.S. Congress to take certain positions regarding the Bank of the United States. Many such petitions were copied at some point into books of congressional business published in Washington DC.

In this manner, a petition from Providence, 1834 survives in which the signers, a group of “Mechanics and Artisans,” sought to back up their request by listing their occupations, thereby, one assumes, strengthening their case by demonstrating that their trades were suffering.

The individuals were “assembled from various towns in the State, at Providence, on Monday, March 24” [1834] so it should not be assumed that they were Providence residents. All appear to be men. Two facts which CAN be gleaned are:

  • in many cases, an occupation was given; this is likely their own designation
  • proximity of names in the list, like proximity in any such list, may mean something, or might not. But seeing two men with the same last name and similar occupations, next to each other or within a few names, suggest the possibility of family relationship. It’s a clue, but would have to be weighed against all other evidence.

There are perhaps 2200 names on this list of Rhode Island mechanics and artisans. To find a name of interest, it may be best to use a “Find on this page” utility in your web browser. The full text of the petition appears at the bottom of this post.

The Document

The 2200 names from the petition are listed below. Pages and columns refer not to the original document, which I have not seen, but to this pdf copy of the transcribed pages:

Source: Executive Documents, 23rd Congress, 1st Session, House of Representatives. Volume 5. Document No. 378. Full volume here.

This document was kindly sent to me by Rhode Island Roots editor Cherry Bamberg. You should check that pdf if you find a name of interest, to make sure I copied it correctly. Cherry found this document to be extremely interesting for the troublesome pre-1850 period, when we struggle to account for many details of our ancestors’ lives. In my case, I found some names on here I did not expect; a set of two people I thought arrived in Rhode Island 10 years later than this. I’m hoping you find something interesting too.

Note:

  • “do” means ditto, that is, the same occupation from the line above.
  • In a few cases, I added a different spelling of a name if I suspected that a Washington scribe, not familiar with Rhode Island names, transcribed it incorrectly; for these I left “mis-transcription?” notes.
  • In many cases, spellings varied; I left those as is, so be sure to search broadly.
  • Any notes about “illegible” were from the person transcribing into the printed book.
  • Some portions of the list do not mention occupations; it is unclear why.

The Petition

23d Congress, 1st Session [Doc. No. 378. ] Ho. of Reps.

RHODE ISLAND.

RESOLUTIONS AND MEMORIAL OF A CONVENTION OF MECHANICS AND ARTISANS,

In favor of the restoration of the deposites to, and the recharter of, the Bank of the United States.

MAY 5, 1834.

Read, and laid upon the table.

NAMES AND OCCUPATIONS.

Page 3, col 1

  • Jabez Gorham, jeweller
  • B. T. Yewinton, do
  • Ezra Hubbard, do
  • Henry L. Webster, silversmith
  • James H. Isaacson,  do
  • W. H. Quinby,  do
  • Joshua Godfrey, jeweller
  • Owen Salisbury, silversmith
  • Seth Yates, painter
  • Stephen Yates, painter
  • George Wheaton, watch maker
  • Henry Packard, tailor
  • Jonah Steere, saddler
  • Abner Benson, carpenter
  • Samuel E. Hamlin, pewterer
  • James M. Warner, 2d, do
  • William N. Amsburg [mis-transcription of Amsbury?], tailor
  • Jesse Amsbury,  do
  • Jeremiah Amable, cordwainer
  • James Mumford, jeweller
  • Louis Leveck,   do
  • Henry H. Giles,  do
  • James B.  Potter, do
  • Harvey Brown, do
  • Isaac H. Pinkney, do
  • William H. Fish, do
  • James M. White,  do
  • John Easton, cordwainer
  • John W. Lowden, jeweller
  • Major W. Shaw,  do
  • Ferdinand S. Eddy,  do
  • Robert Recit,  do
  • Nathaniel G. Holme, iron safe maker
  • Asa DodJe, blacksmith
  • George Cuzzine, millwright
  • S. W. Jorden, iron safe maker
  • Arnold Whipple, jeweller
  • William H. Standish, blacksmith
  • Alonzo Brown, iron founder
  • John Hallam, cutler
  • Josias L. Luther, blacksmith
  • Joseph E. Winsor, housewright

Page 3, col. 2

  • Alfred Potter, blue dyer
  • William Pierce, tanner
  • Corlis Barret, blue dyer           ·
  • Samuel Whelden, jun. mule spinner
  • Alexander Burgess, cotton spinner
  • David Taylor, cotton spinner
  • Alpheus Burges, picker maker
  • Silvanus Baker, cotton spinner
  • Benjamin Hathaway, shoemaker
  • Arnold Wilkinson, mechanic
  • John Gorham, picker maker
  • Gideon Palmer, Jun.  do
  • Alfred Adams,     do
  • Albert Holbrook,        do
  • L. D. Maynard, jeweller
  • George W. Eddy hatter
  • Edward P. Knowles, jeweller
  • Obadiah P. Osborn, housewright
  • Arthur Snow, tanner
  • Enos H. Briggs, founder
  • Lewis Cathean, weaver
  • Jabez Gorham, 2d, jeweller
  • Elisha Dillingham, cordwainer
  • Asa Scott, butcher
  • Benjamin Tuells, cooper
  • J. A. Wilkinson, civil engineer
  • William Bullas, file cutter
  • William Bullas, Jun., pearl engraver
  • William G. Angell, house carpenter
  • Nicholas N. Tuells, engraver
  • Edmund Sheffield, tanner
  • Thomas C. Hull, baker
  • Joseph Hammond, do
  • James H. Lindley, do
  • Rufus Burton, machinist
  • Dexter Angell, iron founder
  • William A. Hill, machinist
  • James A. Smith, blacksmith
  • Hiram Hatheway, machinist
  • Ebenezer Carey,  do
  • Ebenezer Wakefield,  do
  • Alfred M, Price, blacksmith

Page 4, col 1

  • Eleazer Holbrook, machinist
  • John Wakefield,  do
  • Henry C. Hill, pattern maker
  • Cornelius Mahony, carpenter
  • John Coggershall, machine maker
  • Ponley Batchelder, smelter of iron
  • Winsor Anyell [mis-transcription of Angell?],  carpenter
  • Edward Galloway, moulder
  • Jordan Taylor, do
  • Nelson Law,  do
  • Joseph Barber, machinist
  • David A. Cleaveland, turner of wood
  • Timothy J. Aldrich, furnace man
  • Joseph Yates, hatter
  • Albert Young, top roll coverer
  • Amasa Slocum, barber
  • Jesse Angell, machinist
  • Jeremiah Whipple, carpenter
  • Lewis 0. Brown, boat builder
  • Albert Ballou,  do
  • Eli Brown, silk dyer
  • Benjamin Newton, blacksmith
  • Alexander Hunter, goldsmith
  • John Cross, tailor
  • Asa Woolley, machinist
  • William Arnold, cooper
  • Isaac Angell, machinist
  • Ethan Whipple, miller
  • Samuel T. Manchester, machinist
  • Edmund Angell,  do
  • Elijah Alba, dyer
  • John McPhail, calico printer
  • Alpheus Fuller, shoemaker
  • James Gould, baker
  • John [illegible] painter
  • John H. Briggs machinist
  • Thomas R. Holden, tailor
  • Cyrus Fisher, mason
  • William C. Barker, tailor
  • Barzillai Cranston, printer
  • John S. Hammond,  do
  • William S. Aldrich, hatter
  • John Johnson, comb maker
  • Joseph Grant, hatter
  • Sylvanus Tingley, stone cutter
  • Willard Chace,  do
  • Gideon Davenport, carpenter
  • Thomas F. Potter, baker
  • Josiah Keene, coppersmith
  • Caleb Earle, housewright
  • Oliver Windall, bookbinder
  • Samuel Tingley, Jun., stone cutter
  • William B. Cranston,  do
  • Christopher Burr, engraver & jeweller
  • W. A. Handy, tailor
  • Samuel J. Bower, sign painter & gilder
  • Charles  P.  L.  Percival,  burnish gilder
  • Robt. Manchester, Jr., house carpenter
  • David Whipple, hat manufacturer

Page 4, col 2

  • Alonzo Draper, tailor
  • B. Thomas, do
  • George S. Tompkins, watch maker
  • Sam’l H. Wales, clock & watch maker.
  • William R. Frost, jeweller
  • Judson Blake, cabinet maker
  • William C. Force, cutler
  • Joseph Dorr, housewright
  • Gardner Vaughan, cordwainer
  • Caleb Allen, cabinet maker
  • Dexter Daniels, housewright
  • Josiah Whitaker, jeweller
  • George H. Bradford, housewright
  • Charles H. Harnor, hatter
  • Alfred Hicks, tailor
  • Ebn. N. Padelpin, tailor
  • Weston A. Fisher,  mason
  • Anthony Gardner. Jun., mason
  • Philip Luther,  do
  • Ebenezer C. Cook, cabinet maker
  • Leonard Blodget, mason
  • Daniel Hale,  do
  • John Calders, coppersmith
  • Thomas Phillips, plumber
  • Richard Salisbury, Jun., machinist
  • Henry D. Beckford, founder
  • George E. Cleaveland, cabinet maker
  • Allen Baker, carpenter
  • James R. Budlong,  do
  • Cornelius Fuller  do
  • Thomas Charnley, engraver
  • Sidney Smith, do
  • Joel Metcalf, Jun., tanner
  • Joseph G. Metcalf, currier
  • George Gurnett,  do
  • Lucius Warner,  do
  • Daniel B. Hawes, carpenter
  • Whiting Metcalf, goldsmith
  • Peter Church,  do
  • William Calder, jeweller
  • George Hunt,  do
  • Edwin S. Bradford,  do
  • Nathan B. Parks, housewright
  • William Collins, carpenter
  • Jesse Lumpson,  do
  • Stephen A. Bowen, cabinet maker
  • Stephen Olney, chaise maker
  • Cyrus Cleaveland, cabinet maker
  • Jesse Metcalf, tanner and currier
  • Pardon Brown, baker
  • William Barnes, shoemaker
  • Daniel Armington, engineer
  • George Livingston,  do
  • Thomas G. Stoddard, bleacher
  • George H. Bush, leather manufacturer
  • Philip B. Sherman, morocco dresser
  • Eliphalet Horton, mason
  • John B. Dexter, jeweller
  • Lewis Thayer, dyer

Page 5, col. 1

  • William P. Farnum, machinist
  • Welcome Angell, carpenter
  • William W. Chace, [stray mark here on transcription?] do
  • Joseph Fletcher, manufacturer
  • George A. Payne, carpenter
  • Simeon Barker, housewright
  • W. John Tilley, tailor
  • William Tilley cabinet maker
  • Alba D. Parker,  do
  • James Millerd,  do
  • Benjamin Hubbard, housewright
  • William C. Davenport,  do
  • Henry Miller,  do
  • Abial Tupp,  [mis-transcription of Tripp?] do
  • Philip H. Durfee,  do
  • Robert Tripp,  do
  • Darius E. Barker,  do
  • Oliver C. Nye, painter and glazier
  • Jam Hinckley, housewright
  • Sturgis P. Carpenter, do
  • Samuel D. Lindsey, tobacconist
  • George W. Bennet, painter and glazier
  • James Luther, do        do
  • George W. Harris, comb maker
  • James Wheaton, coppersmith
  • Edward Luther,  do
  • Edward Billings, painter and glazier
  • Thomas G. Nye, tanner
  • Isaac Thusbel, iron founder
  • William W. Burr,  do
  • Henry Knowles, tm plate worker
  • Henry Hopkins: machinist
  • John Aylesworth,  do
  • Barton Burlingame,  do
  • Nicholas R. Easton,  do
  • J. A. Arnold, 1st,  do
  • Daniel S. Olney,  do
  • Stephen Angell,  do
  • Greene Clapp, do
  • Bradford Briggs, furnace man
  • Albert Angell, pattern maker
  • Alba Peters, machinist
  • William A. Hopkins   do
  • Waldo Stone,  do
  • Calvin Richards, 2d  do
  • Ed. F. Richardson,  do
  • George Johnson, moulder
  • Peter Hall, iron melter
  • Chandler Hall,  do
  • William Stafford, moulder
  • Pardon Clarke, painter
  • Thomas Seekell, mason
  • Thomas Snow, segar maker
  • John M. James, barber
  • Olney Read, carriage maker
  • Isaac Kendall,  do
  • William A. Peirce,  do
  • Jacob Garland, saddler
  • S.  Gladding, barber
  • James Luther, Jun., mason

Page 5 col. 2

  • Thomas J. Gardner, tailor
  • David Jackins, [mis-transcription of Jenkins?] mason
  • William B. Mason,  do
  • Pardon Mason,  do
  • Simeon Arnold, housewright
  • Dexter Spencer, baker
  • Nicholas Peters, cordwainer
  • Jeremiah Hammond, tanner and currier
  • James W. Tibbitts, mason
  • William W. Butts, baker
  • Samuel Carpenter, mason
  • Isaac Field, tool maker
  • John Searle, carpenter
  • Philip Snow,  do
  • Elisha S. Evans, barber
  • Edward Burrows, housewright
  • Stephen Wardwell, baker
  • Benoni Lockwood, surveyor
  • Job Seekell, mason
  • Apollos Seekell, do
  • Allen Shaw, painter
  • Wm. Harris, mason
  • D. L. Winslow, cordwainer
  • Stephen Bosworth, housewright
  • Israel Pierce,  do
  • Ira Pierce,  do
  • David M. Hamilton, mason
  • James Allen, cordwainer
  • Benjamin Smith, housewright
  • Benjamin Eddy,
  • Arnold Irons, machanic
  • Bradford Hodges, painter
  • Briggs B. Gray,  do
  • John Miller, printer
  • Daniel Martin, merchant tailor
  • Augustus Wood, smith
  • Francis Bourn,  carpenter
  • Perley Hall, cabinet maker
  • Joshua Smith, tallow chandler
  • Elisha A. Chace, mason
  • Erastus S. Wilcox, do
  • Charles C. Lee, cabinet maker
  • William N. Douglass, do
  • Caleb C. Cook,  do
  • Nicholas Carr,  do
  • George E. Chedel, mason
  • George Andrews, cabinet maker
  • John Prentice, tailor
  • Daniel Tibbits,  do
  • Isaac N. Hallett, painter
  • Daniel C. Prentice, tailor
  • John T. Jackson, brass founder
  • Josiah F. Everett, baker          ·
  • Joseph Rawson, Jun.
  • Rhodes Allen, rope-maker
  • George B. Holmes, iron founder
  • C. S. Tompkins, machinist
  • James W. Holmes, iron founder
  • George Pierce, iron founder

