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I guess I have always wanted to know about the places my ancestors lived.  But finding the spot for that family farm, as New England genealogists know, is never easy.  Rhode Island land doesn’t come packaged in neat square lots (ever).  With an almost 400 year history, buildings come and go.  Towns and borders are rearranged.  Deeds are kept in 39 locations around the state, and seldom online.

So we learn to be curious about maps, guides, historic landmarks, place names, and history.  While prior to genealogy I would only have been marginally interested in a guide to a town’s historic structures and neighborhoods, I have gradually become obsessed with these things.  If you want to solve a brick wall, one best practice is to learn as much as possible about the nearest locations you can find.

Fortunately, the Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission has produced, over the last several decades, guides to historic architecture and resources around the state.  Focusing town by town on buildings and other structures such as bridges, the guides present a history of the landscape and neighborhoods, some details of evolving land use and industries, guides to local historic houses, and, at the end of the volumes, impressive bibliographies of books and maps for further research.

There are even some local maps here and there, which help you to sort through the historic neighborhood names.  And, plenty of pictures of historic houses and buildings.

All of these volumes are now available through their website, as free downloads.  Although I own several volumes already, having instant access to ALL volumes is a huge step forward.  The pdf copies can be downloaded from the RIHPHC website here.

I can’t reproduce their materials here, of course, so visit their website to access the books.  This is the list of books available on the website:

  • Barrington
  • Block Island
  • Bristol
  • Burrillville
  • Central Falls
  • Charlestown
  • Coventry
  • Cranston – also: Pawtuxet Village
  • Cumberland
  • East Greenwich
  • East Providence
  • Exeter
  • Foster
  • Glocester
  • Hopkinton
  • Jamestown
  • Johnston
  • Lincoln
  • Little Compton
  • Middletown
  • Narragansett – also: Narragansett Pier
  • Newport–see:
    •   African-Americans of Newport
    •   Kay-Catherine-Old Beach Rd
    •   Southern Thames Street
    •   West Broadway
  • North Kingstown
  • North Providence
  • North Smithfield
  • Pawtucket
  • Portsmouth
  • Providence (Citywide) also:
    •   Downtown
    •   East Side
    •   Elmwood
    •   Providence Industrial Sites
    •   Smith Hill
    •   South Providence
    •   West Side
  • Richmond
  • Scituate
  • Smithfield
  • South Kingstown
  • Tiverton
  • Warren
  • Warwick – also: Pawtuxet Village
  • West Greenwich
  • West Warwick
  • Westerly
  • Woonsocket

RI Statewide–see:

  •   Historic Highway Bridges of RI
  •   Historic Landscapes of RI
  •   Native American Archaeology
  •   Outdoor Sculpture of RI
  •   RI Engineering/Industrial Sites
  •   RI: State-Owned Hist. Properties
  •   State Houses of RI

I think exploring these books at the RIHPHC website would be a great way to learn more about your ancestors’ neighborhood.  They would help you understand the landmarks mentioned in deeds, and to understand how the landscape changed over the centuries, and what the local industries were.

What a goldmine!  Hope they help you.

The post you are reading is located at:

http://onerhodeislandfamily.com/2017/03/30/a-sense-of-place

 

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I’ve decided to revisit a brick wall ancestor, my 4x-great grandmother, Lydia Minor, and to create, along the way, a complete guide to this journey.  I hope readers with their own Rhode Island brick walls will follow along, and perhaps choose one problem to explore on their own as this goes on. The problem originates in Rhode Island but then veers westward; something that many readers will identify with.

I’m not kidding when I say this will probably take years.  I chose this problem because it’s pretty hopeless.  Eight years has not solved it yet, so there is no low hanging fruit.  It should be/would be/could be solvable – the Minors of southeastern Connecticut are pretty well known – but this particular individual has eluded researchers up to now.  Lydia Minor is the great-grandmother of my mother’s grandfather, Russell Earl Darling.

The problem, if it is ever solved, will be solved by devising and implementing strategies, which will often involve seeking connections between small details that can be gleaned about Lydia and her known family.  So, let’s strategize.

I absolutely need an “X-RAYS BOX.” Right away.

The research question

It’s important to state, in writing, the question.  The question needs to narrow down the focus, but also to refer to specific people.

Who were the parents of Lydia Miner, who married Russell Lamphear in 1807 in Preston, Connecticut?

OK.  Now I know what I’m looking for.

Lydia Minor’s life

I’d like to begin by showing the little I know about who Lydia Minor really was, so that readers will begin to appreciate her as much as I do.

Direct Evidence

Her marriage:[1]

At Preston, Mr. RUSSELL LAMPHEAR, to Miss Lydia Miner.

Evaluation

  • The marriage was recorded in a Norwich, Connecticut newspaper as happening in Preston (Connecticut), the town immediately east of Norwich.  When I review facts on the husband, Russell, it will be clear that he was living in Norwich at this time, having recently moved from Westerly, Rhode Island.
  • With few Minors in Preston, no clues have surfaced to connect Lydia or Russell to Preston.  But embarrassingly, I now realize that although I have consulted The Barbour Collection of Connecticut Town Records, Preston 1687-1850, Parts 1 & 2, some New London County probate districts via microfilm at the NEHGS library in Boston, and some Preston deeds at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, I have never been to Preston Town Hall. And there’s nothing like going to the town hall.  Well, that’s why we’re doing this!  Adding it to the list.
  • “Miss” Lydia Miner is an indication this is a first marriage.  Based on her age (from her death record, coming up) of about 20 or 21, that was very likely anyway.

Lydia’s newspaper death notice clipping was something I ordered from the New London County Historical Society[3]:

The scanty 23 January 1849 death notice for Lydia at least gives an age, 62.

Evaluation

  • The notice, in a Norwich, Connecticut newspaper, specifies that the death occurred at “Norwich Falls.”  The Falls is a neighborhood that became industrialized thanks to water power in the very early 1800’s, and (as will be reviewed in the future) evidence points to Russell and Lydia spending many years there.
  • Lydia died on 18 January, 1849, still married to her husband Russell.  Her age in January, 1849 of 62 years suggests a birth year of 1787 or, even more likely, 1786.  Russell certainly knew how old she was, but who the source of this information was, and whether it was reported directly to the paper for insertion or copied from some town record, is unknown.  No death record was found on three separate searches in the Norwich Town Hall or in the printed two volume set, Vital records of Norwich, 1659-1848. Also none was found at the Connecticut State Archives in Hartford.
  • Western papers please copy is a good indication that Lydia had loved ones west of Connecticut.  Although only one son and one daughter are specifically known to have headed west, this is something to keep in mind as the children are explored.

Indirect Evidence

Here are some thoughts about her as shared by her son William in his old age as he was reminiscing to a reporter, along with an old friend (this clipping was sent to me by a very kind researcher on a related line who noticed Russell Lamphere on my blog)[2]:

I think for a woman who married in 1807 and had 14 children, being remembered in this manner by a loving son 50 years after her death is very sweet.

The story, further, tells us that Lydia and Russell Lamphere had 14 children; seven boys and seven girls:

Note that the “genial old gentleman, fond of stories” was Lydia’s son William Lamphere, and the rest of the paragraph refers to Lydia’s husband, Russell Lamphere.