Page 6, col. 1

  • Samuel Kilverts, iron founder
  • Augustus M. Wheeler, iron founder
  • Gideon Wilson, iron founder
  • Daniel Hull, iron founder
  • Leonard Carter, iron founder
  • Martin Kinsby, pattern maker
  • Edmund H. Perkins, iron founder
  • James Salsbury, shipwright
  • Willard Johnson, pattern maker
  • Robert Matteson, machinist
  • Samuel L. Spencer, machinist
  • John T. Walker, machinist
  • Lemuel Wyatt, machinist
  • Solomon D. Walker, blacksmith
  • H. M. Peck, pattern maker
  • Lemuel Sawyer, machinist
  • Otis Taber, machinist
  • George Horton, house carpenter
  • Joseph Cobb, iron founder
  • William Field, carpenter
  • Henry D’Erfield, painter
  • John A. Townsend, painter
  • Thomas G. Griffin, painter
  • John Durrwell, blockmaker
  • John Church, carpenter
  • Christian M. Westell, ornamental pt’r and gilder
  • William F. Greene, cordwainer
  • H. Stilwell, bookbinder
  • Isaac Wilcox, bookbinder
  • O. Kendall Jun., printer
  • Henry A. Howland, tin plate worker
  • James Brown, carpenter
  • Albert Snow, painter
  • Samuel Rawson, cabinet maker
  • George B. Rawson, cabinet maker
  • Edwin H. Lyman, cabinet maker
  • James Snow, tool maker
  • Esek Eddy,  
  • Samuel Proud, chair maker
  • John Taber, [transcription might say Tahor] Jun., cordwainer
  • Seth Spooner, baker
  • J. J. Gladding, tailor
  • Joseph S. Davis, jeweller
  • Thomas M. Hawkins, jeweller
  • Henry R. Warren, mechanic
  • William Hubbard, carpenter
  • John S. Allen, carpenter
  • Benjamin Tallman, carpenter
  • William Darnley, carpenter
  • Newman Thurber, engraver
  • Samuel Reynolds, nail maker
  • Edwin Fitch, machinist
  • Joseph Reynolds, machinist
  • Alexis Ladd, carpenter
  • S. Reynolds, machinist
  • James Martin, glazier
  • Joshua Brown, mason
  • Ephraim Harksom, brass founder

Page 6, col. 2

  • Thomas Boyd, tinner
  • James Brown, brass founder
  • Samuel Mason, hatter
  • Samuel Pearson, hatter
  • John F. Page, watchmaker
  • Russel Clapp, shoemaker
  • William Johnson, jeweller
  • Edward Billings, carpenter
  • William Tallman, carpenter
  • Russel Warren, carpenter
  • James C. Bucklin, carpenter
  • Norris Abbott, carpenter
  • Stary [mistranscription of Sterry?] Kelley, carpenter
  • Samuel Kelley, carpenter
  • E. Tallman, housewright
  • Esek Tallman, housewright
  • J. Congdon, house carpenter
  • Freeman Pease, carpenter
  • John G. Phillips, carpenter
  • John W. Field, carpenter
  • Stephen Brownell, carpenter
  • Franklin Maguire, carpenter
  • Henry Harden, carpenter
  • Samuel D. Allen, carpenter
  • Allen T. Manchester, carpenter
  • John D.  Jenckes, carpenter
  • John Clarke, carpenter
  • Samuel F. Randall, carpenter
  • William Warren, draughtsman
  • William H. Clark, painter
  • Watson D. Hatch, painter
  • Osborn S. Warren, carpenter
  • William P. Shaw, painter
  • Charles Robbins, tailor
  • Nathaniel F. Potter, mason
  • Jos. A. Andrews, mason
  • Joseph F. Gilmore, mason
  • Nicholas Whitford, stone cutter
  • John A. Darling, brush manufacturer
  • Waterman Irons, currier
  • Peleg Johnson, house carpenter
  • William Semer, cabinet maker
  • Nathaniel Fuller, glazier
  • William L.  Martin,  do
  • William T. Olney,  do
  • George W. Gilmore, blacksmith
  • Lewis Carr, jeweller
  • Calvin Dean, tanner and currier
  • Robert G. Corp, baker
  • Arnold Potter, segar maker
  • Wm. K. Thurber, organ manufactuer
  • Thomas Burse, segar maker
  • Henry Baker, mason
  • Gardner M. Burgess, house carpenter
  • Nathan Simmons,  do
  • Pasco Hanes, segar maker
  • Peleg Shearman, cordwainer
  • Joseph L. Denise, painter
  • John C. Cady, tobacconist

Page 7 col. 1

  • William Gonsolve, Jun. segar maker
  • John M. Fanning, segar maker
  • Theodore B. Talbot, jeweller
  • Jeremiah C.  Bliss, jeweller
  • Grenville Harden, jeweller
  • George Peck, stone cutter
  • Pardon P. JilIson, baker
  • Ezek. H. Jillson, house carpenter
  • David Winch, housewright
  • William A. Potter, mason
  • Douglas F. Seamans, house carpenter
  • Alvan S. Arnold, house carpenter
  • Joseph R. Budlong, house carpenter
  • David Briggs, house carpenter
  • David Orswell, wheelwright
  • Henry Hedly, 2d, wheelwright
  • Benjamin Orswell, wheelwright
  • James S. Burgess, house carpenter
  • Gardner Chilson, carver
  • Christopher E. Potter, mason
  • Dennis P. Hunt, mason
  • James A. Potter, mason
  • William T. Brownell, house carpenter
  • Clark Oundell, [mis-transcription of Crandall?] mason
  • John Peckham, shoemaker
  • Thaddeus Curtis, brush maker
  • Alden Pabodie, tailor
  • William Harding, house carpenter
  • William Trescott, hatter
  • Samuel G. Butts, tailor
  • John P. Hunt, mason
  • George Hill, soap and candle manuf’r.
  • E. Potter, mason
  • Stephen Trowbridge, hatter
  • John Baggs, cooper
  • Stephen D. Olney, painter and glazier
  • William Taylor, tailor
  • Edward S. Folger, confectioner
  • William L. Worinton, mason
  • William Slardenburgh, mason
  • Amos Jillson, cooper
  • William Derby, chairmaker
  • Leonard Whitney, cooper
  • Edwin G.  Metcalf, painter
  • Aaron Wood, chair seater
  • Harvey M. Cole, blacksmith
  • Welcome Matteson, stone cutter
  • George B. Corp, harness-maker
  • Stepljen B. Jenks, confectioner
  • Alexander D. Folger, confectioner
  • Clement Folger, cooper
  • Francis Anderson, Jun., rope maker
  • William 0. Jillson, baker
  • William W. Crandell, brass founder
  • William H. Gale, housewright
  • John Sherman, tailor
  • George Davis, jeweller
  • James Eames, tin plate worker
  • John Andrew, do        do

Page 7, col. 2

  • Anson Lewis, tin plate worker
  • Elijah Pomeroy,  do   do
  • John Collum,  do  do
  • William T. Sargent,  do  do
  • Joshua K. lngalls,  do   do
  • Charles H.  Allen,  do   do
  • Samuel  A. Briggs,  do  do
  • Isaac Cooke,   do  do
  • Rowland Duckworth, Jun. do
  • James H. Eames,  do  do
  • [Illegible]
  • C. Barstow,  house carpenter
  • Samuel Stone, chaise and harness mak.
  • Thomas Fenner, Jun.  do do
  • Edward Stone,   do   do
  • Albert Pollard,  do do
  • Frederick A. Parks,  do do
  • Ebenezer Johnson, tin-plate worker & gunsmith
  • Nathan Irvine, lamp maker
  • Seth B. Cook, Jun. lamp maker
  • James E. Budlong, jeweller
  • Otis H. Cushing, blacksmith
  • John Irvine, mason
  • Edward Eddy, painter
  • Thomas M. Parker, chair maker and painter
  • Francis Salmon, painter
  • John Hazard, house carpenter
  • Reuben Brown, house carpenter
  • Anthony P. Shaw, tin plate worker
  • G. I. Nottage, tin plate and sheet iron worker
  • Samuel S. Robinson, house carpenter
  • William Newton, blacksmith
  • J. B. Nichols, jeweller
  • Henry L. Kendall, tallow chandler
  • Emmons Partridge, blacksmith
  • Henry D. Davis,  do
  • Smith Potter, wheelwright
  • Ira L. Beckwell, chaise maker
  • E. W. F.  Rice, painter
  • Gardner Z. Swart, baker
  • Charles Davis, blacksmith
  • Samuel Smith Partridge,  do
  • Albert Corliss,  do
  • William H. Ireland, painter
  • Nathaniel Lang, harness maker
  • Freedom Nason,  do
  • John Clemmons, tailor
  • Ferdinand Barber, painter
  • Charles T. Martin,  do
  • William H. Murray, turner
  • Stephen Horton, bricklayer
  • Nicholas Stillwell, tin plate worker
  • John Babcock, machinist
  • Robert L. Thurston,  do
  • William Howard,  do
  • Otis B. Salisbury  do

Page 8, col. 1

  • Fenner Salisbury, machinist
  • Richard  Baker,  do
  • Calvin  W.  Richards,  do
  • John A. Hopkins,  do
  • Addison M. Fairbanks,  do
  • John P. Jones, tinner
  • James Wheaton, machinist
  • Simeon Briggs, carpenter
  • Nicholas D. Greene, tailor
  • James Sweet, cordwainer
  • Charles Greene,  do
  • Jeffery Davis, carder
  • John Chappell, stone mason
  • William T. Wood, spinner
  • Nathan B. Wright, carpenter
  • George F. Goodwin, cabinet maker and upholsterer
  • Jeremiah S. Short, cabinet maker
  • George Atwood,  do
  • James T. Monroe, carpenter
  • Jesse Bicknell, Jun.   do
  • Samuel Peckham, mason
  • Osnant S. Fuller, carpenter
  • Alfred C. Sheldon, do
  • George W. Lovett, tailor
  • William H. Card,  do
  • John M. Austin,  do
  • Benjamin Paine,  do
  • William James Holder, tin plate worker
  • Frederick Lathrop,  do
  • Arthur Adlington, Jun.   do
  • Freeman Nickerson, blacksmith
  • Adams Thompson,  do
  • George Wilkins, harness maker
  • Albert Eaton, chaise painter
  • Daniel P. Fisk, painter
  • Robt. Aldrich, operator of water looms
  • Nelson Jencks, machinist
  • Hiram Paine
  • George Farnum, machinist
  • Aaron H. Cook, mason
  • Amos C. Burrill
  • George Jenckes
  • Christopher G. Staffor, carpenter
  • Jesse Ennis
  • James M. Warner, jeweller
  • Henry Cushing, paper stainer
  • George Baker, jeweller
  • Caleb Arnold, bootmaker
  • Hiram Hill,  carpenter
  • Jacob Silloway,  do
  • Ephraim Martin,  do
  • Ebenezer Carpenter,  do
  • W. Belcher, tin plate & sheet iron w’ker
  • Alphonso R. Janes,  do
  • John Robertson, tin plate worker
  • Anthonr Wehosky, blacksmith
  • Henry D. Martin, glazier
  • William B. Dean, house carpenter

Page 8, col. 2

  • Charles W. Rhodes, carpenter
  • Horace Battey,  do
  • Daniel E. Carpenter,  do
  • Jonathan Drown,  do
  • Samuel M. Taber, gold and silversmith
  • William E. Taber,  do
  • George 0. Bowen, bootmaker
  • George Grafton, 2d, carpenter
  • Edward W. Billings, barber
  • Nathan O. Gilmore, mason
  • Joseph W. Davis, book binder
  • Ray Clapp, carpenter
  • Aaron B. Curry, chair painter
  • Nelson Pearce,  mason
  • George T. Wheler,  do
  • John W.  Horton,  do
  • Jonas R. Gale, plane maker
  • Isaac S. Battey,  do
  • Luther Peirce, carpenter
  • William Billings, do
  • Albert T. Evans
  • John W. Arnold, carpenter
  • Josiah H. Martin,  do
  • George Beverly,  do
  • Joseph C. Fanning,  do
  • Elias Barston, shipwright
  • William B. Wilson, carpenter
  • John F. Moore tailor
  • Samuel S. Lathrop, carpenter
  • Joseph  Battey,  do
  • Joseph Martin, goldsmith
  • Arthur M. Potter, Jun., jeweller
  • Jonathan R. Swan, carpenter
  • Samuel Boyd, baker
  • Josiah S. Wardwell, house carpenter
  • John C. Jenckes, jeweller
  • William T. Wardwell, cabinet maker
  • Oliver K. Wilbur, house carpenter
  • Alpheus Fenner,  do
  • Joseph Fuller, blockmaker
  • Wm. P.R. Benson, house carpenter
  • Jacob Manchester, housewright
  • John G. Pettit  do
  • Albert Messinger, carpenter
  • Samuel Munro, cooper
  • George E. Blake, house carpenter
  • William  Weston,  do
  • Russel Arnold,  do
  • Alfred Sprink, carpenter
  • Charles W. Randall, house carpenter
  • Willard W. Fairbanks, boiler maker
  • Asa Pike, housewrigbt
  • Stephen Burr, cabinet maker
  • George Green, cooper
  • Luther Lyon, housewright
  • Laban Eastenbrooke [perhaps mis-transcription of Easterbrooke],  do
  • James Perry Brett, ropemaker
  • William Woodward, ropemaker
  • Samuel A. Thomas, house carpenter

Page 9, col. 1

  • Henry Potter, housewright
  • Joseph C. Shaw, blacksmith
  • William Woodward, Jun., ropemaker
  • William Budlong, house carpenter
  • Samuel Warren,  do
  • Jonathan Pike, housewright
  • Abraham B. Salsbury  do
  • George W. Mason
  • Daniel Hale, millwright
  • Bradbury C. Hill, blacksmith
  • John Vannevar, bricklayer
  • Benjamin Gage, painter
  • Samuel Havens, carpenter
  • Peleg Fiske, machinist
  • Daniel Carpenter, machinist
  • Ezra Blake, carpenter
  • Job Luther, millwright
  • Daniel Follet, carpenter
  • Cyrus B. Hutchinson, blacksmith
  • Dexter Carpenter, machinist
  • Allen Haskell,  do
  • Israel Tucker,  do
  • Benjamin M. Darling,  do
  • Stafford N. Congdon,  do
  • Joseph K. Whipple,  do
  • Lyman Burlingame, carpenter
  • Alexander Barney, shoemaker
  • Charles Bullar, tailor
  • Carleton Cushman, wheelwright
  • Thomas Jeffer, shoemaker
  • George Boss, machinist
  • John Tripp, ropemaker
  • Nathaniel Phillips, stone cutter
  • Samuel Sprague, mason
  • Nathan Young, carder
  • William Douglass, spinner
  • John Drape, mule spinner
  • Stillman Rand,  do 
  • Wm. Bamford,  do
  • Caleb R. Bryant, weaver
  • John B. Vars,  mule spinner
  • William Shortriggs,  do
  • Samuel Francis, dresser tender
  • John   M’Andervey,  do
  • William W. Bube,  do 
  • Matthew Campbell,  do
  • William M. Ward, clothier
  • William J. Phillips,  weaver
  • Isaac Hessenden, woolstapler
  • Robert Stephenson,  do
  • John R. Kerby, weaver
  • Joseph Kiner, wool dyer
  • John Payton, weaver
  • Thomas Gilmour, clockmaker
  • Dexter A. Edwards, dyer
  • Newel Lee, weaver
  • D.  Christie, warper
  • Zebina Thwing, broadcloth shearer and presser

Page 9, col. 2

  • Caleb V. Waterman, wheelwright
  • S. E. Sweet, carpenter
  • Hazael H. Cary, wool spinner
  • H. Ballard, fuller of cloth
  • Consider W. Burt, carder
  • Edwin M. Sears,  do
  • James Payton, cordwainer
  • C. C. Raine, woolstapler
  • Solomon Brown, woollen dyer
  • Lafayette Pierce, carpenter
  • John Wait, wood and iron worker
  • Jonathan Aldrich, cordwainer
  • E. Sweet, carpenter
  • David G. Fales, machinist
  • Alvin Jenks,  do
  • Samuel S. Arnold,  do
  • Daniel Tisdale, carpenter
  • Ebenezer Northup, machinist
  • George A. Bacon,  do
  • L. P. Shepardson,  do
  • Jubal Patt, carpenter
  • William Patt,  do
  • Jerem.  W.  Patt,  do
  • Albert Rogers, mule spinner
  • Ansel Baxter,  do
  • Hiram Smith, overseer
  • Moses Smith,  do
  • Peleg F. Wait, machinist
  • Luther Buffinton, cordwainer
  • Jonathan Brown, wheelwright
  • Ebenezer Ide, carpenter
  • Nathan Crowell,  do
  • Nicholas A. Fenner,  do
  • Weaver Carr,  do
  • Wm.  P. Young, carder
  • Horace P. Young, superintendent
  • John Boodry, carder
  • Benjamin Rogers, mule spinner
  • Robert Jordan,  do
  • Samuel C. Collyer, superintendent
  • Thomas J. Benedict, carder
  • John T. Fales, carpenter
  • George Smith, machinist
  • William West, cordwainer
  • John Dickerson, miller
  • Sabin Allen, blacksmith
  • David Martin, turner
  • Samuel V. Medbery, housewright
  • Larned Scott, mechanic
  • Adam Passey
  • Orrin Packard
  • Wilder Whipple
  • Robert Whipple
  • Ethan Lawrence
  • William C. Burdick
  • Thomas Grayson
  • James Madson
  • [Pliny?] Ray
  • David Lawrence

Page 10, col. 1

  • Alonzo A. Wiley
  • James M. Patt
  • Simon Winsor
  • George H. Capron
  • John A. Polsey
  • John Dee
  • Joseph T. Hoxeil [mis-transcription of Hoxie?]
  • Pliny Bosworth
  • William Perry
  • Isaac R. Scott
  • George G. Ray_
  • Benjamin T. Marbee
  • Baytan [mis-transcription of Brayton?] Slater
  • Augustus Millerd
  • Sidon Adams
  • Arnold C. Hawes
  • Amos B. Hawes
  • Wm. H. Rhodes
  • Samuel W. Wiley
  • Olney Burlingame
  • Peleg H. Kent
  • John Brown
  • Job M. Knight
  • Thomas J. Arnold
  • Israel Arnold, Jun.
  • Edwin Smith
  • Jabez Hill
  • John Waterman
  • Elhanan Tucker
  • Haskins
  • George Butes
  • William Bartlett
  • James Langley
  • Wm. H. Brown
  • James D. Walcott
  • Samuel Young
  • Uriah Godfrey
  • Henry P. Greene
  • Lloyd B. Brayton, 2d
  • Eber Miller
  • James M. Patt
  • Stephen Dexter, mechanic
  • James Tyng,  do
  • Levi Smith,  do
  • Hiram Bowen,  do
  • George Kelly,  do
  • Jeremiah Patt, do
  • Seth Vose,  do
  • Dixson Morris, artisan
  • Witham Jones,   do
  • Bonaparte Bates,  do
  • Thomas Williams,  do
  • W. H. Brown, 2d  do
  • Horatio  H. Perry,  do
  • Nathan Robbins, do
  • John Barna,  do
  • Samuel Chace
  • Albert Barker
  • Jeremiah Pierce

Page 10, col. 2

  • David W. Gardner
  • H. Holden
  • Stephen Peck
  • Nathaniel W. Quint
  • William Alexander
  • Joseph C. Whipple
  • Shubael Jillson
  • Jesse Whiting. blacksmith
  • Jared Parker, housewright
  • Henry Williams, tailor
  • Warren Miller,   do
  • Ellis Everett,  do
  • George W. Trafford,  do
  • William Lindsey,  do
  • Arnold Reynolds, cordwainer
  • Grant, machinist
  • Stephen W. Sayles,  do
  • Lyman Cooke,  do
  • Ames Grant,  do
  • Alexander Kennedy,  do
  • Daniel Daggett,  do
  • Arnold Cook,  do
  • David D. Kent,  do
  • Zadock Botterson, carpenter
  • Oliver Pain,  do
  • Benjamin B. Slade, machinist
  • Augustus B. Copeland,  do
  • Whipple Metcalf,  do
  • William Metcalf,  do
  • Israel Greene, tobacconist
  • Sabin P. Pond, painter
  • Hollis Allen, machinist
  • Spencer Mowry, housewright
  • Benjamin Green, painter
  • William N. Moone, machinist
  • Albert C. Vose,            do
  • William Vose,  do
  • Willis Cook,  do
  • Ellis Day, blacksmitb
  • Waterman Thornton,  do
  • Joseph Gould,  do
  • Nelson Ballou, machinist
  • Edmund Bacon, iron founder
  • Lynum [mis-trascription of Lyman?] A. Cook, machinist
  • Osmon Hathaway,  do
  • Daniel M. Paine,  do
  • Dexter Hathaway,  do
  • Luther Brist
  • Marble Dow,  do
  • George W. Horton, iron founder
  • Charles F. F. Stebbins,  do
  • Charles R Jordan,  do
  • William Clifford,  do
  • Richard Strange,  do
  • William Hathaway,  do
  • Derreck P. Brown, machinist
  • Andrew Kelly, iron founder
  • Alanson Kelly,  do
  • Marvin W. Fisher, machinist

Page 11, col. 1

  • Benjamin [illegible] carder
  • Lebbens C. Tourtellot, machinist
  • Stephen P. Fisk, housewright
  • George A. Gillmor, machinist
  • George S. Stirrep,  do
  • James M. Thorp, millwright
  • Ichabod Allen, housewright
  • Otis M. [illegible] bobbin turner
  • Elisha Sherman, machinist
  • Michael McCouen, weaver
  • Samuel Snee, carpenter
  • Jesse Calder, baker
  • John Brown,  do
  • Luke Thayer, cordwainer
  • Olney Mason
  • Stephen A. Aldrick [mis-transcription of Aldrich?], carpenter
  • Charles Fish, chair maker
  • Silas Whalford, house carpenter
  • Stephen Hutchinson,
  • Charles D. Edmonds, cordwainer
  • Hiram Thayer,  do
  • Alanson Smith, varnish maker
  • Leavit C. Cole, blacksmith
  • Wm. Whitman, Jun., wagon maker
  • Joseph Manchester, furnace man
  • Stephen G. Williams, mason
  • Daniel Ward, plough maker
  • Amos Fuller, house carpenter
  • Parmer Harrinton, blacksmith
  • Abram Chase,  do
  • Hiram Walker, furnace man
  • B. B. Wood, furnace man
  • Levi Parker, chair painter
  • Israel Bennett, furnace man
  • Patrick Huse,  do
  • Isaac Chase,  do
  • Andrew Johnson, tinman
  • Moses G. Cady,  do
  • Seth Walker, furnace man
  • Abraham  H.  Padelford,  do
  • Hugh McCaffoy,  do
  • L. Spalding, picker maker
  • John C. Sweet, dresser tender
  • Daniel Wheelock, master carder
  • Samuel D. Pierce, master weaver
  • William Tanner, machinist
  • John B. Arnold, tailor
  • George W. Whitman, salesman
  • William Clapp, accountant
  • Samuel S. Allen, carpenter
  • John Greene, blacksmith
  • Abel Tanner, mule spinner
  • Jeremiah Tanner,  do
  • James Curtis,  do
  • Oliver Wilbour  do
  • Stephen Arnold, teamster
  • Sam. A. Tillinghast, teacher of youth
  • C. Olney Arnold, cabinet maker
  • C. W. Spalding, operative manufac’ter

Page 11, col. 2

  • Sylvester K. Merrill, machinist
  • Paul Wheelock, carder
  • Daniel Curtis, master weaver
  • Samuel Curtis, miller
  • Nelson B. Tanner, mule spinner
  • Daniel Tanner, master carder
  • Josiah Merrill, spinner
  • Joseph E. Lock, carder
  • Henry N. Greene,  do
  • William G. Wood,  mule spinner
  • James Woodmaney [mis-transcription of Woodmancy (Woodmansee)?],  do
  • David Greene  do
  • Joshua A. Johnson, sawyer
  • Israel Wood, shoemaker
  • Nicholas E. Gardiner, butcher
  • Sterry B. Fenner, carpenter
  • Walter Lawrence, mason
  • Henry Hamilton, carpenter
  • William H. Dyer,  do
  • Benoni Harris, machinist
  • F. Briggs,  do
  • Darius T. Johnson,  do
  • Malachi Standish, blacksmith
  • James S. Davis,  do
  • Joseph Colwell, wheelwright
  • Nelson Briggs, do
  • William Winsor, Jun., carpenter
  • Anson Tifft, wheelwright
  • Benoni Knight, blacksmith
  • Charles James Westcott, sailor
  • Olney Winsor, machinist
  • Horace Prior, clothier
  • Albert Fuller, blacksmith
  • Daniel Anthony, cotton spinner
  • Smith Williams, weaver
  • Charles Hunt, spinner
  • Lyman Dawley, do
  • Thos. S. Watson, do
  • Alfred Austin, dresser tender
  • Francis W. Gardiner, spinner
  • Wm. G. Shelden, dresser tender
  • Barton Tanner, spinner
  • Benjamin F. Knowles, weaver
  • Halsey Greene, dresser
  • Job Harkness, machinist
  • Joseph Watson, spinner
  • Jonathan Cord, dresser
  • Lawton Johnson, spinner
  • Joseph B. Rice, carder
  • William J. Greene, spinner
  • Robert K. Lewis, weaver
  • John Austin, carder
  • Gideon C. Briggs, spinner
  • Edward C. Briggs,  do
  • Elisha Whitman, housewright
  • Martin Bradford,  do
  • Wm. B. Babcock,  dresser tender
  • Charles Harkness, machinist
  • John Wood, spinner