Evaluation:

  • Lydia and Russell not only had 14 children, but seven were girls and seven were boys.
  • Lydia did all her own housework (I do know that several of the oldest children were girls, which was probably a help) and met “the demands of society” which I take to mean she led a normal life and interacted with her community.
  • The Lampheres were Methodists.  Good to know.
  • The clue about the children living long lives is barely true, as a child-by-child examination will show, but clearly some of them did.

Research plan (just the beginning of the plan, I will keep adding):

  • Visit Preston Town Hall to seek birth and marriage records for Lydia, and take a careful look at ALL Minor records in the deeds and probate (although Connecticut separates probates into “districts” I notice the towns often have older materials on hand).
  • Review Thomas Minor Descendants 1608-1981 by John Augustus Minor to build a list of all the Lydia Minors that are not the right one.  I’ve done this before, but I think I’ll start fresh.  Also, in that book, explore Minors who were ever resident in Preston.
  • Review historical background materials on Norwich and Preston.
  • Investigate Methodists churches in Norwich Falls in the first half of the 1800’s.
  • Carefully review available record sets for Norwich and Preston on Ancestry.com, AmericanAncestors.org, and FamilySearch.org, as well as any Revolutionary War records on Fold3 for Minors/Miners from Preston.  I haven’t reviewed web resources on this for a while, and it changes quickly.
  • Consider a visit to the New London County Historical Society in New London, after the review is well underway and the research plan is more fully developed.

While I don’t have a picture of Lydia of course, this photograph is of her daughter, Lucy Ann (Lamphere) Cook, 1808-1865. From the collection of L. Buck, used with permission.

Next:  Starting from the beginning, I’ll review the early life and residences of Lydia’s husband Russell, trying to determine where he met Lydia.

Footnotes

[1] “Married,” The Courier (Norwich, Conn.), 20 May 1807, p. 3, col. 3; image copy, GenealogyBank.com, (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 18 June 2011).

[2] “Letters from the People : Old Times and Old Folks,” Norwich (Connecticut) Bulletin, 12 September 1898, p. [unknown], col. 3.

[3] “DIED,” Norwich (Connecticut) Evening Courier, 23 January 1849, vol. VII, no. 141, whole num. 541, p. 3, col. 1.

The post you are reading is located at: http://onerhodeislandfamily.com/2017/03/12/brick-wall-journey-part-1/

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Recently, the Providence Public Library received the archival collections of noted Rhode Island genealogist James Newell Arnold (1844-1927) from the Knight Memorial Library in Providence, which had housed the papers since James Arnold’s death in 1927. The James N. Arnold Collection is now part of The Rhode Island Collection.

Providence Public Library. Always be sure to take a good look around; it's a lovely old place.

Stairwell, Providence Public Library. Always be sure to take a good look around; it’s a lovely old place.  Photo by Diane Boumenot.

Kate Wells of the Providence Public Library had clued me in to this last winter and recently let me know that the materials were now newly processed into an archival collection and were, essentially, open for business.  It’s not completely trivial to access the collection (for instance, the boxes are stored on another floor from the Rhode Island Collection office and reading room), so I made an appointment with Kate for my visit.

Here is the Finding Aid for the collection (it opens up as a pdf download).

James Newell Arnold as a young man. I love this picture, he's quite a handsome young man. Hard to imagine he was already suffering from the affliction that was noticeable later in life, something that caused him to rely on crutches. Whatever the affliction was, could it have started later?

James Newell Arnold as a young man. I love this picture, he’s quite a handsome young man. Was he already suffering from the affliction that was noticeable later in life, something that caused him to rely on crutches?  3-59, “Photographs, James N. Arnold”, James N. Arnold Collection, Rhode Island Collection, Providence Public Library.

In the course of a long life James N. Arnold followed his historical data collection interests with a passion.  Although the Narragansett Historical Register, his gravestone recordings, and the Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850 were his most visible projects, he spent a lifetime studying historical claims and events, arguing and sometimes feuding with other historians (most notably, a long standing feud with the Rhode Island Historical Society), collecting books, stories and ephemera, and never missing an opportunity to disparage Roger Williams.

One of the two card catalogs containing various indices to parts of the collection.

One of the two card catalogs containing various indices to parts of the collection.

I carefully studied the Finding Aid (see above) in advance and decided to focus on the records of the Arnold family.  James Arnold never produced the formal Arnold genealogy volume that he, no doubt, planned to finish someday, although late in life he seems to have collaborated a bit with other Arnold researchers who did produce manuscripts or books (more on published works here).   It was clear from my perusal that my particular problem has not been solved; time for me to figure it out myself.  But I was grateful for a chance to check that out.

These colorful gravestone collection index cards were, I think compiled after James Arnold's death by volunteers.

These colorful gravestone collection index cards were, I think, compiled after James Arnold’s death, by volunteers.

Kate Wells advised me that, with the vital records and gravestone work widely available elsewhere, the most likely source for some genealogy magic was one of the card catalogs that had accompanied the manuscripts, plus a set of genealogy correspondence folders that contained many inquiries, answers, and notes.  I attacked the card catalogs with a pre-determined list and didn’t turn up much. The only work of James Arnold that seemed to intersect significantly with my needs were some early Smithfield/Cumberland families.  But I would like to return and approach this again with more time to peruse the many letters on file.

Arnold's weather diaries, kept for many years, plus some farm accounts. Box 4,

Arnold’s weather diaries, kept for many years, plus some farm accounts. Box 4, “Weather journals”, James N. Arnold Collection, Rhode Island Collection, Providence Public Library.

The documents are ordered and filed in boxes.  Genealogy notes on many Rhode Island families, tombstone recordings, Arnold family notes, historical as well as fictional stories, clippings, correspondence, account books, annals of war — there are many possibilities for research here.

You just don't know what you're going to find among the many boxes and folders.

You just don’t know what you’re going to find among the many boxes and folders.

I enjoyed my journey into James Arnold’s world and intend to keep studying his work. I was thrilled to find the original newspaper clippings of Harriet James’ work on my Andrews family.  The genealogy work on Rhode Island families was a hodge podge of copied notes, essays, clippings and abstracts, but was definitely unique and valuable.  I will revisit those.

James Arnold, in early middle age perhaps, looking speculative and a little untidy. The well-known poverty of his later years may well have factored into all stages of his life.

James Arnold, in early middle age perhaps, looking speculative and a little untidy. The well-known poverty of his later years may well have factored into many stages of his life.  3-59, “Photographs, James N. Arnold”, James N. Arnold Collection, Rhode Island Collection, Providence Public Library.

A folder of photographs of James Arnold claimed my attention.  Never married, physically impaired,  determined, opinionated to a fault, Arnold was — from what little I know of him — incapable of the fawning demeanor of service that might have made him more valued and protected by Rhode Island’s wealthier classes, who relied on his work.