Page 12, col. 1

  • George J. Vaughn, carder
  • Samuel A. [illegible] machinist
  • Nathaniel Arnold, Sen., do
  • John Tew, blacksmith
  • Varnum W. Gannon, cotton picker
  • Elias Card, basket maker
  • Amos Moore, miller
  • Stephen Manchester, carder
  • John Place, carpenter
  • Abel Matteson, cordwainer
  • Job Albro, carpenter
  • Marcus Cornell, blacksmith
  • Enos Lapham, house carpenter
  • Earl Whiting, machinist
  • Stephen S. Waterman, machinist
  • George S. Knutton, machinist
  • Burrill Brown, machinist
  • Nathan Westcott, machinist
  • Henry Phetteplace, machinist
  • Thomas J. Mowry, machinist
  • Caleb Westcott, machinist
  • Leander Sweet, machinist
  • Henry Jenckes, machinist
  • George Boomer, artisan
  • Thomas W. Eddy, machinist
  • George D. Cole, artisan
  • Arnold Briggs,  do
  • Philip F. Brayton, machinist
  • Preserved Sherman, machinist]
  • William Pooke, machinist
  • Reuben Salsbury, machinist
  • Dean Potter, machinist
  • James B. Coman, machinist
  • Elijah Dory, Jun. machinist
  • Ira Field, Jun. machinist
  • Hiram Hopkins, operator
  • William Brayton, machinist
  • Peleg Hopkins, machinist
  • John Hawkins, machinist
  • Jenckes  A.  Smith
  • Appleby Smith
  • Rhodes Hill, house carpenter
  • Jacob Briggs
  • Benoni Hopkins, blacksmith
  • William Swan, machinist
  • Stephen Austin, machinist
  • Elijah Day, house carpenter
  • Noah J. Arnold, overseer of power looms
  • Aaron Bowen, overseer of carding
  • Benoni Rogers, dresser tender
  • Robert R. Sunderlin, mule spinner
  • Daniel G. Chace, overseer of power-looms
  • Jacob Wood, Jun. mulespinner
  • Benjamin Greene, farmer
  • Abner Rogers, farmer
  • Paul Harrington, overseer of carding and spinning

Page 12, col. 2

  • G. B. Card, shuttle-maker and house painter
  • Job Card, machinist and shuttle-maker
  • Levi Johnson, mule-spinner
  • William Chace, dresser tender
  • Samuel Briggs, teacher of public school
  • John Willbur, blacksmith
  • Lowry Potter, blacksmith
  • Benjamin S. Briggs, blacksmith
  • Merit Andrews, overseer of carding and spinning
  • John P. Miller, cordwainer
  • Sterry Parker, cordwainer
  • Wills Reynolds, farmer and manufacturer
  • Luther Waldren, dresser tender
  • Samuel Bissel, overseer of carding
  • Timothy Carpenter, Jun. overseer of power-looms
  • Oliver Matteson, overseer of carding
  • Alban M. Stone overseer of looms, dresser tender, farmer, and merchant
  • Jeremiah B. Austin, tailor
  • Jesse Cooke, finisher and packer of goods
  • Owen Spencer, stone cutter
  • Anthony Tarbox, cashier and watch-maker
  • Charles Morse, Jun. bricklayer and plasterer
  • Russel Chace, house carpenter
  • Charles Morse, Jun. farmer and merchant
  • Benjamin Bently, overseer of power looms
  • Jonathan Franklin, miller
  • Thomas Goshen, farmer
  • Ira Baily, cordwainer
  • Giles S. Jenkins, bricklayer and plasterer
  • Isaac Hyde, overseer of spinning
  • Sheffield Andrew, mule spinner
  • Joseph G. Clark, mule spinner
  • Silas Wells, Jun.  machinist
  • James M. Harrington, machinist
  • Jason Strait, dresser tender
  • William Matteson, picker-tender
  • John J. Kilton, carpenter
  • Joseph Jash
  • Asaph Bowen, farmer
  • Joseph Card, overseer of power looms
  • James Case, mule spinner
  • Martin S. Whitman, housewright
  • George T. Spicer, machinist
  • Thomas Covil, weaver
  • Scott W. Mowry, operative mechanic
  • Thomas Nutting, dressser of yarn
  • Thomas A. Oakley, miller
  • Amos Budlong, machinist

Page 13, col. 1

  • John Firth, carder
  • John Nutting, Jr. spinner
  • Isaac B. Howland, dresser
  • Thomas Covil, 2d. dresser
  • Charles W. Crary, weaver
  • Thomas D. Bentley, weaver
  • James Tanner, mule spinner
  • George W. Dyer, blacksmith
  • Wm. Clarke, clerk
  • Joseph Nutting, spinner
  • Joseph S. Budlong, yeoman
  • Alfred Jerauld, spinner
  • Albert D. Greene, weaver
  • Alden Arnold, weaver
  • Charles Slade, dresser tender
  • Albert G. Alexander, mule spinner
  • Anson Barnes, spinner
  • Henry Littlefield, spinner
  • Wm. Blanniher, trader
  • Ira Basto carder
  • Harmon C. Fisher, saddler
  • Jahleel Westcott, cordwainer
  • Josiah Weshott [mis-transcription of Wescott?], trader
  • John S. Taylor, painter
  • Thomas Taylor, chair maker
  • Daniel G. Bates, mule spinner
  • Alfred Read, machinist
  • Henry S. Wilbur, carpenter
  • John W. Tibbitts, physician
  • Arabert A. Wescott, weaver
  • Chester Wakefield, manufacturer
  • Rufus Grant, cordwainer
  • Stephen Sweet, carpenter
  • Philip Arnold, trader
  • Joseph Webb, mule spinner
  • William Randall, mule spinner
  • Levi Stafford, cloth dresser
  • Gorton Arnold, farmer
  • Ephraim Covil,  do
  • Samuel Moor,  do
  • Jeremiah Wilber,  do
  • Benjamin King,  do
  • Dutee Arnold,  do
  • Joseph Hoann, Jr  do
  • John Stone, spinner
  • Allen Hill, laborer
  • James Yeaw, farmer
  • Wm C. Ames, accountant
  • Robert Emerson, oper. Of power looms
  • W. Bailey, painter and glazier
  • George Babcock, laborer
  • Lawton Greene, do
  • Joseph Hart,  do
  • William Atwood, mule spinner
  • Raymond Rathbone, do
  • Charles A Sweet, operator of spinning and weaving
  • Caleb Bennett, operator of carding
  • Rob’t W. Potter, practical manufact’r

Page 13, col. 2

  • Alex. M’Murray, operator of power-looms
  • Olney Briggs, laborer
  • Raymond Stone, machinist
  • Norris H. Church, laborer at a manufacturing establishment
  • John B. Whitehead,  do  do
  • George W. Whitehead,  do  do
  • Spencer B. Mowry,  do  do
  • Oliver Clark,  do  do
  • John Day, carpenter and machinist
  • Joseph W. Thornton, carpenter
  • William O. Gardner, blacksmith
  • E. H. Newbegin, comb maker
  • Jabez N. Horton,  do
  • Edwin Vernon  do
  • William Joyce  do
  • Harmanus Karseboom, do
  • Thomas T. Beers   do
  • James B. Beverly  do
  • George Hull  do
  • Samuel W. Wade, artisan
  • Albin C. King,  do
  • Orrin Cahoon,  do
  • Giles Pierce,  do
  • Gardner Cahoon,  do
  • James Webster,  do
  • Laban Bennet,  do
  • Mutin M. Bailey,  do
  • Billings C. Kaighn,  do
  • David Yeaw,  do
  • Caleb Mowry,  do
  • Samuel Hoyt, comb maker
  • Richard Bishop,  do
  • Asahel Stone,  do
  • Wm. L. Brown,  do
  • Peleg Kaighn,  do
  • James Lock,  do
  • Alfred Parker, carpenter
  • James Westlute, blacksmith
  • Jonathan S. Killey, machinist
  • Charles King,  do
  • Peter J. Briggs,  do
  • W. N. Sherman, printer
  • Silas W. Wilder,  do
  • Leprelt Fuller, carpenter
  • Aaron Rathbun, mason
  • Eli Pongt, Jun., painter and glazier
  • John Burnham,  do
  • Philip B. Stiness, cloth dresser
  • Abijah B. Warfield, painter
  • Isaac C. Stetson, cotton worker
  • Lewis R. Blake, weaver
  • Rouse A. Northup
  • Arnold Chappells
  • Johnson B. Colerain
  • Zephaniah Sherman, carpenter-
  • Hervey  Arnold,  do
  • George Parker, machinist

Page 14, col. 1

  • William W. Spencer, machinist
  • George W. Davis, weaver
  • George Collins, mule spinner
  • Allen Briggs, machinist
  • Pardon Newell,  do
  • Benjamin Snell, mule spinner
  • John Franklin, do
  • George W. Slade, spinner
  • Oliver Taylor, carder
  • George M. Collins, mule spinner
  • William Chappell, carpenter
  • Elias Fisher, dresser tender
  • Abner C. Manchester, carder
  • Robert Douglass, shoemaker
  • Henry W. Hoyle, machinist
  • Richard Sweet, carpenter
  • Job Manchester
  • Willet Young
  • John Weaver
  • George G. Warner
  • Samuel W. Wightman
  • Robert H. Niles
  • John Carr
  • Samuel J. Sherman
  • Christopher W. Sprague
  • Thomas Stafford
  • Richard W. Rhodes
  • Andrew B. Burlingame
  • Thomas Greene
  • Thomas R. Greene
  • Joseph Burrows
  • Allen E. Aylsworth
  • Gilbert Blanchard
  • Hosea Bicknell
  • Joseph Brady
  • E. P. Ellis
  • Peleg P. Cranston
  • William Spencer
  • Abel Slocum
  • Taber Hollis
  • Samuel Slocum
  • James Fisher
  • Welcome Bates
  • William U. Arnold
  • Joseph P. Cogshall
  • Joseph Cogshall
  • J. B. Cook
  • Remington Arnold
  • Jabez Holden
  • Benjamin M. Bourne
  • Wilkes Gardiner
  • Samuel Reynolds
  • David Wilbur
  • James W. Brayton
  • Christopher Briggs
  • Edward Grierman
  • Elisha Andrews
  • William Remington
  • Robert Thompson

Page 14 col. 2

  • Caleb L. Ormsbee
  • Thomas W. Greene
  • Joseph Budlong
  • Henry J. Wightman
  • (Name illegible.]
  • Sion A. Rhodes
  • Hales G. Ellis
  • Thomas Cleveland
  • Perez Peck, machinist
  • Isaac B. Aylsworth,  do
  • Albert Anthony,  do
  • M01es Haskell, Jun.  do
  • Joseph Sisson,   do
  • Job Russell,  do
  • Cyril C. Bowen,  do
  • Warren Wearer [mis-transcription of Weaver?],  do
  • Charles Rouse,  do
  • George Rouse,  do
  • James C. Millerd,  do
  • Benjamin Farries, do
  • Daniel Williams,  do
  • Harry Howard,  do
  • Edwin Johnson,  do
  • Aldin W. Williams,  do
  • Nathan Howard,  do
  • Daniel Greene,   do
  • George Aylesworth, blue dyer
  • Samuel G. Brayman, tailor
  • H. G. Dunham, harness maker
  • Isaac W. Clark,   do
  • Raymond Smith, carriage maker
  • Albert Smith, carriage maker
  • John R. Allen,  do
  • Ashbel Wall, millwright
  • Nathaniel Arnold, machinist
  • James Matteson, carpenter
  • George W. Bennet,  do
  • Ezekiel Morse,  do
  • Henry R. Remington, calenderer
  • Joseph Harvey,  do
  • William Henry Anthony, weaver
  • Jabez Anthony, carder
  • Charles Anthony, spinner
  • Josiah W. Battey machinist
  • Cyril Babcock, machinist
  • Robert Levally, carpenter
  • Galusha W. Arnold, carpenter
  • B. Sherman, carpenter
  • James F. Hills, machinist
  • Ezra Bissell  do
  • Daniel Town,  do
  • Horatio S. Berry,  do
  • Palmer J. Johnson,  do
  • John Brower, carpenter
  • Zephaniah Ramsdel, carpenter
  • George Levalley, machinist
  • James Warner, Jr.  do
  • Harris Lanphear,  do
  • Henry R. Gorton,  do

Page 15 col. 1

  • Nathaniel Millerd machinist
  • Ray Matteson  do
  • Schuyler Skinner,  do
  • Sheldon Colvin, blacksmith
  • Francis B. Atwood, bobbin turner
  • Thomas Arnold, machinist
  • Wm. D. E. Avery,  do
  • Thomas P. Lanphear,  do
  • Ray W. Atwood, shoemaker
  • Caleb Kilton, mason
  • Wm. M. Cooke, bleacher
  • G. J. Adams., machinist
  • Robert R. Knowles, tailor
  • Isaac Congdon, cotton manufacturer
  • Christopher Cory, laborer
  • Nathaniel Langley, weaver
  • Joseph Billington, farmer
  • Caleb R. Cahoon, carpenter
  • Reynolds Andrew, laborer
  • Samuel Gavit, laborer
  • John L. Clark, machinist
  • Rodmond Congdon, bleacher
  • Wm. Bowen, tanner
  • Nathaniel Chase, carpenter
  • Christopher Nicholas, carpenter
  • Arvin Potter, dresser tender
  • Daniel Knight, carpenter
  • Almon C. Whitman, carpenter
  • John A. Budlong, blacksmith
  • Obadiah Colvin, bleacher
  • H. G. Davis, shoe manufacturer
  • Richard Chappell, shoemaker
  • Stephen S. Potter, machinist
  • James Parkerson, tailor
  • James C. Greene, cordwainer
  • John G. Ladd, carpenter
  • Thomas Le Braton, tailor
  • John J. Simmons, tailor
  • Richard Spencer, cordwainer
  • Thomas L. Spencer, cordwainer
  • Nathan M. Spencer,  do
  • Freeborn Johnson, Jun. carpenter
  • Martin Miller, cordwainer
  • Jeremiah L. Slocum, cordwainer
  • Isaac S. Whitford, cordwainer
  • J. W.Howland,  do
  • Abiel Chandler, millwright
  • Kingsley Bullock, mason
  • John P. Roberts, watchmaker
  • William C. Greene, ropemaker
  • James Slocum, tailor              .
  • James A. Capron, carpenter
  • Jonathan Johnson, carpenter
  • [Name illegible] machinist
  • Ezra Pollard, machinist
  • Nicholas Thomas, machinist
  • Oliver Weekes, Jr. cordwainer
  • Rufus King Foss, machinist
  • Samuel Harrington, machinist
  • Daniel Miller, carpenter