This fascinating photo shows Arnold leaning on the crutches that were his companion during, at least, his later life. One gets a cemetery feel from the picture but it could be a noted historical spot. 3-59,

This fascinating photo shows Arnold leaning on the crutches that were his companion during, at least, his later life. One gets an overgrown cemetery feel from the picture but it could be an ancient historical spot. 3-59, “Photographs, James N. Arnold”, James N. Arnold Collection, Rhode Island Collection, Providence Public Library.

As time went on, James Arnold found that his life’s work, including his two major publishing ventures, had not ensured a comfortable old age.  Late in life he was basically destitute, dependent on Providence’s Dexter Asylum.

Well into middle age, Arnold was sometimes photographed with his crutches. 3-59,

Well into middle age.  Note his possibly disfigured foot.  3-59, “Photographs, James N. Arnold”, James N. Arnold Collection, Rhode Island Collection, Providence Public Library.

A set of documents relating to James Arnold’s death make it clear that he tried, as an old man, to dispose of his massive collection of poorly arranged papers.  Several important repositories corresponded with him and would have been happy to take them. The choicest books might perhaps have been sold during his life but many books  as well as the papers were eventually donated to the library in Elmwood, Providence, that eventually became the Knight Memorial Library.  The books, according to Kate, were eventually dispersed among Providence’s library system.

James Arnold in 1925, two years before his death. 3-59,

James Arnold in 1925, two years before his death. 3-59, “Photographs, James N. Arnold”, James N. Arnold Collection, Rhode Island Collection, Providence Public Library.

No one’s work is perfect but it’s notable that no person, in the hundred years since his Vital Record of Rhode Island volumes were published, has systematically re-checked his work in its entirety.  No one has been willing to take on the project that he did, and so we all owe this man a great deal of gratitude for a lifetime spent saving our history.

The post you are reading is located at:

http://onerhodeislandfamily.com/2016/11/18/the-james-n-arnold-collection/

James Arnold, looking somewhat business-like, probably at the heyday of his publishing career. 3-59,

James Arnold, looking somewhat business-like, probably at the heyday of his publishing career. 3-59, “Photographs, James N. Arnold”, James N. Arnold Collection, Rhode Island Collection, Providence Public Library.

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It’s easy to record a practice run of your Powerpoint presentation, complete with audio, and watch it on your computer.  It’s a great way to prepare for a speaking engagement.  I used Powerpoint for years before I discovered this easy utility; nothing in Powerpoint makes it obvious.

The only thing you’ll need is your prepared Powerpoint presentation and a headset. I am using a PC and Office 2016.

Microsoft Lifechat headphones plug into a USB port on your computer

Microsoft Lifechat headphones plug into a USB port on your computer

Step 1  Create a copy of your presentation

This process will add an audio file to each of your slides.  That will greatly increase the size of the file, by 500-600%.  So start by making an extra “practice recording” copy of your presentation, and working with that.  You can discard it later. That way you don’t increase the size of your final document.

2016-11-06-14_03_13-4-brick-walls-bessie-version

Step 2  Fix your settings

Open the new copy of your finished presentation.  Go to the Slide Show tab.  “Play Narrations” and “Use Timings” should be checkmarked.  Put on your headphones and plug them into the computer.

2016-11-06-14_14_38-4-brick-walls-and-how-they-were-solved-b-powerpoint

 

Step 3  Start recording

Use “Record Slide Show” —  sub-choice: “Record from beginning.”  This brings up the recording screen.  There is a large RED BUTTON in the upper corner – clicking that starts the recording session.  Then, speaking into your headset microphone, make your presentation while clicking through the slides.  Both the sound and the timing will all be recorded.  My presentation takes about an hour; the timing showed during recording so I could pace myself.

TIP: Sound is only recorded slide-by slide.  So don’t speak during the slide transitions.

I noticed while doing it that I wasn’t allowed to click backwards at all, only progress forward through the slides.  During the taping, the red button turned into a button that could be used to stop or pause.

2016-11-06-16_03_19-4-bw-practice-recording-powerpoint-presenter-view

When you click past the final slide, a message will appear saying to click to end the presentation.  Clicking anything at that point ends it.  The screen goes back to normal.

Step 4  Review your presentation

Now, back in the normal editing view of your powerpoint slides, you will notice that each slide has a gray audio icon in the lower corner.

2016-11-06-16_15_22-4-bw-practice-recording-powerpoint

At this point, seeing the audio icons reassures you that the sound was recorded.

If for any reason you ever want to remove the audio from that slide, just click the icon, delete it, and the sound is deleted.  Or, your voice (“narrations”) could be deleted under the Slide Show tab, using “Record Slide Show” — “Clear” — “Clear narrations …”

If you stopped completely mid-way through, it’s also possible to re-launch your recording by going to the slide where you want to keep going, and selecting Record Slide Show and “Record from Current Slide.”  In my experience, the most recent taping of the slideshow is saved.

Step 5  Play your recorded presentation

To play your recorded presentation, go to the Slide Show tab again.  Click “From Beginning.”

This brings up the presentation and begins to play it.  You can either listen on your headphones, or unplug them and the sound should come directly from the computer.

Step 6  If you want to save or share your video

If all you want to do is review your own presentation, you’re done.  If you want to share your recorded video, and don’t want to share it as a Powerpoint file, then you can save it as an WMV or MP4 file.  I’m still testing that out.

Good luck with recording your video!

The post you are reading is located at:

http://onerhodeislandfamily.com/2016/11/06/watch-a-practice-run-of-your-powerpoint-presentation

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Working With A Strategy

It’s easy to get caught in a cycle of web searches or casual queries that produce spotty and confusing results, or no results at all.  Once we realize that the answer to our difficult family history question won’t come that way, it frees us up to consider the alternative sources that may provide evidence, strategies to get around unrecorded events, and a plan for research that, if nothing else, will guarantee greater expertise in the era, the place, and the available resources.

Research question

My question comes from an East Greenwich deed of my 4x-great grandparents, Jesse and Sarah (Arnold) Andrews. I am related to them in the following way:  my grandmother Edna May Darling – her father Russell E Darling – his mother Emma L Lamphere – her mother Hannah Andrews, daughter of Jesse and Sarah.

How and why were Jesse and Sarah, in 1800, the owners of a property worth $900?  Subsequently, they seemed to be poor; living in Warwick near her family and moving on to Connecticut where they owned only a small property with a significant mortgage.  The kind of records that suggest money – probate, gravestones, church pews, business licenses, town appointments, recording vital records, and newspaper mentions – don’t seem to exist for Jesse Andrews.  Did he start out well off?