Page 15, col. 2

  • John M. Spence, bootmaker
  • William Tibbits, bootmaker
  • Samuel R. Rice, cordwainer
  • Rhodes W. Perkins, carpenter
  • William S. Roberts, segar maker
  • Thomas W. Gorton, cordwainer
  • David W. Hunt, painter
  • Fones G. Hill, carpenter
  • Gardiner Tanner, dresser tender
  • Elisha Potter, blacksmith
  • Elijah Bacon, mechanic
  • James Tenant,  do
  • Perry Greene,  do
  • Nicholas Dawley, carpenter
  • Gideon Willcox, blacksmith
  • Samuel R. Aylsworth, weaver
  • John F. Mar,  do
  • Schuyler Fisher, smith
  • James Miller, cordwainer
  • Wm. J. Shelden, house carpenter
  • Thomas Lockwood, mason
  • Russel Young,  do
  • Russell Johnson, wheelwright
  • William Burdick, machinist
  • Silas Weaver, tailor
  • Oliver A. Budlong, carpenter
  • Joseph W. Ladd,  do
  • Ezra Simnons [mis-transcription of Simmons?], hatter
  • Caleb Simnons [mis-transcription of Simmons?],  do
  • George Vaughn, carpenter
  • Thomas A. Howland, cordwainer
  • Job Whitmarsh, carpenter
  • Benjamin Burdine, cabinet maker
  • Oliver Weekes, carpenter
  • John Cornell,  do
  • Richard Edwards, cooper
  • Silas B. Whitford, tobacconist
  • Jamu Buhee, carpenter
  • Oliver A. Whitman, blacksmith
  • J. Bundick,  saddler
  • Gorton Spencer, machinist
  • Elisha May,  do
  • Thomas Tiflinghast, carpenter
  • Arbe J. Place, blacksmith
  • Russel Card, cooper
  • Samuel Sweet, carpenter
  • Stephen Briggs,  do
  • William Merrill,  do
  • Rowland Greene,  do
  • William Penniger, machinist
  • Cromwell T. Salisbury, brass founder
  • Oliver C. G. Arnold, machinist
  • John Weeden, carpenter
  • Daniel B. Bartholie, shoemaker
  • John W. Johnson, carpenter
  • Nathaniel H. Coles,  do
  • John B. Carr,  do
  • Jerah N. Gardner,  do
  • Laton Greene,  do

Page 16, col. 1

  • Bowen Hill, carpenter
  • Job Manchester, chairmaker
  • Anthony B. Fenner, carpenter
  • James B. Peirce, mechanic
  • Samuel Allen, machinist
  • Thomas R. Tilley, ropemaker
  • Thomas J. Johnson, mechanic
  • Thomas Peirce, shoemaker
  • Samuel R. Peirce,  do
  • Augustus Spencer, carpenter
  • Emery Fisk, machinist
  • Ezra Spencer, mason
  • Joseph Greene, ropemaker
  • John Proud, chair maker
  • Daniel Briggs, carpenter
  • Edward Capron,  do
  • Joel Parker
  • Preserved Briggs, machinist
  • Philip Tillinghast
  • Nelson H. Benson
  • William A. Hubbard, M. D.
  • Lodowick W. Shipper, machinist
  • Walter Spencer, carpenter
  • Benjamin Rogers, laborer
  • John Spencer, Jun., mason
  • Pardon Spencer, carpenter
  • Edward Bliss, mechanic
  • Reuben S. Peckham, machinist
  • William R. Budlong, machinist
  • Jesse Brown, Jun., mechanic
  • James Tilley,  do
  • Samuel F. Carr,  do
  • Green A. Sweet,  do
  • Robert M. Bennett, carpenter
  • Daniel McIntosh, dyer
  • V. Field, carder
  • Joseph R. Stone, machinist
  • Joseph Taylor, laborer
  • Robert H. Coggeshall, carpenter
  • Benoni King, weaver
  • William C. Van Doorn, mechanic
  • Silas Clapp, farmer
  • Jeremiah Bailey, mechanic    
  • Mason Smith, spinner
  • Thomas P. R. A. Knox, mechanic
  • John Dye, shoemaker
  • Sanford Durfee
  • Theophilus Crowell, laborer
  • Jonathan Andrew, farmer
  • Abiezer 0. Hood, machinist
  • Jona. Smith
  • Joseph Taylor, Jun., spinner
  • Alexander McDonald, dyer
  • James McEnerney, laborer
  • Michael Fitzgerald,  do
  • Clarke Spink,  do
  • Henry Case,  do
  • William Rowley, cordwainer
  • Robert Lawless, laborer

Page 16, col. 2

  • Isaac Hall, carder
  • William Sweet, farmer
  • William J. Potter,  do
  • Alanson Wood, carpenter
  • William M. Mowry, tailor
  • Henry Warren, caroer
  • Thomas Saunders, spinner
  • Horace Johnson,  do
  • Randall Holden, machinist
  • Albert G. Smith,  do
  • Fairbanks,  do
  • William B. Corey, spinner
  • Nicholas Phillips, laborer
  • Jesse Brown, mason
  • William Rice, carpenter
  • James R. Whitman, farmer
  • Paul Spencer, machinist
  • Nathaniel H. Gardiner, farmer
  • Samuel L. Brayton, spinner
  • Thomas Taylor, mechanic
  • Perry Potter, laborer
  • Joshua Carpenter,  do
  • Samuel Anderson,  do
  • Jonathan C. Taylor, mechanic
  • William S. Holden,  do
  • William Davis, machinist
  • Ebenezer Spencer, do
  • Elisha G. Smith,  do
  • Wilhard Harding, spinner
  • Benjamin A. Briggs, machinist
  • Laiton Johnson, spinner
  • John Higgins, mechanic
  • Job Peirce, cordwainer
  • Jonathan Tiffany, Jun., mechanic
  • Stacy W. Remington, laborer
  • Benjamin Tabor, cordwainer
  • Thomas Reynolds, laborer
  • William Shipper, farmer
  • Amherst Hopkins, laborer
  • John Baker,  mason
  • Austin Sawyer
  • William Tobey
  • Nelson Barnes
  • Ira Arnold
  • Emor Angell
  • America Wheeler
  • Luke Burbank
  • Pardon Angell
  • Joseph Turner
  • Samuel B. Ashton
  • Jeremiah Luther
  • Daniel Carpenter
  • Ethan Sweet
  • Albert B. Sweet
  • Joseph Munro
  • Waterman F. Brown
  • Benjamin W. Lang
  • Willard Usher
  • Edward Gavit

Page 17, col. 1

  • Ebenezer Perkins
  • Darius Colvin
  • Samuel E. Slocum
  • Thomas G. Pitman, tanner and currier
  • Robert P. Lee, mast and spar maker
  • Wm. W. Freeborn, tanner and currier
  • Joseph Lyon, coppersmith
  • W. H. Crandall, ship builder
  • William Weeden, housewright
  • Thomas W. Brown, tailor
  • Benjamin H. Tisdale, jeweller
  • James Atkinson, printer
  • Adam S. Coe, cabinet maker
  • Joshua Tripp, leather dresser
  • Wm. S. Nichols, gold and silver smith
  • Michael  Freeborn, blacksmith
  • Anthony V. Taylor, cabinet maker
  • Erastus P. Allan, baker
  • John Stevens, tin plate worker
  • John Williams, cordwainer
  • Theophilus Topham, baker
  • Thomas Mumford, cordwainer
  • Zenas L. Hammond, painter
  • Peleg Sanford, block maker
  • Edward Smith, cooper
  • James B. Hoyt, blacksmith
  • George Freeborn, housewright
  • W. H. Gorton, painter
  • Thomas Swinburne, painter
  • Thomas Spooner, chairmaker
  • Edward Hammett, Jun., carpenter
  • William Briggs, carpenter
  • John Tompkins , block and pump mak’r
  • [Ill.] cabinet maker
  • Moses Norman carpenter
  • James Martin blockmaker
  • Charles H. Mumford, jeweller
  • Noah Barker, carpenter
  • Charles Lawton, tobacconist
  • John Horswell, tailor
  • Isaac R. Spooner, housewright
  • Wm. H. Greene, tailor
  • Samael H. Lawton, tobacconist
  • Edward T. Allan, baker
  • William Brownell, tin plate worker
  • Robert W. Hammett, carpenter
  • Albert Cottrell,  do  
  • Henry G. Tompkins, blockmaker
  • Hugh T Brightman, mason
  • William S. Carpenter, mason
  • Stephen M. Stedman, cabinet maker
  • C. A. Sweet, ship smith
  • Edward D. Jones, do
  • B. Trevett, cabinet maker
  • George N. Allan, baker
  • Wanton S. Sherman, butcher
  • James Holt,  do
  • James Simmons, blacksmith
  • James W. Allan, baker

Page 17, col. 2

  • David Brannan, cordwainer
  • Samuel Vaughan, housewright
  • John B. Weeden,  do
  • John B. Barker, house carpenter
  • Samuel H. Oxx, Jun., housewright
  • J. N. Coddington, chaise maker
  • Charles Babcock, housewright
  • Edwin Peabody,  do
  • Josiah Tew, ropemaker
  • Henry Tisdale, jeweller
  • Thomas Harkness, rope maker
  • Jeremiah Goodspeed, housewright
  • Joshua Brannan, ship Joiner
  • Henry Hill, carpenter
  • Alexander Jack, cordwainer
  • E. Manchester, housewright
  • Joseph B Weaver, hatter
  • James M. C. Campbell,  do
  • Alden S. Simmons, carpenter
  • Daniel B. Davis, cordwainer
  • John C. Ailman,  do
  • Joseph Sanford, Jun,, housewright
  • Jeremiah Hazard, boot maker
  • Richard Clarke, cabinet maker
  • Jesse Dunham, chair maker
  • John Clarke, carpenter
  • Samuel Pratt,  do 
  • Thomas P.  Rodman, printer
  • James A. Green, housewright
  • William Hall, mason
  • Robert Seatle, cordwainer
  • James W. Dennis,  do
  • John Alger, mason
  • Giles Barney, blacksmith
  • John Clark, cordwainer
  • Wm. C. Thurston, housewright
  • John Clark, shoemaker
  • Robert M. Franklin, Jun., baker
  • Joshua W. Tripp, leather dresser
  • Cornelius B. Wilbour, blacksmith
  • W. S. Randolph, manufacturer
  • Benjamin R. Dawley, coach maker
  • Alexander Morgan, wheelwright
  • James Shaw, blacksmith
  • Perry C. Irish, shoemaker
  • Caleb Cranston, butcher
  • George W. Allen, blacksmith
  • Isaac Stall, coach maker
  • Israel F. Luke, cordwainer
  • lsaac Read,  do
  • Ephraim B. lrish, shoemaker
  • Thos. Pitman, Jun., tanner and currier
  • Silas Ward, tallow chandler
  • R. G. Robinson, saddle & harness mak.
  • Eben Winslow, cordwainer
  • Henry J. Cranston, baker
  • J. B. Wilbour, clock and watch maker
  • Sylvanus Wilbour,  do
  • Stephen Cahoone, painter

Page 18, col. 1

  • Caleb C. Mumford, cordwainer
  • Thomas Coggershall,  do
  • M. McGregor, mason
  • John J. Allan, baker
  • Henry Holt, cooper
  • Wm. H. Melville, tin plate worker
  • John Marsh. tallow chandler
  • William J. Tilley, tailor
  • David H. Burdick, cordwainer
  • James Horswell, tailor
  • E. F. Newton, clock & watch maker
  • Henry G. Place. boot and shoe maker
  • Benjamin H. Ailman,  do
  • Joseph B. Seatle, shoemaker
  • William W. Vernon, painter
  • William Swan, Jun., tailor
  • William Lovie, hair dresser
  • Glearer J. Read, painter
  • Charles E. Davenport, mason
  • Michael Molten, housewright
  • George H. Price,  do
  • Samuel J. Marsh, chair maker
  • Samuel Freeborn, baker
  • William R. Atkinson, cordwainer
  • Joseph M. Marsh, house carpenter
  • Job Cornell,  do
  • Thomas J. Manchester,  do
  • Henry Barber, bookbinder
  • William A. Barber, printer
  • Henry J. Hudson, painter and glazier
  • Thomas M. Seabury, blacksmith
  • William Molten, housewright
  • William D. Boss, wheelwright
  • Abraham Almy,  do
  • William D. Southwick, boat builder
  • James Albro,  do
  • George W.  Taylor,  do
  • John Goff, brewer
  • Joseph Southwick, boat builder
  • Benjamin C. Eddy, goldsmith
  • Benjamin Marble, ship builder
  • Alim Cravell,  do
  • Eliab King, ship carpenter
  • Nathaniel H. Read, house carpenter
  • Lewis Barlow, boat builder
  • Wm. Barlow,   do
  • William Caswell, rope maker
  • Pitts Southwick, boat builder
  • Silas Southwick,  do
  • Job S. Eldred,  do
  • Lewis B. Caswell,  do
  • Samuel Simpson, blacksmith
  • William K. Covell, boat builder
  • William F. Smith,  do
  • John Hull, tailor
  • Benjamin Southwick, boat builder
  • Jeremiah Greenman, ship carpenter
  • Samuel Stanton, Jun.,  do
  • Isaac P. Maryott,  do