Abstract of the deed

Andrews to Spencer, Warranty Deed
East Greenwich, Kent County, Rhode Island
Land Evidence 10:527
Drawn 26 Feb 1800, recorded 26 Feb 1800
JESSE ANDREWS of East Greenwich “Yeoman alias Mariner” for nine hundred dollars paid by Captain JOSEPH SPENCER of East Greenwich, Mariner, “have sold a lot of land with a dwelling house and other buildings” located in East Greenwich, described as:
“Containing by Estimation about twenty seven Square Rods be the same more or Less and bounded as followeth. East on the Main Street or Post Road, South Part on Land of STEPHEN GREEN JOHN CASEY and CLARK BROWN, West on a Lot of Land belonging to the Heirs of OLIVER ARNOLD Late Deceased and North on a Street or Highway. “
“I the said JESSE ANDREWS do Promise” that
“I am the true sole & Lawful owner of the above bargained premises and Lawfully seized & Possessed of the same in my own Proper Right as a good Perfect and absolute Estate of inheritance in fee simple[.]”
Dower release by SARAH ANDREWS, wife of JESSE ANDREWS. 26 February A.D. 1800. [signed] JESSE ANDREWS (seal), SARAH ANDREWS (+) “her mark” (seal). Witnesses: DAN TAYLOR, ANDREW BOYD.
Recorded February 26th AD 1800; JESSE and SARAH ANDREWS personally appeared in East Greenwich.

Analysis of current deed (see full transcription at bottom of this post)

Jesse Andrews was a “Yeoman Alias Mariner” in this deed; from prior research I know he had a Seaman’s Protection Certificate from Providence and was documented on at least one voyage in 1794. So apparently he was transitioning to a Yeoman.  And yet, he owns only 27 square rods of land  – less than ¼ acre.  Clearly he would do very little farming or animal husbandry there.

The sale price of $900 seems extraordinary.  There is no mention of a mortgage in any way, nor do other deeds suggest that.  From all later accounts the family seems poor. Were their earlier fortunes much better?  Jesse’s father died in the late 1780’s, when Jesse was a teenager, leaving no surviving probate record.  Only two sons are documented as surviving him; the other moved to Rensselaer County, New York and did well.  Did Jesse start life with a reasonable inheritance?

“Main Street or Post Road” is the same street then as today; the main street of downtown East Greenwich, a thriving community with the Bay to the East with a small port, quickly turning (at this earlier period) to farmland on the west side.  Through previous research I know Jesse’s property, from this deed, was located at the corner of Main and Montrose Streets.

This map of 1820 East Greenwich is provided as evidence that King Street, leading down to the bay, was the main thoroughfare of East Greenwich, not Main Street, where my ancestor had a house. That goes a long way to explain how my ancestor could afford such a classy address - maybe it wasn't - from The History of East Greenwich by McPartland, p. 51.

This map of 1820 East Greenwich is provided as evidence that King Street, leading down to the bay, was the main thoroughfare of East Greenwich, not Main Street, where Jesse Andrews’ house was. – from The History of East Greenwich by McPartland, p. 51.

Sarah cannot write her name, but being female this doesn’t provide much evidence of financial standing of her family.  Jesse can write, which suggests, at least, a financially stable childhood.

One abutter was Oliver Arnold.  Sarah Andrews’ maiden name was Arnold and her father was Joseph.  Was Oliver related to her?

The house was sold in February; by mid-year Jesse was enumerated in nearby Warwick between his mother and his father in law (and again in 1810).  Depending on the exact location, that could be just a few blocks away.  With money in hand, it’s hard to imagine why the couple retreated to their parents’ neighborhood and did not appear to own property again for the next two decades.

Witness “Dan Taylor” is related to the Campbell family, previous owners of this property and relatives of a noted local genealogist.  Further evidence from that quarter should turn up the exact location and history of this property.

Research plan

1. Look at other deeds for Jesse Andrews, in particular, the documents that explain his acquisition of this property. Look at the surrounding towns to find ALL property records for Jesse’s father, Philip Andrews, and investigate through deeds and probate exactly what Philip inherited from his own father.

  • Deeds (use grantor and grantee index volumes) for Jesse Andrews, Philip Andrews, and John Andrews in Warwick, East Greenwich, and Coventry, R.I.
  • Check for early Mortgage records which may be filed separately in East Greenwich.
  • Probate for Jesse’s grandfather John Andrews in East Greenwich or Warwick.

2. Determine the meaning of Yeoman beyond just farming; also, Warranty Deed.

  • Blacks Law Dictionary
  • Researchers Guide to American Genealogy
  • East Greenwich and Warwick deeds in my possession

3. Look for tax records in East Greenwich.

  • Inquire at the East Greenwich town clerk’s office about the federal 1798 Direct Tax, to verify that the East Greenwich list is lost.
  • Also ask if any other tax records survive from 1795-1801.
Bruce McGunnigle's recent guide to historic East Greenwich is helpful for pinning down locations of property. The East Greenwich Free Library provides additional manuscript materials.

Bruce McGunnigle’s recent guide to historic East Greenwich is helpful for pinning down locations of property. The East Greenwich Free Library provides additional manuscript materials.

4. Investigate the neighbor Oliver Arnold.

  • Greene, D.H. History of the Town of East Greenwich and Adjacent Territory (Providence, 1877).
  • Adamson, Thaire H. and Marion Fry.  A History of East Greenwich Rhode Island : as published in The East Greenwich Packet.  East Greenwich, R.I. : East Greenwich Preservation Society, 1996.
  • Use East Greenwich deeds to determine who the previous owner of Oliver’s property was.
  • The Arnold Memorial by Elisha Arnold
  • If necessary: James Arnold’s Vital Record of Rhode Island, vol. 1
  • If necessary: Search Rhode Island Roots at americanancestors.org.

5. Determine the value of $900 in 1800; was currency in fluctuation; was it controlled by the federal government or the state at that time.

  • Find a journal article or book that explains currency fluctuations 1790-1810.

6. Examine the three abutters – Stephen Green, John Casey, and Clark Brown – listed on the deed, to seek relatives for Sarah.

  • Greene, D.H. History of the Town of East Greenwich and Adjacent Territory (Providence, 1877).
  • McPartland, Martha R.  The History of East Greenwich, Rhode Island 1677-1960 With Related Genealogies (East Greenwich Free Library Association, 1960).
  • Casey Family of Casey Farm, vertical file at Rhode Island Historical Society.
  • The Brown Family History II: Tracing the Clark Brown Line by Spooner, Platz and Young, at R.I. Historical Society Library.
  • The Clarke Family of Rhode Island by George Austin Morrison available online at http://digital.library.yale.edu/cdm/ref/collection/rebooks/id/101779
  • Bamberg, Cherry Fletcher. “Gleanings from Rhode Island Town Records: East Greenwich Town Council Records, 1734-1774.” Rhode Island Roots. Special Bonus Issue 2008 (April 2008).
  • Bamberg, Cherry Fletcher. “Gleanings from Rhode Island Town Records: East Greenwich Town Council Records, 1775-1800.” Rhode Island Roots. Special Bonus Issue 2009 (April 2009).
  • James Arnold’s Vital Record of Rhode Island, vol. 1
  • Search Rhode Island Roots at americanancestors.org.

7. Study the backgrounds of the witnesses, Dan Taylor and Andrew Boyd, especially in light of Dan Taylor’s appearance in prior deeds.

  • MacGunnigle, Bruce Campbell. “Archibald Campbell Esq.: Ancestors and Descendants; Part One.”  Rhode Island Roots, 32:1 (Mar 2006) 1-22.
  • Adamson, Thaire H. “The Campbell Chronicle” in A History of East Greenwich, Rhode Island, Second Printing (East Greenwich, R.I. Preservation Society, 1996) 116-117.

8. Learn more about the purchaser, Joseph Spencer. What were his subsequent activities on the property? Do they suggest some type of outfitting or location specifics that could reveal something about the uses Jesse and Sarah had for the house?  Look in local journals, newspapers, and, if necessary, probate.

  • McPartland, Martha R.  The History of East Greenwich, Rhode Island 1677-1960 With Related Genealogies (East Greenwich Free Library Association, 1960).
  • Greene, D.H. History of the Town of East Greenwich and Adjacent Territory (Providence, 1877).
  • MacGunnigle, Bruce C. Strolling in Historic East Greenwich. Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014.

In closing

Working on a strategy is time well spent.  A written research strategy can be taken to repositories, and amended as new evidence comes up.  Notes and footnotes can be taken adjacent to the items on the list, forming a quick research report, ready for analysis.

More on the outcomes of this research later.

Signature of Jesse and Sarah Andrews on the deed. He signed, she made her mark.

Signature of Jesse and Sarah Andrews on the deed. He signed, she made her mark.

———-

Transcription of deed

Andrews to Spencer, Warranty Deed
East Greenwich, Kent County, Rhode Island
Land Evidence 10:527
Drawn 26 Feb 1800, recorded 26 Feb 1800
To all People to whom these Presents shall Come, I Jesse Andrews of East Greenwich in the County of Kent and State of Rhode Island Yeoman alias Mariner send Greeting. Know ye that I the said Jesse Andrews for and in Consideration of the sum of Nine Hundred Dollars to me in Hand before the Ensealing thereof, well and Truly Paid by Capt. Joseph Spencer of said East Greenwich in said County of Kent Mariner, the Receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge and myself therewith fully satisfied Contented and Paid, and thereof and of every Part and Parcel thereof do exonerate acquit and discharge him the said Joseph Spencer his heirs Executors and Administrators, forever by these Presents Have Given, granted, bargained sold assined, enfeoffed Conveyed and Confirmed, and by these Presents do freely, fully and absolutely Give, Grant bargain sell assine enfeoffe Convey and Confirm unto him the said Joseph Spencer his heirs and assigns forever a Certain Lot of Land With a Dwelling House & other Buildings thereon standing situate in East Greenwich aforesaid said Lot Containing by Estimation about Twenty seven square Rods be the same more or Less and bounded as followeth. East on the Main Street or Post Road, South Part on Land of Stephen Green John Casey and Clark Brown, West on a Lot of Land belonging to the Heirs of Oliver Arnold Late Deceased and North on a Street or Highway. To Have and to Hold the said Granted and bargained Premises, with all the appurtenances, Privilidges & Commodeties to the same belonging or in anywise appertaining to him the said Joseph Spencer his heirs & assigns forever to his and their only proper use benefit and behalf forever, and I the said Jesse Andrews for myself my heirs Executors & Administrators do Covenant Promise and Grant to & with the said Joseph Spencer his heirs and assigns that at and before the Ensealing hereof I am the true sole & Lawful owner of the above bargained premises and Lawfully seized & Possessed of the same in my own Proper Right as a good Perfect and absolute Estate of inheritance in fee simple & have in my self Good Right full Power and Lawfull Authority to Grant bargain Sell Convey and Confirm the said bargained Premises in Manner as aforesaid and that the said Joseph Spencer his heirs & assigns shall and may from time to time and at all times forever hereafter by force and Virtue of these Presents Lawfully Peaceably and Justly Have hold and[?] occupy Possess and Enjoy the said devised & bargained Premises with the appurtinances freely and Clearly acquitted Exonerated and discharged of and from all & all Manner of former or other Gifts Grants bargains Sales Leases Mortgages Wills Entails Jointures Dowries Judgments Executions & incumbrances of what Name or Nature soever[?] that might in any Measure or Dagne [?] or make void the Present Deed. Furthermore I the said Jesse Andrews for me my heirs Executors & Administrators do Covenant & Engage the above devised Premises to him the said Joseph Spencer his heirs & assigns against the lawful
Claims or demands of any Person or Persons whatsoever, forever to Warrant Secure and Defend by these Presents & Sarah Andrews Wife of the said Jesse Andrews for the Consideration above Mentioned doth Yield up and surrender unto the before mentioned Joseph Spencer his heirs & assigns forever all her Right of Dower & Power of thirds in & unto the before described Lot of Land & Premises. In Witness whereof we the said Jesse Andrews and Sarah Andrews have hereunto set our Hand and Seal this Twenty Sixth Day of February Anno Domi 1800 — —
Jesse Andrews (seal)
her
Sarah + Andrews (seal)
Mark
Signed Sealed & Delivered in Presence of
Dan Taylor
Andrew Boyd
Recorded & Compd with the original February 26th AD 1800 by
H. Cooke,Tn Clk
Kent / East Greenwich the day & year above Mentioned Personally appeared the above subscribers Jesse Andrews & Sarah Andrews & acknowledged the above Deed of sale to be their voluntary act & Deed hand and seal thereunto affixed before me
A. Boyd Just. Peace —

——–

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Who Were the Parents of Hannah (Andrews) Lamphere?

Hannah Andrews and Russell Lamphere married on 11 June 1838 at Norwich, Connecticut and over the next 40 years until her death in 1878 they lived their lives and raised their children in Connecticut, Alabama, and Rhode Island, leaving behind enough records to make the details of her adult life reasonably clear.  The question is, who were the parents of Hannah Andrews?

There are documents that reveal the names of Hannah’s parents to be Jesse and Sarah Andrews.  Knowing exactly which Jesse and Sarah Andrews is problematic.  Neither Hannah nor her parents lived out their lives in one place, and their vital records are spotty.  Many records left by wealthier families – vital records, numerous land transactions, church pews, probate records, informative cemetery markers – were seemingly out of reach for Hannah’s family.  And of the evidence that does exist, some is contradictory.

Using a combination of direct evidence and evidence gleaned through identifying two siblings, proof that Hannah’s parents were the Jesse and Sarah Andrews married in Warwick, Rhode Island in 1795 can be pieced together.

Map showing the important locations in Hannah's lifetime.

Map showing the important locations in Hannah’s lifetime.

Jessie and Sarah Andrews

Hannah’s death record contains the names of her parents: Jesse Andrews and Sarah Andrews.  It also reports that Sarah Andrews was born in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Hannah’s 1878 death record, signed by her doctor with data reported by her husband, exists as both a “Return of Death” and as the same information copied into the Providence record book of Deaths.[1]  It is the most direct report of Hannah’s parents found.  Jesse’s birthplace is given as “U.S.” and Sarah’s as “Warwick” which would mean Warwick, Rhode Island since the form was from Providence, Rhode Island.  Hannah’s birthplace is listed as “Coventry, Connecticut,” and her birth date calculates to 12 February 1819.  Since Russell and Hannah married when Hannah was 19, her family situation prior to marriage should have been well known to him.