Page 18, col. 2

  • Amos Crandall, shipwright
  • Isaac Manwaring, caulker
  • Henry L. Thurston, shipwright
  • John P. Cornell,  do
  • Charles Barber,  do
  • Ebenezer Coleman,  do
  • Parmenus Skinner, ship joiner
  • George H. Lewis, shipwright
  • Joshua Wilbour, tailor
  • Jonathan Baker, mason
  • Arnold Draper, carpenter
  • Seth C. Bradford, housewright
  • Thomas Taber,  do
  • John N. Barlow, house and ship painter
  • Thomas Burt, mason
  • Robert Dennis, baker
  • John S. Weeden, cabinet maker
  • James R. Newton, silversmith
  • James N. [illegible] shipwright
  • Philip Roach, ship carpenter
  • John Mills, spar maker
  • Walter W. Simmons, shipwright
  • George Cornell,   do
  • Jared Barber,  do
  • Raymond Durfee,  do
  • Thomas Stevens,  do
  • James Ailman,  do
  • Patrick Boyles,  do.
  • David W. Cornell,  do
  • John W.  Bacheller,  do
  • Henry N. Merit,  do
  • Alexander Christie, mason
  • Isaiah Goodspeed, carpenter
  • Josiah Sherman,  do
  • Fenner Brown, manufacturer
  • Isaac Sisson,  machinist
  • Charles Green, cordwainer
  • Abiel Spencer, cabinet maker
  • William S. Lawton,  do
  • Thomas Goddard,  do
  • Matthew Cozzens, hatter
  • John Cozzens, rigger
  • William B. Peabody, cordwainer
  • Philip Stephens, stone cutter
  • Hanson Hall, boat builder
  • Anthony Manuel, hatter
  • Stephen Goddard,  do
  • Joseph C. Lawton, painter and glazier
  • Benjamin Anthony, carpenter
  • John D. Cornell, cabinet maker
  • Daniel Flanders, housewright
  • Perry W. Freeborn, coppersmith
  • William W. Freeborn, Jun., tanner
  • Peleg Coggeshall, cordwainer
  • John Barber, tailor
  • John N. Potter, cordwainer
  • Charles Sherman, butcher
  • William Lee, spar maker
  • Charles W. Burdick, cordwainer

Page 19, col. 1

  • Samuel Lee, spar maker
  • Thomas Hazard, house carpenter
  • Nicholas B. Anthony, spar maker
  • Peleg Clarke, cooper
  • Gideon C. Smith, cotton manufacturer
  • Albert Draper, dresser
  • John W. Wall,  do
  • Michael Eddy, Jun., goods baler
  • William Lewis, mule spinner
  • John Millington,  do
  • Benjamin D. Peck, do
  • Elisha A. Clark, weaver
  • John Glover, mule spinner
  • Patrick McNally,  do
  • George Scott,  do
  • John Pattinson,  do
  • Francis Scott, carder
  • John Lewis, mule spinner
  • John Livsey, engineer
  • Benjamin S. Seatle, house carpenter
  • Joseph Clarke, cooper
  • John C. Clarke, Jun., block maker
  • Benjamin Taylor, carpenter
  • Charles C. Hammet, block maker
  • Alexander Murray, mason
  • Beriah Crandall, house carpenter
  • Christopher J. Bliven, house carpenter
  • Henry W. Vernon, cabinet maker
  • James E. Townsend, cabinet maker
  • Borden A. Norton, upholsterer
  • William S. Springer, cabinet maker
  • Peter Lawton, cabinet maker
  • William Jarvis, house and ship joiner
  • William A. Coggeshall, cabinet maker
  • John J. Weaver, hatter
  • Benjamin Marsh, Jun., boot and shoemaker
  • Henry W. Carr, shoemaker·
  • Isaac Pickett, shoemaker
  • John W. Stevens, distiller
  • Nathaniel Holt, butcher
  • Isaac Coddington, gold and silversmith
  • Ephraim Cobleigh, shoemaker
  • James Westgate, baker
  • William B. Lewis, shoemaker
  • Oscar F. Wentworth, painter
  • Gideon Lawton, house carpenter
  • William McKenzie, mason
  • John Nicol,  do
  • Samuel A. Parker, hatter
  • George Read, mason
  • Gideon Gray, mason
  • Abraham Barker, upholsterer
  • Eleazar Allen, cooper
  • Parker Lawton, carpenter
  • Simeon Coggeshall, carpenter
  • Jonathan W. Coggeshall, carpenter
  • laaac Gifford, carpenter
  • Albert Coggeshall, carpenter

Page 19, col. 2

  • Charles Gifford, carpenter
  • Isaac Hedly, carpenter
  • Benjamin Easton, carpenter
  • Daniel M. Peckham, mason
  • Barker Fish,  carpenter
  • Edwin J. Spooner, sailmaker
  • Job Tew, ropemaker
  • Joseph Tew, ropemaker
  • John Spooner, carpenter
  • William J. Holt, carpenter
  • William Burgess, carpenter
  • Alfred Hudson, ropemaker
  • Nathan B. Hammett, carpenter
  • Thomas Burk, leather-dresser
  • William Stevens, painter and glazier
  • Moses Woodbury, carpenter
  • Smith Busworth carpenter
  • William Coggeshall, cordwainer
  • Isaac C. Peckham, block maker
  • Joseph Nason, tin-plate worker
  • Andrew Melville, pewterer
  • Samuel A. Barnitt, clothier
  • Benjamin Price, baker
  • Samuel Tuell, blockmaker
  • Robert Sherman, 2d, butcher
  • Peter P. Remington, cordwainer
  • John Goff, sailmaker
  • William Goff, brewer
  • Samuel B. Harris, manufacturer
  • Nathaniel H. Langley, cooper
  • James W.  Langley, cooper
  • William T. Burroughs, cooper
  • Peter W.  Wilkey, cooper
  • William H. Ailman, cooper
  • James M. Tuell,  block maker
  • John C. Thurston, carpenter
  • Edward Stanhope, Jun., machinist
  • John Henderson, cooper
  • James Henderson, cooper
  • Joseph Aylsworth, cooper
  • John W. Williams, sailmaker
  • Joseph Sanford, cabinet maker
  • John H. Hammond, blockmaker
  • Silas H. Cottrell, ship carpenter
  • William Kaull, blacksmith
  • Russel Cottrell, ship carpenter
  • Alfred Barker, upholsterer
  • John W. Davis, cordwainer
  • Thomas G. Brown,  tailor
  • John Riley, shoemaker
  • Oliver Durfee,  do.
  • Nicholas Powers, shoemaker
  • John Pitman, housewright
  • Joseph F.  Havens, stone mason
  • Isaac W. Sherman, butcher
  • Christopher P. Boss, cordwainer
  • William Mitchell, cotton manufacturer
  • William Durfee, tobacconist
  • G. B. Reynolds, cordwainer

Page 20, col. 1

  • William B. Swan, tailor
  • E. J. Swan, tailor
  • R. Swan,  do
  • James C. Swan, stock maker
  • William F. Barker, machinist
  • Samuel S. Mumford, tailor
  • Gilbert Tompkins, house carpenter
  • John Goff, tanner and currier
  • Abraham Tilley, ropemaker
  • Robert M. Simmons,  do
  • Nicholas Alger,  do
  • William Bacheller,  do
  • Abrm. Tilley, Jun.,  do
  • John Lake,  do
  • Joseph Freeborn, tanner and currier
  • James L. Tilley, ropemaker
  • John H. Moore,  do
  • Joshua Stacey, do
  • Truman B. Spooner
  • Perry Sherman, butcher
  • Michael M. Friend, house carpenter
  • T. Stacey, Jun., confectioner
  • William Tilley, ropemaker
  • William Barber, printer
  • John  Hammond, painter
  • Joseph King, caulker
  • Benjamin Hall, cordwainer
  • Fitzgerald Slocum, baker
  • Chester Clark, cabinet maker
  • Samuel H. Jack, plumber
  • William Fludder, mason
  • William Lee, 2d, spar maker
  • Robert Goffe, shoemaker
  • Thomas Roads, carpenter
  • Benjamin Clark, cooper
  • James B. Cahoone, carpenter
  • Stephen Thomas, carriage maker
  • Davenport S. Simmons,  do
  • Edmund Freeborn, wheelwright
  • William E. Cook, blacksmith
  • Samuel Clarke, wool manufacturer
  • John H. Coggeshall, house carpenter
  • Thomas Gould, clothier
  • Isaac P. Durfee,  do
  • Edward Coggeshall, house carpenter
  • Jesse T. Durfee, blacksmith
  • Richmond Carr, house carpenter
  • Martin Dedrick, cordwainer
  • Benjamin Pearce, cabinet maker
  • John Hedly, housewright
  • Isaac S. Corey, shoemaker
  • William Borden, blacksmith
  • Pardon Corey, shoemaker
  • David Fish, house carpenter
  • Henry Lawton,   do
  • Noah Gray, blacksmith
  • Gideon Dennis, cooper
  • Preserved Fish, blacksmith
  • Isaac Freeborn, cabinet maker

Page 20, col. 2

  • George Dennis, weaver
  • Thomas Borden, blacksmith
  • Southwick Irish, boat builder
  • Joseph Irish,  do
  • Isaac Borden, machinist
  • Nathan Dennis, cabinet maker
  • Henry Fish, housewright
  • Joseph Cornel, stone mason
  • Isaac Freeborn, cabinet maker
  • Peleg Hadly. 2d, wheelwright
  • Joseph Childs, shoemaker
  • Horace Lawton, blacksmith
  • William H. Driscol, cooper
  • John Luther, housewright
  • William Collins, Jun., cooper
  • Pardon Hiscox, boat builder
  • James Smith, Jun., tin plate worker
  • Samuel Blake, cordwainer
  • Reuel H. Baker, cooper
  • Henry W. Child, tailor
  • George Easterbrooks, housewright
  • Elisha Graves, cooper
  • Thomas Lisson, do
  • William Haile, Jun., housewright
  • Caleb Carr, shipwright
  • Caleb Carr, Jun.,  do
  • Hiram Andrews, cordwainer
  • Anthony Hallenbuke,  do
  • Benjamin T. Cranston, sailmaker
  • Thomas Cranston,  do
  • William L. Brown, housewright
  • Martin L. Salisbury, tailor
  • Charles Luther, carpenter
  • Benjamin M. Bosworth, machinist
  • John Pearce, Jun., housewright
  • Cromwell Barney,  do
  • Joseph Short, cordwainer
  • Samuel Maxwell, housewright
  • Andrew Johonnot,  do
  • Amos M. Bullock,  do
  • Oliver Johonnot, saddle, harness, and trunk maker
  • Turner Carr, shipwright
  • William G. Hiscox, boat builder
  • Peleg Bosworth, machinist
  • Lewis Hoar, painter
  • Benjamin Cole, carpenter
  • William Cornell, cooper
  • Francis Marble, blacksmith
  • Enos Bart, shipwright
  • John G. Bowen, painter
  • Martin Salisbury, cooper
  • Luther Bosworth,  do
  • John B. Mason,  do
  • Jonathan B. Barton,  do
  • Martin King,  do
  • Rhodolphus Johnson,  do
  • Jonathan Luther, housewright
  • James A. Thornton, cabinet maker

Page 21, col 1

  • George G. Johonnet, cabinet maker
  • George R. Peck,  do
  • John Stockford, ropemaker
  • George Luther, cordwainer
  • Lawton Kelly,  do
  • George Woodmancy,  do
  • Stephen S [Swasey?]. cooper
  • William B Lawton, sailmaker
  • Nathan M Blake, blacksmith
  • Stephen Mason, tanner and currier
  • William Baker, cooper
  • Jeremiah Woodmancy, cordwainer
  • Lewis T Thorn, housewright
  • Nathaniel D. Maxfield,  do
  • James E. Bowen, ropemaker
  • William R. Clarke,  do
  • Benjamin Foster,  do
  • George Butts,  do
  • Henry S. [Busbee?]  do
  • George S. Tilley,  do
  • Pardon Hiscox, Jun., boat builder
  • Henry Bailey, housewright
  • Phineas Howard,  do
  • Isaac L. Peck, tailor
  • John P. Winslow, brass founder
  • Josias L. Peck, blacksmith
  • Jonathan Simmons, [chaine?] maker
  • Marcus Read, housewright
  • Edwin Sanders, baker
  • Stephen Johnson, cooper
  • John H. Munro, tailor
  • Joseph Burt, housewright
  • John Pearce,  do
  • Alvan Burt, rigger
  • Philip M. Baker, tailor
  • Benjamin Shearman,  do
  • Nathaniel Adams, blacksmith
  • John Andrews, shoemaker
  • George Munro, cooper
  • John J. Bickner,  do
  • Stillman Welsh,  do
  • William B. Snell, cabinet maker
  • John Herley, carver
  • Samuel S. Driscol, printer
  • James Cole, cooper
  • John Butts,  do
  • Sylvester S. Newman, shoemaker
  • Benjamin Child, ropemaker
  • George T. Gardner, cooper
  • George Thurber, cordwainer
  • Levi Wheaton, tailor
  • Sylvester Childs, watchmaker
  • Charles Randall, printer
  • Henry Sanders, baker
  • George W. Pearce, printer
  • Alfred R. Cornell, cooper
  • Leonard B. Bigelow, tool maker
  • James V. Cole, joiner
  • John H. Hart,  do

Page 21, col. 2

  • Hiram Goff, joiner
  • Henry Cole, bootmaker
  • Gershom C. Jenckes,  do
  • Richard Beers,  do
  • Nathan L. [Barnes?], tool maker
  • Hollis Sawtell, blacksmith
  • Henry B. Salisbury, tailor
  • James L. Swetland,  do
  • Ebenezer Luther, cordwainer
  • Daniel Bosworth, hatter
  • Ezra O. Child, cordwainer
  • Nathan Daval, shoemaker
  • Gardner Winslow,  do
  • Ephraim French, saddler
  • John D. Tuell, coppersmith
  • Thomas K. Phinnas, mason
  • Benjamin C. Short,  do
  • Gardner Munro,  do
  • Henry W. Eddy, printer
  • Alvan Cole, boss cordwainer
  • William A. Wiley, cordwainer
  • Daniel T. Hubbard, do
  • Henry Parker,  do
  • William H. Turner, housewright
  • Nathan Luther, shoemaker
  • Isaac B. Barrus,  do
  • S. E. Newman, stock marker
  • William Harding, barber
  • Samuel Pearce, housewright
  • Shubael Burr, cooper
  • J. G. Salisbury,  do
  • Allen Chase,  do
  • Andrew B. Rood, shoemaker
  • Jacob Sanders, housewright
  • William H Bowen,  do
  • Edward H. Thurston, tailor
  • Thomas Salisbury, hatter
  • T.C. Williams, tin plate worker
  • Joseph Luther, shoemaker
  • Samuel Thurber, mason
  • Elbridge Millerd,  do
  • Alfred Bosworth, hatter
  • George A. Brown, machinist
  • Daniel R. Whitman, weaver
  • Ray G. Andrews,  do
  • Varnum Dawley,  do
  • William Tisdale, dresser tender
  • Daniel Dyer, carder
  • Bowen Angell, caprneter
  • William [illegible], mule spinner
  • Allen Whitman, machinist
  • James R. Case,  do
  • John Allen,  do
  • Seth J. Lawton, shoemaker
  • Joseph W. Holden, cloth trimmer
  • Charles Potter, mule spinner
  • William [Tourjee?],  do
  • Nelson Williams, weaver
  • Geo. Bates

Page 22, col. 1

  • John B. [illegible,] cordwainer
  • Gorton Burges, woollen manufacturer
  • Amos Sherman, mule spinner
  • William Congdon
  • Joseph L. Davis, blacksmith
  • Benjamin [illegible,] mule spinner
  • Samuel T. Dedrick, machinist
  • Samuel P. Sweet, tailor
  • Lyman Barney, wheelwright
  • Ebenezer Williams, dresser tender
  • Stephen Thornton, cordwainer
  • Andrew Arnold, farmer
  • Horace Smith, blacksmith
  • Benjamin Read, weaver
  • Christopher Greene, Sen., carpenter
  • John H. Arnold,  do
  • Nicholas Arnold,  do
  • Otis Martin,  do
  • William Stafford, painter
  • Edwin P. Macombar, artisan
  • Levi Bradford, carpenter
  • Ira D. Phillips, mule spinner
  • Samuel Tanner, mechanic
  • Benjamin Barber, mule spinner
  • Lillibridge Ward,  do
  • Chester Fay, carder
  • Moses Whitman, carpenter
  • Thomas J. Rathbun, mule spinner

Page 22, col. 2

  • Thomas Johnson, mule spinner
  • Hiram Stephen,  do
  • Isaac Nichols, carder
  • John T. Barnarda mule spinner
  • Sylvester Manchester, dresser tender
  • James Adams, dresser tender
  • Hozar Ennis, mariner
  • John Woodard, card maker
  • William Merrel, machinist
  • Amo West, mason
  • Stephen Albro, cabinet maker
  • Asa Crandall, artisan
  • Stevants Hines, dresser maker
  • Pardon Crandall, mule spinner
  • George Hamer, dresser tender
  • John Roward,  do
  • Ebenezer Crojee,  do
  • Amo G. Fenner, weaver
  • William Cranston, mule spinner
  • Patrick Dunn, artisan
  • Palmer Sheldon, cooper
  • Thomas Doyle, bookbinder
  • Samuel Pike, blacksmith
  • Piedman F. Claflin, tobacconist
  • Charles Jenks, Jun., cartwright
  • John Pike, turner
  • Phineas Potter, pump maker
This 1834 watch paper graphic was passed along by Cherry Bamberg who points out that its inner border reads reads “Personal Attention to Fine Watch & Clock Repairing, at Prices Conforming with the Depressed Times.” The graphic is part of a watch paper collection from the American Antiquarian Society. –Babcock, Fred W., “Fred W. Babcock Providence R.I.,” Watch Papers Collection, accessed July 30, 2020, https://americanantiquarian.org/watchpaperscollection/items/show/1976.

TEXT of the petition

Sir:                                                                 Providence, April -, 1834.

   The resolutions following were adopted in convention of mechanics and artisans, assembled from various towns in the State, at Providence, on Monday, March 24; and by direction of the convention, we now transmit you a copy.

   Whereas, a sudden and unexpected change in the condition and prospect of the mechanics and artisans of this State has been wrought within a few months past, without the occurrence of any natural calamity or the act of any foreign power: and whereas this portion of citizens residing in different parts of the State, have simultaneously entertained and expressed their views in relation to this change, which has resulted in the choice of delegates from several towns and villages in the State, to meet in convention in this city, to take into consideration the present depressed state of business, and to memorialize Congress for relief; and the delegates having now convened for this purpose; therefore, it is by this convention

   Resolved, That we consider the welfare of the people to be the object and the end of government; and that the condition of the people is the best evidence of the character of the Government.

   Resolved, That the present stagnation of business alike interests the agriculturist, the mechanic, and the laborer; for, amidst so general desolation, few escape.

   Resolved, That tho present suffering of every mechanical profession, and the want of employment for the industry and labor of our State, can be justly attributed to no other cause than the interference of the executive branch of the Government with the currency of the country, and the consequent distrust which pervades all business, and paralyzes all enterprise.

  Resolved, That the experience of past years has fully shown the necessity of a National Bank, and that the currency and prosperity of a country should not be the subject of a speculative experiment.

  Resolved, That the restoration of the public deposites to the United States Bank, with a renewal of the charter of that Bank, under such modifications as Congress in its wisdom may direct, or the incorporation of a new bank, presents the strongest hope of a revival of confidence, and of the return of a suffering people to their business and to the comforts of life.

                                                              STANFORD NEWEL, President.

THOHAS DOYLE, of Providence,    

JAS. ATKINSON, of Newport,

Secreteries

[Gala & Seaton, print.]

To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled:

The undersigned mechanics and artisans, residing in nearly all the towns in the

State of Rhode Island,

RESPECTFULL Y REPRESENT:

   That your memorialists are of the various occupations in life, embraced within the mechanical professions; and that the present unexampled distress, which pervades the whole country, has covered our community with gloom and sorrow, and presses with peculiar severity upon us who labor for our support. The present disordered state of the national currency, and the destruction of confidence in every department of business, have suspended enterprise, paralyzed industry, and left the honest poor without employment.

   Your memorialists disclaim all connexion with party politics, and with those questions which agitate the political divisions of society. If protected in their labor, and paid in sound and unshaken currency, they trust with confidence to their industry for a just reward.

   Our section is emphatically a manufacturing section of the country; and the manufacture of cotton alone is estimated to consume thirty thousand bales annually. In the erection of mills and dwellings, and in the manufacture of gearing and machinery, the carpenter and mason, the iron founder, machinist, artisan, and laborer, have hitherto found employment, and shared in the general prosperity. Every trade and occupation participated in the benefit common to all, and a sound and healthy state of mutual dependence and mutual interest gave assurance of continued success.

   Within the last five months the picture has become sadly reversed. Already have more than fifty thousand spindles been stopped, throwing out of employ a great number of persons, and at least as many more are running only in the hope of a favorable change. No new establishments are projected, and the mechanic is without employ; a numerous population, whose industrious habits of life and skill in the various mechanical operations arc not exceeded in our whole country, are thrown back upon the savings of years of unceasing toil, or cast upon the charity of a community whose sufferings are little less than their own.

   Your memorialists would further respectfully show, that in the various iron foundries in this State, in the years 1831, 1832, and the first half of 1833, the annual consumption of pig iron exceeded twenty-four hundred and seventy-five tons; a large portion of which was the product of our own country. The consumption is now at a less rate than three hundred and fifty tons per annum, and this quantity is daily decreasing. The number of hands heretofore employed in the same furnaces was three hundred, mostly heads of families; that number is now reduced to about fifty.

   In regard to the lumber business, your memorialists have procured statements from the lumber merchants in Providence only. It appears that, at this season of the year, they have hitherto been under contract for lumber to the amount of at least seventy thousand dollars; and at the present time have ordered but fourteen hundred dollars. They state further, that their retail trade has fallen off from fifty to seventy per cent. The master builders, some of whom, the last year, employed more than twenty journeymen, are now without any contracts; and, consequently, most of their hands have been discharged. In various furnaces and shops there have been annually consumed more than nine hundred tons of anthra­ cite coal from the mines in Pennsylvania, and one hundred and twenty tons of a bituminous quality from the coal mines in Virginia. The consumption of this article must have decreased more than fifty per cent. In wrought iron from the ore of the middle States, the quantity heretofore consumed in various mechanical uses has been large. The consumption has diminished nearly one-half. Indeed, in every branch of our various occupations, the materials used and the labor employed have decreased in an equal ratio to those before stated.  This universal stagnation of business, and the deep distress which pervades all classes of the community, this system of contraction which has brought misery to all our dwellings, and condemned so many deserving poor to idleness and want, ought to arrest the attention of the constituted authorities of Government.

   Your memorialists have sought the cause of this sudden and fearful change, and can attribute it only to the derangement of the currency, and the consequent derangement of commercial confidence, increased by apprehensions of future instability. Your memorialists can hope for no favorable change, unless through the interposition of Congress, as guardians of the general welfare. They, therefore, ask from Congress a consideration of the distressed condition of the country; trusting confidently in their wisdom to adopt such measures as will restore confidence, re-animate enterprise, and open to industry its accustomed channels of action and support.

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Recently, I discovered that the pages of the Rhode Island portion of the federal 1820 Census of Manufactures have been made available on FamilySearch.org.  The same content for Connecticut and Massachusetts is also online.

Manufacturing in 1820

I’d like to review the state of manufacturing and then explain why I believe this will be very helpful in finding your ancestors.

After the Revolutionary War ended in the 1780’s, the U.S. was anxious to reduce its dependence on British imports which had been, prior to the war, imposed on them by law. Manufacturing of cotton and wool threads and fabrics began at about the same time that the rocky, inadequate farmlands of southeastern New England could no longer support growing families. Younger generations of farmers either fled to states north and west for better farmland, or took on work in nearby manufacturing, sometimes by performing piecework at home, sometimes by reporting for work onsite. This transition occurred over the period of, say, 1790 to 1840. After 1850, the expansion of mills in both size and number tended to be supported more by immigrant labor than by labor pulled from New England’s farms.

The machinery needed for large-scale manufacture of thread and fabric had been duplicated from machinery in use in England in the 1780’s by Samuel Slater and his partners in Pawtucket, Rhode Island (see more here). The invention of the cotton gin in the south in 1793 led to a boom in cotton production and popularity. Slater Mill was quickly followed by an explosion of new mills, small at first, which began cropping up along New England’s waterways … even a very minor river might be made to provide enough water power for a mill. In Rhode Island, in addition to textile manufacture, the manufacture of the machinery itself also became an important industry.

The federal 1820 Census of Manufactures was taken at a disastrous time for New England manufacturing. Embargoes of British manufactured goods put in place during the War of 1812 had led to booming times for New England manufacturing (since there was no competition with British goods) followed by a bust in the second half of the 1810’s when the embargoes had been lifted and cheaper, higher quality European goods flooded back into the market.  By the time of the 1820 federal census, the federal government was desperate for facts and figures on the stalled manufacturing sector, perhaps hoping that some solution could be found.

Imagine the job of the poor census taker in 1820, forced to approach every manufacturing business in his territory and inquire about how much they were producing, how business was going, how much equipment they owned, and what their financial situation was. In virtually every case they were met with anger, hopelessness and glorious tales of times gone by, no longer really relevant to the job of collecting data on today’s business. So the data collected was spotty, and sometimes reported on businesses which were actually closed down.

Why this is important

There are three major takeaways for genealogists from this census, explained further in the paragraphs that follow:

  1. Since the 1820 Federal Census population schedule (the “normal” census, not this special schedule) reports on the number of household members engaged in Manufactures, that should tip you off to whether your family was working in a mill.
  2. Many Rhode Island children worked in mills in 1820. The idea of child labor was carried over from the farms; children would have worked there, and when the family went to mill work, it was natural for the children to play a role. I think few genealogists really consider this reality.
  3. In the period 1800-1850 many individuals moved from a Rhode Island farm to a nearby village with a mill. If we continue to look for them in the town where the family farm had been, we will miss a lot.

1820 Census of Manufactures

First, here is access to the 1820 Census of Manufactures.  Each surviving sheet is available on FamilySearch.org.  It is not particularly easy to use, so give yourself some time to adjust to what you’re seeing.

  • On FamilySearch.org, the link for the digitized 1820 census of manufactures. Look for the second entry on the page,
    “Schedules for Massachusetts and Rhode Island.” Massachusetts comes first on the images; Rhode Island starts on image 469 of 770.
  • A pdf Name Index of Rhode Island manufacturers – note that some names on here will refer to the Agricultural manufacturing lists submitted by some of the towns. The page number refers to the “page” or numbered form from the collection.
  • A pdf Summary Digest of the data for Rhode Island, divided by county and subdivided somewhat by industry shows some manufacturing data and shows the numbers of men, women and children employed.

Here is a typical census page: a report of the “Natick Turnpike Manufacturing Company” in Warwick, found on page 103. Note that these standard questions were used for all entries, although in some cases the form was copied into handwriting.

 

Next, let’s review those three points.

1820 Federal Census

Mills could be in any town since the requirement was an appropriate water source. They were sometimes in areas that would be considered rural and sometimes in large towns like Pawtucket and Providence. Because of the boom-and-bust nature of the early mills, owners may have retired to a life of obscurity after 1820.

To check out an ancestor’s source of income in 1820, consult the regular (population schedule) 1820 federal census. Each page actually is a two-page spread. Look for the following columns (image below) in between the Free White Females columns and the Slave columns. The columns report the number of persons in the household engaged in Agriculture, the number in Commerce, and the number in Agriculture.  While most farms had side businesses and specific skills being offered, most of that would be attributed to agriculture.  Seeing it attributed to manufactures shows you that the household was doing more than making sides of beef and wheels of cheese – maybe they were making shoes in the winter or, year-round, sending family members to a local mill for work or doing piecework within the house for goods needed at a nearby mill.

This snippet of information would not tell us what the particular line of work was, but that’s where the Census of Manufactures comes in.  You can look for the particular town to see if any businesses were reported.