Research shows two sets of Jesse and Sarah Andrews in New England, although of course there could be others:

  1. Jesse Andrews and Sarah Alvord married at Montague, Franklin County, Massachusetts (intentions, 18 Dec 1817[2]) and became the parents of three living children (Nancy Eliza, Sophia Lucretia, and Moses) between January, 1819 and October, 1822[3]. There would not have been time for the birth of Hannah and another sibling (Alden, see below) during the period 1817-1822.  There is no evidence that this couple ever left Massachusetts.
  2. Jesse Andrews, of Philip, and Sally Arnold, of Joseph, married at Warwick, Rhode Island on 22 February 1795.[4] The town, Warwick, coincides with information on Hannah’s death record. If Sarah Arnold had been 18 at marriage, in that case, she could have been about 42 in 1819, the probable year of Hannah’s birth.  Given that there were many children reported in the federal census records of 1800[5] and 1810[6] for this couple, a child as late as age 42 seems possible. No record has been found in Rhode Island for this couple after the 1810 census.

More evidence is needed to build a case for Jesse and Sally Andrews of Warwick to be Hannah’s parents, because they did not remain in Warwick.  From here, it is necessary to backtrack through Hannah’s adult life to find the additional clues.

Hannah’s marriage

Norwich Town 11 June 1838 Russell Lamphere of Norwich and Hannah Andrews of Ashford entered in the marriage relation before me . Joel R. Arnold, Pastor of the Congl Church Colchester. Received July 5, 1878. Simeon [?] Town Clerk

Norwich Town 11 June 1838

The first clue is that Hannah was, in 1838, from Ashford, Connecticut.  The marriage of Hannah Andrews and Russell Lamphere appears in the town records of Norwich, Connecticut:

Norwich Town 11 June 1838 Russell Lamphere of Norwich and Hannah Andrews of Ashford entered in the marriage relation before me   Joel R Arnold   Pastor of Cong’l Church   Colchester   Received July 5 1838 Simeon Thomas Town Clerk. [7]

The handwritten record, a primary source, provides direct evidence of the marriage and was viewed in the original book where it was recorded several weeks later by the town clerk, as reported by the officiant.  It is less clear why Hannah was not married in her own town of Ashford, and why they chose a minister from another town five miles distant.

Newlyweds Hannah and Russell were enumerated in Norwich, Connecticut in 1840 with one boy under 5 and with three extra adults in the household, besides the young couple[8].

Hannah’s brother

Although birth and death records are non-existent for this family before the 1870’s, during Hannah’s marriage and even after her death, there is evidence of a brother, Alden Andrews, who was the son of the Jesse Andrews of Ashford.  Alden can very reasonably be called Hannah’s brother because of four circumstances:  co-habitation, similar age and birthplace, parental names on the death records, and assistance given to Alden’s children.

Alden is enumerated in the same Norwich, Connecticut dwelling with Hannah and Russell Lamphere in 1850.

1850 NORWICH, CONN.  Dwelling 1939[9] Name Age Sex Occup Birthplace Attended school
Family 2432 Russell Lamphere 32 M Machinist Conn.
Hannah  “ 31 F Mass.
William “ 10 M Conn. 1
Sarah  “ 7 F Conn. 1
Charles  “ 5 M
Caroline  “ 2 F
Family 2433 Alden Andrews 31 M Machinist Mass.
Sarah  “ 26 F Mass.
Albert  “ 1 M Conn.
Louisa Tucker 18 F Mass.

 

This census shows Alden Andrews living in the same dwelling as Hannah and Russell and their children, along with Alden’s family.  Alden and Russell were working as machinists.  For them to live in the same dwelling provides strong evidence that they were family.  The lack of a difference in their ages seems inconsistent with other records, that usually maintain an earlier birth year for Alden.  The birthplace for both, Massachusetts, might point to other Jesse and Sarah Andrews family, from Montague, Massachusetts as parents, but in fact the period of their birth, the late 1810’s, is one in which the Jesse and Sarah Andrews of Warwick had disappeared from Warwick records, and not yet made their appearance in Ashford records, so they could have been in Massachusetts.  Or the designation of Massachusetts could be wrong.  Despite a report in her death record that Coventry, Connecticut was her birthplace, no evidence has ever turned up to clarify the birthplace question for Hannah or Alden.

Alden later lived in Rhode Island, appearing with his wife and children in the 1870 census[10] (and providing evidence that he had a son Merrill) and dying in Coventry, Rhode Island in 1873[11], leading to the second piece of evidence that Alden was Hannah’s brother:  his father was listed on his death certificate as “Jesse”; mother left blank.

The third and final piece of evidence, a census record from 1880[12], after Hannah’s death, shows that Russell Lamphere was living in Providence, Rhode Island and had taken in Alden’s son Merrill Andrews as a boarder. Both men were employed at a “Cotton Mill” which suggests that Russell (often employed in a senior capacity) may have helped the younger man find employment in Providence.

Hannah’s later life

By 1855, Hannah and Russell and the children had moved to Alabama[13].  The 1860 census in Tuscaloosa, Alabama assigned Massachusetts as Hannah’s birthplace[14].  Although Russell and his youngest daughter, Emma, were enumerated at a boarding house in nearby Meridian, Mississippi in 1870[15] a search for an 1870 census record for Hannah and the other grown children has not been successful, despite two of the sons being in their late 20s and capable of running households, which they later did, remaining throughout their lives in the south.

The 1875 Rhode Island state census in Johnston, Rhode Island shows Russell, Hannah and the daughters back up north[16].  She died in Providence on 22 June 1878 (see footnote 1) after, according to her obituary, “a long and painful illness”[17] which might explain her absence from the 1870 Meridian household of her husband.

Looking back at Ashford, Connecticut

Property records in Ashford provide the direct evidence that the Jesse Andrews of Ashford was Alden Andrews’ father.

Ashford Deeds, volume 24 : 432-433.  8 Jan 1838[18] 

Jesse Andrews of Ashford sells to Alden Andrews of Ashford, 50 acres, for $200.  Described as:

A certain tract or piece of land lying in said Ashford containing about 50 acres be the same more or less and bounded south on lands of Rufus Eastman, East on land of Rufus Eastman and William Shurman, North on land of Tomson Lyon and land possessed by Nathan B. Lyon, west on lands of said Nathan B. Lyon and land of Rufus Eastman.

This is further documentation of the only Jesse Andrews found in Ashford in the 1830’s; showing him “of Ashford” selling property to Alden Andrews of Ashford in 1838.  Significantly, this item places Jesse in Ashford in the key year of 1838, only several months before Hannah’s marriage, where she is recorded as being “of Ashford.”

Another deed documents the relationship of Jesse and Alden, using the words “received by deed of my father, Jesse Andrews”:

Ashford Deeds, volume 24 : 493-494.  31 March 1838[19] 

Alden Andrews of Ashford sells to Samuel Mosely of Hampton, 50 acres, for $175.  Described as:

A certain tract or piece of land being and lying in said and bounded on the north on lands of Nathan B. Lyon and Tomson Lyon, East on lands of William Shurman and Rufus Eastman, south on land of Rufus Eastman, West on lands of Rufus Eastman & Nathan B. Lyon, being the same piece of land which I the grantor received by deed of my father, Jesse Andrews.

Ashford, Connecticut town hall, June, 2013

Ashford, Connecticut town hall, June, 2013. Photo by Diane Boumenot.

Ashford census

The federal census offers the final clue that Hannah’s parents, Jesse and Sarah Andrews of Ashford, Connecticut, were the Jesse and Sally Andrews of Warwick, Rhode Island.  Knowing that Hannah was “of Ashford” when she married in 1838, a look at the 1820, 1830, 1840 and 1850 federal census records for Ashford reveals some details about Jesse Andrews.

Each of these census records is an original record, placed online as a digital copy.  For each year, the pages give the impression of having been created in some kind of geographical order, because no other scheme seems evident.  Eastford, Connecticut was split off from Ashford in 1847[20] and it is likely the Andrews were in approximately the same place for all four decades.

1820 ASHFORD, CONN. W M <10 W M 10-15 W M 45+ W F <10 W F 10-15 W F 16-25 W F 26-44 Engaged Agric. Engaged Manuf.
Jessee Andrews [21] 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 (1) (5)

The 1820 census, the earliest Connecticut record for Jesse Andrews, is consistent with the growing family found in the earlier Warwick records.  Jesse Andrews was head of a bustling household of 11 in 1820, with five of those persons engaged in manufacture, and five household members under the age of 10 – presumably, Hannah and Alden were among them.  Although Ashford was rural, eastern Connecticut in this era was a thriving industrial area, with Norwich and Plainfield being home to several industries.  Possibly, the family was doing some sort of piecework for a local industry.

1830 ASHFORD, CONN. W M 20-29 W M 60-69 W F 20-29 W F 50-59
Jesse Andrews [22] 1 1
Benjamin Andrews, next entry to Jesse[23] 1 1

But in 1830, when Hannah and Alden would have been about 11 and 13 years old, no children were enumerated in the Jesse Andrews household, making this record serve as contradictory evidence.  Next door, if the census was done in a geographic path, Benjamin Andrews, a young man, was living with his wife (Benjamin had married Lucy Snow on 8 March 1830 at Ashford[24].)  Jesse’s almost empty house implies that the older couple had no parental responsibilities.  But the older offspring, formerly “engaged in manufactures,” would have households of their own by 1830 and possibly took the younger children with them, for household help or to work in industries close by; this supposition is based on the large number of household members “engaged in manufactures” in the prior census.  No obvious candidates for the older siblings, except for Benjamin, appear in the 1830 Eastford or Ashford enumeration districts, so they may have gone to more industrialized towns nearby.  Hannah met her husband Russell, a longtime Norwich resident, by the time of her marriage in 1838 and it is doubtful she could have met him in Ashford.

1840 ASHFORD, CONN. W M 5-9 W M 30-39 W F <5 W F 5-9 W F 30-39 Employed in Agric
Benjamin B. Andrews [25] 3 2 1 2 1 (1)

In 1840, no trace of Jesse or his wife can be found in Windham County, and no burial, probate, cemetery, newspaper or any other record can be found for Jesse after 1838.

1850 EASTFORD, CONN. Age Sex Occup Birthplace Attended school
Benjamin B. Andrews [26] 41 M Farmer R.I.
Sarah Andrews 74 F R.I.
Norris B “ 18 M Shoe Maker Conn. 1
Susan D “ 14 F Conn. 1

By 1850, Benjamin was enumerated with an older woman, Sarah Andrews, and his children, and remarkably, both Benjamin and Sarah reported being born in Rhode Island.  This theory (and unfortunately there is no further evidence for it) that Jesse is Benjamin’s father, and that Sarah was his mother, living with him and perhaps caring for his apparently motherless children, provides the only evidence that the wife of Jesse Andrews, of Ashford, was named Sarah, and the only direct link of the Ashford Andrews back to Rhode Island.  No death record can be found for Sarah.  Benjamin, after a long career in and out of jail as a noted chicken thief[27], was given a perfunctory death record in Eastford in 1885 which did not name his parents[28].  Most other death records on that page and surrounding pages recorded names and places of birth for parents.  Likely, Benjamin died friendless and no one wished to report any facts about him.

1860 NORWICH, CONN. Age Sex Occup Birthplace Attended school
Benj. B. Andrews [29] 51 M Farmer Mass
Mary A  “ 51 F Housekeeper Ct.
Norris  “ 27 M Shoe Maker Ct.
Anna “ 84 F R.I.
Michael Davis 78 M CT

Some further support for Sarah Andrews’ birth in Rhode Island occurs in the 1860 census. Benjamin and his second wife Mary Ann Davis were enumerated in Norwich, Connecticut. Although Sarah appears to be enumerated as “Anna” Andrews, this is her son’s household, based on names and ages, and further evidence that this is Sarah can be found in the 1861 city directory for Norwich, where “Sarah Andrews” boarded at 22 Spring Street, which is the same address as given for farmer “Benjamin B. Andrews[30].”

Ashford, from Connecticut Historical Collections by J.W. Barber, New Haven, 1836, p. 417.

Ashford, from Connecticut Historical Collections by J.W. Barber, New Haven, 1836, p. 417.

In conclusion

The case for Jesse and Sally Andrews married in 1795 in Warwick, Rhode Island to be Hannah’s parents rests on Hannah’s death record which states that her mother Sarah was born in Warwick, on the 1850 census report that Benjamin and the elderly Sarah Andrews were born in Rhode Island (further backed up by a flawed 1860 census), and on the evidence that Alden (and, much more hypothetically, Benjamin) were brothers of Hannah, thereby linking her more completely to the Jesse Andrews of Ashford.  Although the evidence appears contradictory at times, the story holds together and exhaustive research has uncovered no other solution.

Further research will be ongoing among the Andrews of Windham and New London counties, Connecticut, to find another likely sibling with a post-1870 death record that properly lists parents and their birthplaces.

Endnotes

[1] Two versions:  (1) City of Providence, Rhode Island, Returns of Deaths, 1856-1921, for Hannah Lanphear (died 22 June 1878), digital images, FamilySearch.org, (htttp://www.familysearch.org : accessed 4/18/2016) image 2023 of 2142, from FHL microfilm 2022884 (June 1877-June 1878).  (2; derivative of the first and omitting birthplaces of the parents) Providence, Rhode Island, “Deaths,” Book 14, p. 161, for “Hannah Lanphear,” Providence City Archives, Providence.

[2] Town of Montague, Franklin County, Massachusetts, Town Records with Births, Marriages, and Deaths, for Mr. Jesse Andrews of Montague and Miss Sarah Alvord of Greenfield (Montague, Dec. 18, 1817 on page 439, digital image, Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 04/12/2012) image 217 of 232, from Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.

[3] Town of Montague, Franklin County, Massachusetts, Montague Births and Deaths, 1744-1861, Book 1, for Jesse Andrews and Sarah Alvord, his wife, (Nancy Eliza, daughter, born Jan. 27, 1819; Sophia Lucretia, daughter, born Oct 6, “1819 or 1820”; Moses, son, born Oct 7, 1822, plus eight subsequent births, page 12-13), digital image, Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 04/12/2012) image 24 of 518, from Massachusetts Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.