Children worked in mills in 1820

Using the “Digest” pages, a quick calculation shows the following numbers of individuals employed statewide in manufacturing:

  • Men:  655
  • Women:  742
  • Boys & girls:  1381

I have searched in many places for a definition of “boys & girls.”  I find no surviving instructions for this section.  My guess, and it is really just a guess, is that a man was 18 or over.  A woman was 18 or over, and most likely not married since some listings referred to them as “young women” and some as “marriageable” women.  Which would mean a boy or girl was 17 or younger.  There’s always a possibility boy and girl meant 16 and under because many children worked from a very young age. If someone has better evidence about this I would love to have it here in the comments for readers to see.

Mostly, I think we need to get our heads around the fact that children from as early an age as possible worked, if not in official jobs then around their farms, or were “bound out” to work outside their family.  Public education in Rhode Island was not too bad in cities, but quite behind in more rural areas. There were numerous private schools around the state which obviously would never serve mill workers.

Most Rhode Island mill workers were living with their families, but some lived in boarding houses or with relatives because few people had transportation to a mill; they needed to live nearby. This became more true as time went by and the mill buildings got larger; the idea of placing “piecework” in households became less common, and reporting daily to the mill became more common.

The migration to mill villages

By 1820 the growing mill towns that attracted Rhode Islanders were Providence, Pawtucket, Warwick (especially the area that became West Warwick), Norwich, CT, and nearby Fall River (Troy) MA (which fell at various times in Rhode Island and Massachusetts). But almost any area could, and did, have mills. Check out your location of interest in the Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission guides to historic architecture and resources around the state. They provide village-by-village guidance and maps for the changing landscape of each town.

 

The bad news is, moving from farms to industrial jobs meant that property was, in many cases, no longer owned; our ancestors became renters. Industrial depressions and crises kept their incomes unstable. As a result, deeds and probate tend not to exist for the mill folks.

Genealogists should widen the scope of records searching to areas surrounding the town where their ancestors spent the 1700’s. To the extent possible, do statewide searches for vital records. Places of burial became more scattered as the families no longer owned the family farm, and would bury their loved ones in the new village where they resided. Newspapers might ignore those new to town. Note that the state census of 1865 reports a Rhode Island town of birth for each person enumerated.

In closing

I hope this census might prove helpful to those with early Rhode Island roots, and help them imagine the many changes faced by their ancestors in the early 1800’s.

Illustrations in this post are taken from Robert Grieve and John P. Ferland, The Cotton Centennial, 1790-1890 (Providence: Reid, 1891).

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Choosing a gift for a genealogist can be puzzling.  Loved ones and, especially, relatives want to be supportive but don’t know how.  To those who search for that perfect idea, maybe one below will be right for your favorite genealogists.  This is an update and consolidation of all previous lists.

Tools and gadgets

  • 1. If your favorite genealogists is interested in grave marker cleaning, D2 is a highly recommended product that’s a little inconvenient to get, so would make a thoughtful gift.  The D2 manufacturer has some suggestions for where to obtain it.
  • 2. Lifechat headphones for listening to webinars or group chats on the computer.
  • 3. Eneloop rechargeable batteries by Panasonic, size AA, with a charger and case, would be good for a person who already has a Flip-Pal.  Try Amazon or other retailers.  I also like AA batteries that re-charge in any USB port.  These would be great in a computer mouse, for travelers, in case the mouse batteries died.
  • 4. USB flash drives.  8gb or 16gb should be fine.  Look for sales. Genealogists need something large and bright so they remember to remove it from the computer.
  • 5. This tech gadget holder, pictured, from Staples is useful and holds a lot; I saw it in-store.

Tech case at Staples

Paper and stationery gifts

Colored Divider Sticky Notes Bundle Set. Another Midge Frazel find.

Lee Valley Portable Office

Brother Printer PT70BM Wireless Personal Handheld Labeler

Brother Printer PT70BM Wireless Personal Handheld Labeler

  • 10. Clip board. A clipboard, a pad, and a pencil can be brought into most archives, even if nothing else can, and a clipboard serves as a writing surface when at a microfilm machine or library. Try the thin printed ones at Staples but I also like this combination clipboard/mousepad.  Add a bouquet of Black Warrior Pencils topped off with a 3-pack of White Pearl Erasers.  I’m actually serious about this.  I know genealogists.
  • 11. Custom Genealogy Binders will be much appreciated by those who store research in paper binders.

Genealogy binders

Personalized Genealogy Binders; you have a family name printed on the spine. Perfect for those who store a lot of information on paper.

About photos and archives

  • 12. Maybe a simple Canon Camera in the $100-$150 range.  In the end, cheaper than paying for photocopies.   “Image stabilization” is an important feature for people who are photographing pages and documents.
  • 13. If your genealogist is not getting any younger, try magnifiers and magnifying lights.
  • 14. Camera digital SD memory cards.  And a little case to put them in, like this.
  • 15. For the genealogist who serves as the family archivist (which is all genealogists), my friend Bernadine had a good experience with photo supplies from universityproducts.com, for instance, their archival storage boxes. When she phoned them, they were helpful.  For modern sized photographs, these storage boxes are popular.
  • 16. I like this Canoscan scanner for pictures and papers, but you might be able to find a cheaper one that you like.
  • 17. I like my Flip-Pal mobile scanner – it runs on batteries and records onto a memory card – no computer needed until you are ready to review and store the pictures. Many genealogists really covet these.  Desirable accessories would be rechargeable batteries and a case.

Flip Pal mobile scanner

Flip Pal mobile scanner

  • 18. Family Photo Detective and many other works by Maureen Taylor help genealogists figure out those old family photos, and I also like Denise Levenick’s guide, How to Archive Family Photos: A Step-by-Step Guide to Organize and Share Your Photos Digitally.

Books and magazines

The Family Tree Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to Uncovering Your Ancestry and Researching Genealogy

Kenyatta Berry’s The Family Tree Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to Uncovering Your Ancestry and Researching Genealogy.

The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy by Blaine T. Bettinger

  • 22.  A reliable guide to those confusing DNA test results:  The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy by Blaine T. Bettinger. Also a moving book about the strange and unexpected news that DNA testing can bring: Stranger in My Genes by Bill Griffeth.
  • 23. From 2017, the newly updated The New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer, published by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.  This book is huge, and I mean huge.  But awesome for those troublesome New York problems.  Also check out “Research in the States” series from the National Genealogical Society for other states.
  • 24. How to Use Evernote for Genealogy: A Step-by-Step Guide to Organize Your Research and Boost Your Genealogy Productivity by Kerry Scott would be helpful for any genealogist who has mastered normal genealogy software but is looking to organize research and family history material “in the cloud.”
  • 25. Looking farther afield for those ancestors?  Try Genealogists’ Handbook for Irish Research by Marie E. Daly and The German Research Companion by Shirley Riemer, Roger Minert, & Jennifer Anderson.  My friend Sara points out that with so many Irish records newly online, this is a great time to get going on your Irish heritage.   Other suggestions include Finding Your Mexican Ancestors by George and Peggy Ryskamp and books by Sophie Hodorowicz Knab including Polish Customs, Traditions & Folklore.

The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. A new 4th Edition.

  • 26. There is a new Fourth Edition of the classic work by Val Greenwood, Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy.  What a great opportunity to learn about American records. 
  • 27. If your genealogist is surrounded by books, there are some bookends with index tabs that won’t get lost when the shelves fill up.  Actually, the Container Store has three styles I love:  Index bookends and Mod bookends.

Bookends from the Container Store

Bookends from the Container Store

  • 28. Genealogy Basics in 30 Minutes by Shannon Combs-Bennett is a new book that would help someone get started.  Genealogists enjoy reading Family Tree Magazine.  This is an especially good choice for beginners, and another recommendation for new to intermediate genealogists would be the book Family Tree Problem Solver by Marcia Hoffmann Rising.
  • 29.  Higginson Books is having a sale through December 31, 2018.  This would be a good place to get a modern reprint of an old town history or family genealogy book.
  • 30. Again for experienced folks, a membership in the National Genealogical Society will include a subscription to the Quarterly.
  • 31. I always thought Ancestors of American Presidents, Second Ed, 2009, by Gary Boyd Roberts, was a really fun book.  I’m only related to boring Presidents, though.
  • 32. For Hispanic roots, try this guide: Tracing your Ancestors: Hispanic Research: A Practical Guide by Gena Philbert Ortega, published 2018.
  • 33. I own and can heartily endorse these books by Christina Rose:
    • Genealogical Proof Standard: Building a Solid Case, 4th ed.
    • Military Bounty Land 1776-1855
    • Courthouse Research for Family Historians: Your Guide to Genealogical Treasures
    • Military Pension Acts: 1776 to 1858
  • 34. Books for those with New England ancestors from the New England Historic Genealogical Society:

 

I love the gavestone art from Gravestone Girls.

Support genealogy small businesses

  • 35. I love the work of the Gravestone Girls.  I have a refrigerator magnet and a small plaque.
  • 36. Lookup the historical society for an area your genealogist is researching and see what they offer – maps are always good.  Also, the local genealogy societies usually offer publications or guides.  For instance, the Rhode Island Genealogical Society has many valuable books and cemetery guides at their online store.
  • 37. The idea of heritage cookbooks was sent to me by Wendy Grant Walter.  She recently purchased Great German Recipes and said: “in it are many dishes that I remember having as a kid that I assume my mom learned from her 1st generation German mom.”  At that same link many other cultures are covered, too. Also, Sophie Hodorowicz Knab has a cookbook, The Polish Country Kitchen Cookbook.
    35. Barb’s Branches has some attractive tree jewelry in an Etsy shop.  Among her interesting handmade “tree” pieces, she has the inspired idea of making jewelry from old silver spoons.  Amazing!

A pendant made from an antique silver spoon, by Barb's Branches.

A pendant made from an antique silver spoon, by Barb’s Branches.

Make your own gift

  • 39. The family genealogist wears too many hats.  Family historian, archivist, photo restorer, report writer, researcher, local historian, cemetery rabbit.  A gift that would be appreciated is an effort to collect and produce a small book on one aspect of your family history.  Say, dad’s service in WW2, the relatives overseas from when you visited, or just everyone’s childhood.  My sister does this from time to time and it’s great.  No genealogy expertise needed, she asks me for pictures in advance, and the whole family gets a slice of its story without me having to do anything.
  • 40. A similar option would be to find, scan and print a copy of an old family photo, and frame it nicely – perhaps in an antique frame.
  • 41. Is your genealogist’s family associated with an old business or product? I saw on Elizabeth Handler’s blog From Maine to Kentucky that her ancestor produced a well known soap product, James Pyle’s Pearline, at the turn of the last century.  Her brother, knowing her interest, gave her a gift of an original box.  What a lovely memento.  An online search reveals many advertising cards and images for this product, some of them from the Library of Congress and in the public domain.  Such color images could be made into a cover for a blank book, calendar, or blank spiral notebook on lulu.com, or a custom deck of cards, or notecards, or just framed.

An old ad for a product that is part of a family’s history can be made into a custom gift. This image was from the Library of Congress online Photo, Print, Drawing Collection.

For Rhode Island genealogy

  • 42. There is finally a “Research in the States” book for Rhode Island, published by the National Genealogical Society in 2018, and Maureen Taylor and I are the authors.  I’m proud of this book, which will help researchers learn where Rhode Island records may be hiding, and why Rhode Island records are a little different than other states. The book can be purchased from NGS or from Family Roots Publishing.

Research in the States: Rhode Island by Maureen Taylor and Diane Boumenot, 2018.

  • 43. I heartily and strongly recommend the recent book Rhode Island in the American Revolution: A Source Guide for Genealogists and Historians by Eric G. Grundset for the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR Source Guides on the American Revolution Series No. 4), 2014. Quite a bargain at $25.  It is 200 pages of guidance on where to find Rhode Island records from the 1770’s and 1780’s, but it will not contain the records themselves – most of those are buried in archives and manuscripts.

Rhode Island in the American Revolution - A source Guide for Genealogists and Historians, by Eric G Grundset

Rhode Island in the American Revolution – A source Guide for Genealogists and Historians, by Eric G Grundset

  • 44. The most valuable book for those with ancestors in Rhode Island during the 1600’s is The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island by John O. Austin, published by Genealogical Publishing.  It charts the first three generations of many early Rhode Island families. You can sometimes find a cheaper used copy on eBay, but be sure to buy a version with additions and corrections from the 1960’s – 70’s.
  • 45. The Rhode Island Historical Society has a bookstore at the John Brown House, and online, offering my favorite print of Providence ever, President Street by Joseph Partridge, 1822. I also love Market Square.  Only $15 each.
  • 46. Spirit of 76 in Rhode Island by Benjamin Cowell for listings of R.I. Revolutionary War soldiers.
  • 47. Many Rhode Island history fans would love the book by Rhode Island post card collector Joseph E. Coduri, Rhode Island Towns & Villages: PostCard Views at the Turn of the 20th Century.

Rhode Island Towns and Villages

Trying something new

  • 49. For those new to DNA testing, and looking for an easy way to try it out, I could recommend an Ancestry DNA test kit.  Your genealogist will use the kit to submit a sample (in fact, it will be important to the genealogist to choose WHO will be sampled) which will be analyzed, and the results, available online, will show an estimate of ethnic origins and links to other individuals. A better choice for the same money, for a genealogist who is more experienced, is the Family Tree DNA Family Finder test kit.  Family Tree DNA gives enough information to more accurately allow you to estimate, if the right people are tested, the common source of your matches. Look for Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales.

Caution I brake for cemeteries

FREE FOR EVERYBODY:  My vintage Christmas gift tag sheets on Pinterest, ready for printing.

ALSO:  Check out Anne Wagner (of Rhode Island)’s PDF handout on GIFTS GENEALOGISTS MAY WANT TO GIVE.  I may try some of these!

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