[4] The marriage record reads: “2 : 258 – Andrews, Jesse, of Phillip, deceased, and Sally Arnold, of Joseph; m. by James Jerauld, Justice, Feb 22, 1795.”  Arnold, James, Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850. First Series, Births, Marriages and Deaths. 6 vols.  (Providence, Narragansett Historical Publishing Company, 1891), 1 (section: Warwick – Marriages) : 3. Note: Original book cited, Warwick Marriages 2, page 238, has not been found in Warwick City Hall and was not microfilmed with other books in the 1970’s. Note also that wife “Sally” signed her name as “Sarah” with her mark in a 1797 deed (East Greenwich, Rhode Island, Land Evidence, 10: 424, Jesse Andrews to Christopher Andrews, Town Clerk’s Office, East Greenwich.)

[5] (The 1800 census shows the couple in Warwick, with one boy under 10 and two girls under 10 plus a man and two women).  1800 U.S. Census. Kent County, Rhode Island, population schedule, Warwick, p. 38 (penned), line 15, Jesse Andrews; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 June 2014); from National Archives microfilm publication M32, roll 45.

[6] (In the 1810 census, still in Warwick, Jesse Andrew’s household shows three boys under 10, one boy 10-16, one girl under 10, and two girls 10-16 plus a man and a woman. He is enumerated next to Joseph Arnold, which is the name of his father in law, according to his marriage record, see footnote 4). 1810 U.S. Census. Kent County, Rhode Island, population schedule, Warwick, p. 22 (penned), line 22, Jesse Andrew; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 June 2014); from National Archives microfilm publication M252, roll 59.

[7] Norwich, Connecticut, “Marriages Births & Deaths No. 6,” p. 19, for “Russell Lamphere of Norwich” and “Hannah Andrews of Ashford;” Office of the City Clerk, Norwich.

[8] 1840 U.S. Census. New London County, Connecticut, population schedule, Norwich, p. 3613 & 3614 (stamped), p. 178 (stamped), line 26, Russel Lamphere; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M704, roll 30.

[9] 1850 U.S. Census. Windham, Connecticut, population schedule, Eastford Township, p. 470 (penned 471 on facing page), p. 235B (stamped 235 on previous page), dwelling 63, family 67, Sarah Andrews; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M432, roll 51.

[10]   1870 U.S. Census. Kent County, Rhode Island, population schedule, Coventry, Post Office: Summit, p. 139 (following page, stamped), p. 34 (penned), dwelling 237, family 312, Aldin Andrews; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 1471.

[11]   Coventry, Rhode Island, “Record of Deaths, 1843-1900, Town of Coventry”, Deaths section : 34, Alden Andrews; digital images, FamilySearch.org, (www.FamilySearch.org : accessed 22 June 2016) image 393 of 528, from FHL microfilm 925616 (Births, marriages, deaths 1830-1900).

[12]   1880 U.S. Census. Providence County, Rhode Island, population schedule, Providence Enumeration District 61, p.541 (stamped), p. 19 (penned), dwelling 90, family 110, Russell Lamphere; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication T9, roll 1213.

[13]   1855 census, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, “An Enumeration of the Inhabitants of the County of Tuscaloosa taken under an Act “To take the Census of the State of Alabama for the year 1855,” p. 75, line 3, household of Russel Lamphere; FHL microfilm 1,492,023.

[14]   1860 U.S. Census. Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, population schedule (free), City of Tuscaloosa, p. 448 (stamped 447 on prior page), p. 12 (penned), dwelling 130, family 130, Hannah Lamphere; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M657, roll 25.

[15]   1870 U.S. Census. Lauderdale County, Mississippi, population schedule (free), Township 6, Post Office “Meridian,” p. 29 (stamped), p. 17 (penned), dwelling 130, family 130, Russell Landfare; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 735.

[16]   1875 census, Providence County, Rhode Island, “Census of District, No. 1, Town of Johnston, June 1, 1875,” p. 51, “Silver Lake Street,” line 34, household of Russel Lamphere; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 June 2016); Rhode Island, State Census, 1865-1935 for Hannah Lamphere, 1875, Providence, Johnston, image 51 of 145.

[17]   “Providence Journal, Tuesday Morning, June 25, 1878,” obituary for Hannah Lanphere, The Providence Daily Journal, 25 June 1878, p. 2, col. 3.

[18]   Ashford, Connecticut, Deeds, 24:  493-494, Col. Jesse Andrews to Alden Andrews 8 January 1838; Town Clerk’s Office, Ashford.

[19]   Ashford, Connecticut, Deeds, 24 :  432-433, Alden Andrews to Samuel Mosely, 31 March 1838; Town Clerk’s Office, Ashford.

[20]   Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org), “Eastford, Connecticut” 09/12/2016.

[21]   1820 U.S. Census. Windham County, Connecticut, population schedule, Ashford, p. 28 (penned), p. 430 (stamped), p. 1978 (stamped), line 8, “Jessee Andrews”; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M33, roll 3.

[22]   1830 U.S. Census. Windham County, Connecticut, population schedule, Ashford, p. 166 (penned), p. 330 & 331 (penned), line 2, Jesse Andrews; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M19, roll 11.

[23]   1830 U.S. Census. Windham County, Connecticut, population schedule, Ashford, p. 166 (penned), p. 330 & 331 (penned), line 3, Benjamin Andrews; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M19, roll 11.

[24]   Ashford, Connecticut, “Births Marriages Deaths 1710-1851,” 6: 38, for Benjamin B Andrews and Lucy B. Snow “both of Ashford,” Office of the Town Clerk, Ashford.

[25]   1840 U.S. Census. Windham County, Connecticut, population schedule, Ashford, p. 4275 (stamped), line 12, Benjamin B. Andrews; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication M704, roll 32.

[26]   1850 U.S. Census. Windham County, Connecticut, population schedule, Eastford, p. 235B (stamped), line 13-16, Benjamin B. Andrews household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 May 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication roll M432_51, page 235B, image 285.

[27]   For instance, “Tuesday Apr 30 1878: Benjamin Andrews from Eastford, was brought before Judge Tilden last week, charged with stealing 10 chickens from Chas. Simpson of South Windham. He was found guilty on circumstantial evidence, and fined $5 and costs. He appealed, and in default of bonds was sent to Brooklyn to await trial. He was well known at the jail, and bears a bad reputation among his neighbors. It is stated that one year he sold 200 chickens and did not raise one of them.” – Message Boards > Topics > Newspaper Research > Willimantic Enterprise News Message Board 1877. “1262.”  Digital item, http://Ancestry.com: accessed 21 October 2013.

[28]   Eastford, Connecticut, Births Marriages Deaths, 3 (1881-1886): 210-211, for “Benjamin Andrews,” Eastford Town Hall, Eastford.

[29]   1860 U.S. Census. New London County, Connecticut, population schedule, Norwich, p. 217, line 33-37, Benjamin B. Andrews household; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 June 2016); from National Archives microfilm publication Roll M653_90, page 1000, image 375.

[30]   John W. Steadman, compiler, Directory of the City and Town of Norwich, No. 1, 1861, microfilm reprint, U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995, Ancestry.com, Norwich, Connecticut City Directory, 1861, 15, “Sarah Andrews.”

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